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Contrary to popular belief, small size doesn't necessarily an apartment dog make — plenty of small dogs are too high-energy and yappy for life in a high-rise.
Some dogs are simply easier than others: they take to training better and are fairly easygoing. Some dogs will let a stern reprimand roll off their backs, while others take even a dirty look to heart.
Some breeds bond very closely with their family and are more prone to worry or even panic when left alone by their owner. Breeds with very short coats and little or no undercoat or body fat, such as Greyhounds, are vulnerable to the cold. Being gentle with children, sturdy enough to handle the heavy-handed pets and hugs they can dish out, and having a blase attitude toward running, screaming children are all traits that make a kid-friendly dog. Friendliness toward dogs and friendliness toward humans are two completely different things.
Stranger-friendly dogs will greet guests with a wagging tail and a nuzzle; others are shy, indifferent, or even aggressive.
If you're going to share your home with a dog, you'll need to deal with some level of dog hair on your clothes and in your house. Drool-prone dogs may drape ropes of slobber on your arm and leave big, wet spots on your clothes when they come over to say hello.
Some breeds are brush-and-go dogs; others require regular bathing, clipping, and other grooming just to stay clean and healthy.
Due to poor breeding practices, some breeds are prone to certain genetic health problems, such as hip dysplasia.
Dogs come in all sizes, from the world's smallest pooch, the Chihuahua, to the towering Great Dane, how much space a dog takes up is a key factor in deciding if he is compatible with you and your living space. Easy to train dogs are more adept at forming an association between a prompt (such as the word "sit"), an action (sitting), and a consequence (getting a treat) very quickly. Dogs who were bred for jobs that require decision making, intelligence, and concentration, such as herding livestock, need to exercise their brains, just as dogs who were bred to run all day need to exercise their bodies. Common in most breeds during puppyhood and in retriever breeds at all ages, mouthiness means a tendency to nip, chew, and play-bite (a soft, fairly painless bite that doesn't puncture the skin).
Dogs that were bred to hunt, such as terriers, have an inborn desire to chase and sometimes kill other animals.
A vigorous dog may or may not be high-energy, but everything he does, he does with vigor: he strains on the leash (until you train him not to), tries to plow through obstacles, and even eats and drinks with great big gulps. Some dogs are perpetual puppies -- always begging for a game -- while others are more serious and sedate.
The Boston Terrier may have been bred to be a ferocious pit-fighter, but you'd never know it today. The Boston Terrier's small size and lively, affectionate nature make him a great family pet and companion.
Short-nosed dogs like Boston Terriers can't cool the air going into their lungs as efficiently as longer-nosed breeds, and they're much more susceptible to heat stress.
Because Boston Terriers can have respiratory problems, avoid pulling on your dog's collar to get him to go what you want. Your Boston Terrier is prone to corneal ulcers because his eyes are so large and prominent. Because of their short noses, Boston Terriers often snort, drool, and snore (sometimes loudly). While Boston Terriers typically are quiet, gentle dogs, not prone to yappiness or aggression, males can be scrappy around other dogs that they feel are invading their territory. Boston Terriers can be gluttonous about their food, so monitor their condition and make sure they don't become overweight. To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store.
HistoryAlthough everyone agrees that the Boston Terrier came into existence in the late 1800s in Boston, Massachusetts, there are varying stories about how the breed came to be. One story has it that coachmen of wealthy families developed the breed by crossing Bulldogs and the now extinct English White Terrier to create a new dog-fighting breed. While we may never know which story is true, the fact is that there was, indeed, a dog named Judge, and that from him, came the breed we know today as the Boston Terrier. According to The Complete Dog Book, Judge was "a well-built, high-stationed dog" weighing about 32 pounds. By all accounts, Judge and Kate's offspring wasn't an attractive dog, but he had other characteristics that Hooper and his friends admired, so he was widely bred.
In 1889, about 30 owners of Boston Bull Terriers formed the American Bull Terrier Club, and they called them Round Heads or Bull Terriers.
SizeThe Boston Terrier comes in three weight classes: under 15 pounds, 15 to 19 pounds, and 20 to 25 pounds. PersonalityKnown as the American Gentleman, the Boston Terrier is lively, smart, and affectionate with a gentle, even temperament.
Like every dog, the Boston Terrier needs early socialization — exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences — when they're young. HealthBoston Terriers are generally healthy, but like all breeds, they're prone to certain health conditions. If you're buying a puppy, find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your puppy's parents.
Patellar Luxation: Also known as "slipped stifles," this is a common problem in small dogs.
Allergies: Boston Terriers can suffer from a variety of allergies, ranging from contact allergies to food allergies.


Megaesophagus: This is a defect in the structure of the esophagus that causes a dog to regurgitate its undigested food. Reverse sneezing: Reverse sneezing is a condition that can occur at any time in your Boston Terrier's life. CareThe Boston Terrier is a lively dog, but he doesn't have excessive exercise requirements.
Bostons are sensitive to your tone of voice, and punishment can make them shut down, so training should be low-key and motivational. NOTE: How much your adult dog eats depends on his size, age, build, metabolism, and activity level.
Coat Color And GroomingPerennially on the best-dressed list, the Boston Terrier wears a smooth, fine coat that comes in three colors: black, seal (looks black but has a reddish cast when seen in sunlight), or brindle, all with a white muzzle, face blaze, and chest, giving him the look of wearing a tuxedo.
Brush your Boston Terrier's teeth at least two or three times a week to remove tartar buildup and the bacteria that lurk inside it. Trim his nails once or twice a month if your dog doesn't wear them down naturally to prevent painful tears and other problems. Children And Other PetsThe Boston Terrier loves children and makes a good playmate for them. Rescue GroupsBoston Terriers are often purchased without any clear understanding of what goes into owning one.
Breed OrganizationsBelow are breed clubs, organizations, and associations where you can find additional information about the Boston Terrier.
Being quiet, low energy, fairly calm indoors, and polite with the other residents, are all good qualities in an apartment dog. Low-sensitivity dogs, also called "easygoing," "tolerant," "resilient," and even "thick-skinned," can better handle a noisy, chaotic household, a louder or more assertive owner, and an inconsistent or variable routine. An anxious dog can be very destructive, barking, whining, chewing, and otherwise causing mayhem.
Dogs with a low cold tolerance need to live inside in cool climates and should have a jacket or sweater for chilly walks.
So are breeds with short noses, like Bulldogs or Pugs, since they can't pant as well to cool themselves off. Breed isn't the only factor that goes into affection levels; dogs who were raised inside a home with people around feel more comfortable with humans and bond more easily. You may be surprised by who's on that list: Fierce-looking Boxers are considered good with children, as are American Staffordshire Terriers (aka pit bulls). Our ratings are generalizations, and they're not a guarantee of how any breed or individual dog will behave. However, no matter what the breed, a dog who was exposed to lots of different types, ages, sizes, and shapes of people as a puppy will respond better to strangers as an adult. However, shedding does vary greatly among the breeds: Some dogs shed year-round, some "blow" seasonally -- produce a snowstorm of loose hair -- some do both, and some shed hardly at all. If you've got a laid-back attitude toward slobber, fine; but if you're a neatnik, you may want to choose a dog who rates low in the drool department.
Consider whether you have the time and patience for a dog that needs a lot of grooming, or the money to pay someone else to do it. This doesn't mean that every dog of that breed will develop those diseases; it just means that they're at an increased risk. Mouthy dogs are more likely to use their mouths to hold or "herd" their human family members, and they need training to learn that it's fine to gnaw on chew toys, but not on people.
When choosing a breed, think about how the dog vocalizes — with barks or howls — and how often. Nordic dogs such as Siberian Huskies were bred to range long distances, and given the chance, they'll take off after anything that catches their interest.
Although a playful pup sounds endearing, consider how many games of fetch or tag you want to play each day, and whether you have kids or other dogs who can stand in as playmates for the dog. The little American Gentleman, as he was called in the 19th century, is definitely a lover, not a fighter, although males have been known to show their terrier ancestry with a bit of posturing when they feel their territory is being invaded by another dog.
They belong to a class of dogs called brachycephalic (brachy meaning short, and cephalic meaning head).
If you have thoughts about breeding, be sure you realize that in addition to the potential whelping problems that often require a caesarean section, Boston Terrier litters typically are not large (a litter consisting of only one puppy is not uncommon). Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they're free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.
From a union with a 20-pound white dog named Burnett's Gyp (or Kate) who belonged to Edward Burnett, of Southboro, Massachusetts, came one puppy, a male named Well's Eph. The multitude of Eph's offspring were called by various names, including bullet heads, round-headed bull-and-terriers, American terriers, and Boston bulldogs.
Additionally, although the dogs being bred met the standard outlined by the club, there was a lot of inconsistency within the breed.
Silent film star Pola Negri, Rudolph Valentino's lover, reportedly took her Boston Terrier, Patsy, with her everywhere, including restaurants and nightclubs. Not all Boston Terriers will get any or all of these diseases, but it's important to be aware of them if you're considering this breed. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition. Breeders should have puppies BAER tested to determine the status of the puppies' ears before they go to new homes.
If your Boston is licking his paws or rubbing his face a great deal, he may have an allergy. Generally it occurs when your dog is overly excited, gulps his food too fast, or is affected by pollen in the air.


When you check your dog's ears, wipe them out with a cotton ball dampened with gentle, pH-balanced ear cleaner to help prevent infections.
Dogs who are highly sensitive, independent thinking, or assertive may be harder for a first-time owner to manage.
These breeds do best when a family member is home during the day or if you can take the dog to work. If you want a heat-sensitive breed, the dog will need to stay indoors with you on warm or humid days, and you'll need to be extra cautious about exercising your dog in the heat. Dogs from any breed can be good with children based on their past experiences, training on how to get along with kids, and personality. Breed isn't the only factor; dogs who lived with their littermates and mother until at least 6 to 8 weeks of age, and who spent lots of time playing with other dogs during puppyhood, are more likely to have good canine social skills. If you're a neatnik you'll need to either pick a low-shedding breed, or relax your standards.
If you're buying a puppy, it's a good idea to find out which genetic illnesses are common to the breed you're interested in, so you can ask the breeder about the physical health of your potential pup's parents and other relatives. If you pick a breed that's prone to packing on pounds, you'll need to limit treats, make sure he gets enough exercise, and measure out his daily kibble in regular meals rather than leaving food out all the time. Obedience training and interactive dog toys are good ways to give a dog a brain workout, as are dog sports and careers, such as agility and search and rescue.
Mouthy breeds tend to really enjoy a game of fetch, as well as a good chew on a chew toy that's been stuffed with kibble and treats. Dogs that like to chase need to be leashed or kept in a fenced area when outdoors, and you'll need a high, secure fence in your yard.
Without enough exercise, these breeds may put on weight and vent their pent-up energy in ways you don't like, such as barking, chewing, and digging. Like other brachycephalic dogs, the lower jaw is in proportion to the body, but they have a short upper jaw to give them a "pushed in" face. You may have to wait for several months to get a good quality Boston Terrier puppy from a qualified breeder. It's thought that their offspring was bred with one or more French Bulldogs to form the foundation for the Boston Terrier we know today.
Since the Bulldog contingency had a lot of power with the American Kennel Club (AKC) at that time, the Boston Bull Terrier fanciers decided that discretion was the better part of valor and changed the name of their club to the Boston Terrier Club, in tribute to the birthplace of the breed. After years of careful inbreeding to set the type, the Boston Terrier as we know it today was developed. When one of the restaurants refused to let her enter with her beloved dog, she stormed out, shouting "No Patsy, no Pola.
He enjoys taking a walk with you and playing in a yard, but is definitely an indoor dog and should never be housed outside.
It almost goes without saying that a highly active dog will need more than a couch potato dog. Dog toenails have blood vessels in them, and if you cut too far you can cause bleeding — and your dog may not cooperate the next time he sees the nail clippers come out. In general, he gets along well with other dogs and cats, especially if he's socialized to them at an early age. You'll get your best match if you take your dog-owning experience into account as you choose your new pooch. No matter what the breed or breed type, all dogs have strong jaws, sharp pointy teeth, and may bite in stressful circumstances. These breeds generally aren't a good fit for homes with smaller pets that can look like prey, such as cats, hamsters, or small dogs.
Breeds that need a lot of exercise are good for outdoorsy, active people, or those interested in training their dog to compete in a high-energy dog sport, such as agility. Although gentle and even-tempered, they can have the spunky attitude of their terrier ancestors.
Yet another story is that Hooper purchased Judge from another Bostonian, William O'Brian, around 1870.
In the 1900s, the breed's distinctive markings and color were painstakingly written into the standard, making them an essential feature of the breed. Goodbye forever!" Another famous person who had a Boston Terrier named Patsy was gossip columnist Louella Parsons.
Wofford College in South Carolina and Redlands High School in California claim the Boston Terrier as their mascots as well. The quality of dog food you buy also makes a difference — the better the dog food, the further it will go toward nourishing your dog and the less of it you'll need to shake into your dog's bowl. If you don't see a rescue listed for your area, contact the national breed club or a local breed club and they can point you toward a Boston Terrier rescue. Young children and dogs of any breed should always be supervised by an adult and never left alone together, period.
Breeds that were originally used for bird hunting, on the other hand, generally won't chase, but you'll probably have a hard time getting their attention when there are birds flying by. When picking a breed, consider your own activity level and lifestyle, and think about whether you'll find a frisky, energetic dog invigorating or annoying. When purchasing a Boston Terrier puppy, it's wise to ask the breeder if the puppy has been tested for juvenile cataracts.
Some people say that pinching the nostrils closed or holding the palm of your hand over his nose so the dog is forced to breathe through his mouth is the quickest way to stop the reverse sneezing.



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