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Diy Wood Plank Kitchen Countertops,How To Make A Tortilla Press,Garden Playhouse Plans Free,Lacquer Paint On Wood - Reviews

19.10.2014 admin
As we have established many times over by now, my kitchen was full of a lot of nightmarish problems that added up to everything being pretty much terrible and disgusting. I thought briefly of doing this super cool faux-concrete treatment to the existing counters, which seems relatively easy and looks great, but I felt really strongly that the countertops should be wood. I really wanted butcher block counters, but even at IKEA (which seems to be the cheapest option around, after much researching), the countertops alone would have run me about $320, not to mention the cost of transporting them here. I’m not entirely sure what to seal the countertops with in the long-term, but for now I put a generous coating of mineral oil on them to give them some water resistance and bring out the natural color of the fir. Every time I see the long view of the kitchen I am shocked at how high the ceilings are (sooooooo awesooooome). I think this is probably a little overboard for countertops (as opposed to artisanal cutting boards), so you could definitely do a faster application over a larger surface.
PERSONALLY, if you’re keeping your kitchen longterm and love butcher block, I’d say go for it!
If you missed the other posts on how I built this solid cedar countertop, you can see the actual building process here, followed by the sanding and cutting to size here.
I personally would go ahead and apply the polyurethane to protect the wood while you work on the shelves, and save the final coat until the project is all finished. Looking back on this post from January (THAT WAS EIGHT MONTHS AGO, UGH!) you can see that I planned to put a piece of butcherblock there to fill the whole space.
I had absolutely nothing to do with the making of the countertop at all, but Daniel has written up a great post explaining exactly how he did it using nothing more than a circular saw, a Kreg jig, screws and good looks.
When it came to finishing the countertop, my first thought was to stain it black with India ink (!) and then apply a marine varnish for protection, but once it was in place I really liked having more wood tones in the room. It’s crazy how that one little piece of wood can just make everything so much more polished and tied together. Gabrielle, I like Waterlox for floors, but it’s too high-sheen for my taste on countertops.
I took a woodworking class a couple years ago and the instructor (a Swedish woman, incidentally) recommended leather dye to get a true black finish. Rita, the only thing I’d be concerned about with leather dye (and any type of stain or dye, really) on a countertop would be the possible toxicity and whether it could potentially leach into food it comes in contact with. I needed a little extra length to my farmhouse style kitchen island - and had just enough planks left over to do just that.


I love the section of butcher block I have in my apartment kitchen, and given that the rest of the room is mainly black and white, I worried that the concrete would end up making things feel too cold and flat——the kitchen really needs some wood color and texture to bring it to life and inject some warmth.
I bought this thing for a freelance project a while back, and it does a fabulous job of joining pieces of wood easily by helping you drill nice little pocket holes. I love the way the wood looks with all of the knots and imperfections, and the tone of the wood is so pretty. If the doors are full face and the countertop is flush with the cabinet doors it will look great and have a boxy flat industrial look. The theory is that you are building up a slurry of wood and finish that fills in the little holes and gaps in the grain leaving you with a nice finish. I’m currently fantasizing about the IKEA butcherblock countertops for our kitchen, but these look beautiful!
May I just say that that front piece of wood, the front-most plank in the middle, has absolutely gorgeous grain! I am doing a very similar project and I was waiting to see how you attached the wood top to the wall and cabinets below.
The fact that you knew to use wood conditioner before staining, and that you sanded the sharp wood edges shows that you are doing professional -quality carpentry! My Hubs brought home an old wooden ice box that I am refinishing, but I couldn’t figure out what color I wanted to do it.
My decision years ago to use pre-fab, freestanding IKEA kitchen units rather than fitted cabinets meant hoping for the best in terms of maximizing the usable space in the room. Ideally the counter would be bracketed to the walls for support, but because I don’t want to drill into the tile (I want to have the option of changing this kitchen around in the future, which is why I tiled all the way down to the baseboard moldings), I opted to use four adjustable VIKA KAJ legs from IKEA. My favorite kitchens are ones that look like they’ve come to where they are over a long period of time rather than being a brand-new matched set of parts, so the less uniformity of natural materials the better.
I’ve read good things about Watco Butcher Block Oil (basically tung oil and solvents) on woodworking forums, so decided to give it a shot. We’ve had a very difficult time trying to get a plumber in to disconnect the radiators (that might sound like an easy job, but the steam pipes need to be cut, re-threaded, capped at basement-level and eventually extended and re-routed, which is beyond our level of DIY-ness), but we FINALLY have a plumber booked for next Wednesday. I forgot that the bond is much stronger if you drill two holes instead of one at each screw placement, so I did that for the second countertop (which I stupidly did not photograph). Nora and I just switched on and off when our arms began to feel like Jell-O, and it probably took about an hour (maybe more) for each countertop.


I actually made a smaller section of countertop for my friend Anna after I made my own and attempted to do this with a circular saw and a rigid metal cutting guide, and that worked pretty well.
We used waterlox to seal our wood front door, and I’ve heard of others using it on butcher block.
We did have to tear out part of the kitchen ceiling and they got covered in some debris, but it was easy to just vacuum off the crevices and stuff and wipe them down. Whenever I see those DIY shows and people scoff at butcher block, I go off on a rant because they are very clearly wrong. So I wanted cheap, fast wood counters that wouldn’t be too precious but would get the job done. My dad, who has way more experience in this kind of stuff, made me seal the wood after staining (cuz I was also painting something over the stain) honestly I can’t tell you more about the sealer it was in an unlabeled can.
When Daniel told me he was planning to make his own countertops out of fir framing lumber, I hopped on that bandwagon real quick. Three of the legs are set at the corners of the countertop, and the fourth leg is positioned back about 20″ so that the front right corner (next to the stove) appears to float. The thing with stainless countertops is that you have to stop caring about scratches and other visible wear and just let it do what it’s going to do. I originally was just oiling my counters with mineral oil and over time they developed a black ring where I set down my soap bottle and the wood was really dark by the faucet for the sink. Then when I applied the coat of polyurethane on top, it first looked gorgeous while wet, but it dried sorta white and you could barely see the wood grain underneath.
It can make soft woods look more like hardwoods, because it makes the grain less contrast-y.
I dropped a few subtle hints like, “gosh, I really wish someone loved me enough to make me a piece of countertop,” and the next thing I knew, there it was! Within a week or so of putting on the Waterlox the black ring and darkness around the sink was gone, and the wood was restored to its beautiful glowing self!



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