Built Outdoor Table Around Tree,Curved Dining Bench Plans,woodworking patterns for kids - 2016 Feature

We walked the decks, exploring our ship and enjoyed the lounges, shop areas and the many other nooks and crannies of entertainment and activity spread around the decks. As the tour bus careened down the highway, we looked at the pastoral scenes, of groves of olive trees and vineyards, dotting the gently rolling landscape.
We walked through the narrow, cobbled streets and admired the well preserved walls and quaint shops that appeared around every turn.
The Canne waterfront surrounds the marina, a central square, filled with Sycamore trees, and replete with several cafes and their ubiquitous outside tables and chairs.
The first wonder that we passed is Antonio Gaudi’s “Batlo House.” Built in 1906, it is several stories high and has a delightful facade of painted ceramic tiles. The Devonshire spread ( as in butt the size of) still engulfed us, so we did another five laps around the deck # 7 promenade. Sounds of French, Italian, Spanish and several other languages swam around our ears as we sat musing about where we were.
Built for a 1929 world exposition, this elegant structure and plaza is now an art museum.
For 5 euros each, we entered and walked around the inside periphery of this two thousand year old castle. A swirl of languages provided an auditory bath for our ears, as we walked amid the crowds, enjoying the life and laughter of so many around us.
We were seated at a small table for two and ordered a bottle of Meridian Merlot from a Ukranian wine steward named ‘Igor.” We exchanged several comments in Russian and enjoyed the conversation with him. Looking at these originals gives you an appreciation for the odd seven hundred years that the place had been around.
We watched as several fishermen worked around their small fishing dories, cleaning and mending nets.
By now, I was recovering a bit and managed to remember enough French to thank her and say that she was “very kind for helping me.” I kept my hand elevated, in a position of “The french salute, but with the wrong finger,” as we walked around the grounds of the cathedral.


The streets in the area have ornamental wrought iron lamp posts and the buildings are adorned with ornate metal floral designs. Originally planned as a 60 residence housing project for the wealthy, only two homes were ever built. We squeezed into a table with two charming Southern Belles from Kentucky, Sandy and JoQuetta. We had decided to eat at the Hotel’s “Taverna,” rather than risk ramming around the area when we were this tired.
A 60 foot high cliff, with grecian columned buildings, marks the eastern edge of the Villa Borghese and frame much of the remainder of the piazza. The olive trees took thirty years to mature enough to yield sufficient fruit for a pressing. The guide wasn’t doing any hand flips over the architectural style and there didn’t appear to be any large crowds around on this, an Easter morning. Throngs of tourists, from all over the globe, swirled around us in a multi-cultural sea that was dizzying to the ear. Around its periphery are a series of hotels, trendy shops and restaurants with awnings and chairs for tourists and Sienans to enjoy the Tuscan sun.
Some places were elaborately laid out, with formal tableware, perhaps in anticipation of Easter Brunches later in the morning.
The site had been built to commemorate the arrival of water, in underground pipes, to Marseilles.
Then, we were standing in from of a glassed-in sepulcher that reputedly holds the remains of the founder of the catholic church, the rock upon which Christ had built his earthly church, Peter, the fisherman.
We sat by the fountain, listening to a musical group playing nearby, and enjoying the whole panoply of activities that swirled around us in this huge meeting place in Rome. The first pressing is the most valued and usually labeled “extra virgin oil.” A killing frost had destroyed much of the local trees in the 1980’s.


Each year, on July 12 and August 16th, a colorful horse race is run around the periphery of this wide Piazza, with ten especially trained horses and jockeys representing parts of the city.
It was too chilly to sit in the outdoor cafes, so we walked the length of the area, drinking in the sights and sounds of a place that we would never perhaps return to. The newer trees were only now approaching the proper maturity to deliver ripe olives for oil pressing. That was to be the last time we agreed to ‘share a table” with strangers when asked by the various maitre-d’s.
We walked about the beautiful parkland, enjoying the flowers, the bright colors and the activity in and around the casino. Looking out towards the fortress, on the very edge of the harbor, is a large stone arch built to commemorate French soldiers killed in the Orient.
Across the small plaza, from the Cathedral, sits a more modern building with a huge painting by Picasso, on its facade. Throngs of other tourists from everywhere stood around us, as we too pitched coins backwards over our shoulders in hope of returning to Rome yet again.We had done this twice before and returned each time, so maybe the magic works.
The buildings all around the piazza are replete with papal insignia and looked impossibly old to us, pilgrims from a land where three hundred years is a long time. We ate slowly and enjoyed our surroundings and each other, never forgetting who we are and how far we had come to be sitting here under the Roman sun.The tab was a reasonable 40 euros.




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