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Yeast infection on ear,went down girl yeast infection,untreated yeast infection leads to - Test Out

Author: admin, 24.03.2014

If your Pug stinks like dirty feet, is very itchy and has blackened, thickened skin, his problem could be a yeast infection. Both people and dogs have a normal amount of healthy levels of yeast that occur naturally on the body.
An underactive immune system can lead to yeast overgrowth, because it can't control the balance. When your dog's immune system is turned off with drugs, it can't do its job of regulating and balancing normal flora levels, so your pet ends up with yeast blooms. When conventional vets see dogs with allergies and possibly secondary skin infections, often they prescribe antibiotics. Another reason an allergic dog, in particular, can end up with a lot of yeast is he can actually develop an allergy to his yeast. So dogs with an underactive immune system or that are immuno-suppressed can end up with a yeast infection, as well as dogs that have overactive immune systems, or allergies.
Definitive diagnosis by a vet of a yeast infection is accomplished either by cytology (looking at a skin swab under a microscope) or by culturing (submitting a sterile swab of the skin to the lab where the cells are grown and identified on a petri dish).
But as a pet owner, you'll be able to tell if your dog has a yeast infection just by her smell. If your pet is dealing with yeast overgrowth, there are a couple of things you'll need to do. But if your dog, like the majority, has yeast in more than one spot, for example on all four paws or both ears, or especially if his entire body is yeasty, you have no choice but to look at what he's eating.
In addition to providing an anti-yeast diet and anti-fungal foods, the third thing you must do to help your dog overcome a yeast infection is to disinfect yeasty body parts. This is actually an often overlooked, but common sense, almost-free step in addressing a yeast overgrowth in pets. In human medicine, it is routine for internists and dermatologists to give patients with yeast specific protocols for cleaning affected parts of the body. Typically, a vet will hand a client with a yeasty dog a cream, salve or dip, with instructions to just keep applying it to the infected area. If you check your dog's ears and they're clean, dry and have no odor, you can skip a day of cleaning.
You can disinfect your dog's ears with either a store bought solution or with witch hazel and large cotton balls.


Yeast thrives in a moist environment and in crevices – between your dog's foot pads, for example, in armpit and groin creases, and around the vulva and anus. Since the only body parts that sweat on your dog are his nose and the pads of his feet, during hot humid months when yeast tends to thrive, you'll need to disinfect those paws. If your dog has yeast overgrowth on her skin, I recommend disinfecting her entire body with a natural, anti-fungal shampoo. Since carbs and grains ultimately feed yeast overgrowth, I don't recommend you use oatmeal-based shampoos. After shampooing with, say, a tea tree shampoo and rinsing thoroughly, follow with one of these natural anti-fungal astringent rinses to knock down the amount of yeast. If your dog is overwhelmed with an opportunistic pathogen like yeast, it's likely his immune system isn't operating at 100 percent. If your dog is producing healthy levels of immunoglobulins, he should be able to overcome almost any infection, and particularly an opportunistic yeast infection. This problem can often be seen in a dog which had a previous Staph infection and was treated with antibiotics because the drug kills off the bacteria and the yeast takes over. The typical normal, healthy flora of dogs is a naturally occurring staph, as well as a light layer of naturally occurring yeast.
Antibiotics are well-known to destroy all good bacteria along with the bad, wiping out healthy yeast levels in the process, so these drugs often make a bad situation worse. Healthy dogs don't have a 'doggy odor.' So if your pup has stinky paws or musty-smelling ears, chances are she's dealing with a yeast overgrowth. The way you nourish your dog is either going to help his immune system manage yeast, or it's going to feed a potential or existing yeast overgrowth situation.
There are 'secret,' hidden forms of sugar that can also feed yeast overgrowth, for instance, honey.
These foods are both anti-fungal and anti-yeast and can be beneficial in helping reduce the yeast level in your dog's body. The problem with this approach is that as yeast dies off, it forms layer of dead yeast on top of layer of dead yeast.
Just as some people produce lots of earwax and clean their ears daily, while others produce almost no earwax, the same applies to dogs. So if your Lab has soupy ears throughout the summer months, you'll need to clean them every day during that period.


Again, the amount of cleaning should correlate with the amount of debris built up in the ear. Use as many cotton balls as it takes to remove all the debris from the ears at each cleaning.
Yeast lives under the nail beds and in all the creases you can't get to if the paws aren't submerged in a foot soak.
Learn how to spot a yeast overgrowth, how to treat a flare-up, and tips to prevent the problem from recurring. If that's the case with your pet, you can probably get by just treating that ear for yeast and keeping your fingers crossed his immune system responds to re-balance his natural flora. Both MDs and veterinarians advise patients with yeast to get the sugars out of their diets. Although honey can be beneficial for pets in some cases, it does provide a food source for yeast. Unless you remove the dead layers of yeast and disinfect the skin, adding loads of ointment to layers of dead yeast can actually exacerbate the problem.
Pour the gallon of solution over her and rub it into her coat and skin, focusing on body parts that tend to grow yeast -- armpits, feet, groin area and around the tail.
When there is a yeast infection in the ears, there is usually a foul odor and excessive light tan or golden wax. In fact, some people refer to a yeast infection of a dog's paws as 'Frito Feet.' It's a pungent, musty, unpleasant smell.
So if your dog is yeasty, you'll need to carefully read his pet food and treat labels and avoid any product containing honey, high fructose corn syrup, and even white potatoes and sweet potatoes. It will grow from wax, to yeast, to a fulminating bacterial infection unless you deal with it.
I wish I could tell you yeast is easy to treat and avoid without addressing diet, but it isn't.



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