If taken for what it is, the book amounts to the peaceful overthrow of many long held scientific beliefs and models, and establishes a framework that accomodates both science and spirituality. In this “chilling, in-depth examination of a rapidly emerging global crisis” (In These Times), Maude Barlow and Tony Clarke, two of the most active opponents to the privatization of water show how, contrary to received wisdom, water mainly flows uphill to the wealthy. Each of the editors has contributed a lost book essay to this collection, including Michael Ondaatje on Sri Lankan filmmaker Tissa Abeysekara’s Bringing Tony Home, a novella about a mutual era of childhood.
Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith galvanized readers with their astonishing Jackson Pollock: An American Saga, winner of the Pulitzer Prize for biography, a book acclaimed for its miraculous research and overwhelming narrative power.
Working with the full cooperation of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, Naifeh and Smith have accessed a wealth of previously untapped materials. Though countless books have been written about Van Gogh, and though the broad outlines of his tragedy have long inhabited popular culture, no serious, ambitious examination of his life has been attempted in more than seventy years. Great art is among the most sublime, meaningful, and redeeming creations of all civilization. Award-winning Professor Sharon Latchaw Hirsh of Rosemont College speaks to these and other compelling questions in How to Look at and Understand Great Art.
Color: You study the essential principles of color and color schemes in painting and graphic art and the distinctive use of color in different epochs, all of which are deeply integral to an artist's work.
Line: You investigate the artist's use of line (the basis of art) as it describes reality, conveys expressive meaning, and gives larger structural impact to an artwork.
Composition: You learn how the artist constructs a work's overall composition in painting, graphic art, and sculpture. Traveling deeply into the artist's world, you investigate the major genres of drawing, printmaking, sculpture, and painting.
Here, Professor Hirsh takes you out of the classroom and into the studio, in a series of hands-on demonstrations you rarely find in an academic art course. In the complex genre of printmaking, you watch a contemporary artist create original prints, showing you the methods of woodcut, copper plate engraving, etching, lithograph, and silkscreen prints.
To deepen your insight into subject matter in art, additional lectures are devoted to the importance of landscapes, portraits, and self-portraits. In the course's final section, you use your newfound skills to explore the major eras and movements in Western art, from the Renaissance to the present. The knowledge you've developed allows you to recognize and appreciate the dramatic evolution of art, not merely in historical terms, but through specific understanding of how artists work. In the Limbourg brothers' Hours of the Duc de Berry (15th century), for example, you see their attempt at linear and aerial perspective; later, you see how these techniques were gloriously perfected by Masaccio, Leonardo, and other Renaissance masters.
Of huge value for appreciating modern and contemporary works, you delve into the human experiences and ways of thinking that gave birth to abstract and nonrepresentational art. Drawing on works from public and private collections, this course brings masterpieces from more than 250 of the world's greatest artists together in one place—making this thrilling course a virtual museum of art you won't be able to find anywhere else. By teaching you the artist's visual language and how to "read" it, How to Look at and Understand Great Art gives you an extraordinary key to the full, unforgettable richness of great artworks—their ability to open you up to new ways of seeing, to bring alive the majestic unfolding of history, and to reveal human experience in all its vividness, poignancy, and dynamic life.
Architects Draw offers a practical and invaluable way to help students and would-be sketchers translate what they see onto the page, not as an imitation of reality, but as a comprehensive union of voids and solids, light and shadows, lines and shapes.
Architects Draw: Freehand Fundamentals features examples from postgraduate architectural practice that explicitly connect drawing to the world of architecture. Architectural pioneers such as Frank Gehry and Greg Lynn introduced the world to the extreme forms made possible by digital fabrication. Digital Fabrications, the second volume in our new Architecture Briefs series, celebrates the design ingenuity made possible by digital fabrication techniques. This book tells the exciting story of how we have conceptualized and mapped our Solar System from antiquity to modern times.
Broad in scope and rich in imagery, this book will draw the reader into the story of our Solar System and how it has been mapped since the beginning of recorded time. First published in 1999, this much expanded and updated edition of the best-selling handbook Astrophotography for the Amateur provides a complete guide to taking pictures of stars, galaxies, the Moon, the Sun, comets, meteors and eclipses, using equipment and materials readily available to the hobbyist.
Astrophotography for the Amateur has become the standard handbook for all amateur astronomers. The familiar image of the British in the Second World War is that of the plucky underdog taking on German might. Putting resources, machines and experts at the heart of a global rather than merely imperial story, Britain's War Machine demolishes timeworn myths about wartime Britain and gives us a groundbreaking and often unsettling picture of a great power in action.
As the Nazi war machine caused death and destruction throughout Europe, one man in the Fatherland began his own reign of terror. This is the true story of the pursuit and capture of a serial killer in the heart of the Third Reich.
Due to Allied bombing raids, a total blackout was instituted throughout Berlin, including on the commuter trains—trains often used by women riding home alone from the factories. The text teaches readers how to create their "ideal study environment" by using simple time management tips to develop to-do lists, daily schedules, monthly calendars, and project boards. Best-selling author Ron Fry shows students of all ages how to develop organization skills and streamline their study time using print, electronic, and online planning tools. Proven techniques help readers establish effective lifelong organization habits that can be applied beyond the classroom, in any career as well as in daily life. Be the healthiest you’ve ever been, and possess more vitality and energy, with the Whole Health Healing System! Everything is energy, and by learning to balance vital body energies with the proper corresponding food energies, Whole Health practitioners can prevent the onset of many inflammatory symptoms associated with common ailments. Neuroscience and psychology—two fields which should complement each other in the treatment of mental health problems—have taken widely divergent paths.
The culmination of more than 30 years of research in human psychology, Primal Healing clearly explains how, for true healing to occur, you must access the deepest levels of your brain, where imprinted memories and pain lie, and fully relive the primal experiences that drive your behavior. You'll also learn the ten lifestyle factors most likely to lower your memory potential--and how to change them--the best diet to boost your brain power, the truth about "memory enhancing" supplements such as ginkgo biloba, how certain medications may affect memory performance, and when memory lapses are normal and when they indicate an underlying disease.
If you’ve ever struggled with depression or know someone who has, take heart: mindfulness practice is a simple, powerful way to naturally break depression’s self-perpetuating cycle. With The Mindful Way Through Depression, four leading researchers present insightful lessons drawn from both Eastern meditative traditions and cognitive therapy about how to triumph over this illness—and, more importantly, how to prevent it from striking again. Even successful treatments for depression too often stop short of providing you with a way to protect yourself from falling back into the downward spiral. Combining compelling stories from the author′s twenty-five-year practice, examples from his own struggles with addiction and depression, and practical exercises and tools, Embracing Fear does not pretend to teach the impossible and eliminate fear, but rather shows us that once we understand it we can live beyond its tyrannical control. On a dark and steamy Caribbean night, Brendon Burchard stood bleeding atop the crumpled hood of his wrecked car.
Since that fateful night, Brendon has lived a fully charged life, and he’s helped millions of people around the globe transform their lives and feel more alive, engaged, and fulfilled. Brendon observes that the emotional energy of the world has flatlined, and he sets out to fix it. In The Charge, Brendon argues that the only way to measurably improve the quality of your life is to learn how to activate the very 10 drives that make you most human.
Harnessing our human drives is not easy; if it were, we wouldn’t see so much restlessness in the world.
In The Charge, Brendon helps us overcome these mistakes and illuminates the path for strategically and intelligently activating our 10 human drives so that we can have the one thing we all want: more life in our lives! Since its publication, the works of the Marquis de Sade have challenged the reading public with a philosophy of relentless physical transgression. Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching is the second most translated book in the world, and the practice of religious Taoism is on the rise in China, where adherents currently number in the hundreds of millions. In his two poems, the Theogony and the Works and Days, Hesiod, who was roughly contemporary with Homer, does not describe the deeds of the heroes but provides the earliest systematic and comprehensive account of the genesis of the Greek gods and the nature of human life that became the foundation for all later Greek literature and philosophy. This question led Michael Chorost to explore profound new ideas triggered by lab research around the world, and the result is the book you now hold. With daring and sensitivity, Chorost writes about how he learned how to enhance his relationships by attending workshops teaching the power of touch. Lively and compelling, Critical Mass: How One Thing Leads to Another is the first book to bring these new ideas together and to show how they fit within the broader historical context of a rational search for better ways to live.
Philosophy of language explores some of the fundamental yet most technical problems in philosophy, such as meaning and reference, semantics, and propositional attitudes. Chapter summaries, annotated further reading and a glossary make this an indispensable introduction to those teaching philosophy of language and will be particularly useful for students coming to the subject for the first time.
Louis Althusser is remembered today as the scourge of humanist Marxism, but that was his later incarnation, an identity formed by years grappling with the intellectual inheritance of Hegel and Catholicism. Including his famed essay ‘Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses’, The Spectre of Hegel gives a unique insight into Althusser’s engagement with a philosophy he would later renounce. He soon discovered that all Mozingos in America, including his father’s line, appeared to have descended from a black man named Edward Mozingo who was brought to the Jamestown colony as a slave in 1644 and won his freedom twenty-eight years later. At a time when unprecedented change in international affairs is forcing governments, citizens, and armed forces everywhere to re-assess the question of whether military solutions to political problems are possible any longer, Martin van Creveld has written an audacious searching examination of the nature of war and of its radical transformation in our own time. For 200 years, military theory and strategy have been guided by the Clausewitzian assumption that war is rational - a reflection of national interest and an extension of politics by other means. Small-scale military eruptions around the globe have demonstrated new forms of warfare with a different cast of characters - guerilla armies, terrorists, and bandits - pursuing diverse goals by violent means with the most primitive to the most sophisticated weapons.
At this moment, armed conflicts of the type van Creveld describes are occurring throughout the world.
Pursuing bold and provocative paths of inquiry, van Creveld posits the inadequacies of our most basic ideas as to who fights wars and why and broaches the inevitability of man's need to "play" at war. Based on Department of Defense security concerns, sections of Operation Dark Heart have been redacted in the published edition. There, he led a black-ops team on the forefront of the military efforts to block the Taliban’s resurgence. Operation Dark Heart tells the story of what really went on--and what went wrong--in Afghanistan. The Secrets of the FBI by New York Times bestselling author Ronald Kessler reveals the FBI’s most closely guarded secrets and the secrets of celebrities, politicians, and movie stars uncovered by agents during their investigations.
Based on inside access, the book presents revelations about the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound, the recent Russian spy swap, Marilyn Monroe's death, Vince Foster’s suicide, and J. From Watergate to Waco, from congressional scandals to the killing of bin Laden, The Secrets of the FBI presents headline-making disclosures about the most important figures and events of our time. Secret Service agents, acting as human surveillance cameras, observe everything that goes on behind the scenes in the president's inner circle.


Kessler portrays the dangers that agents face and how they carry out their missions---from how they are trained to how they spot and assess potential threats. Since an assassination jeopardizes democracy itself, few agencies are as important as the Secret Service---and few subjects are as tantalizing as the inner sanctum of the White House. Steve Coll's Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001 offers revealing details of the CIA's involvement in the evolution of the Taliban and Al Qaeda in the years before the September 11 attacks. The authorized history of the world's oldest and most storied foreign intelligence service, drawing extensively on hitherto secret documents.
Britain's Secret Intelligence Service (also commonly known as MI6) was born a century ago amid fears of the rising power of other countries, especially Germany. MI6's early days were haphazard but it was quickly forged into an effective organization in the crucible of World War I. In a way, the aftermath of World War II was as dramatic as the war itself had been, because 1945-49 saw not only the end of the British Empire but also the emergence of a new sort of conflict-the Cold War. Ratline is the documented history about the mechanisms by which thousands of other Nazi war criminals fled to the remotest parts of the globe--including quite possibly Adolf Hitler.
It is a story involving Soviet spies, Nazi priests, and a network of Catholic monasteries and safe houses known as the rat line. As famed author Peter Levenda began his research, more information came to light: In December of 2009, it was revealed that the skull the Russians claimed was Hitler's--salvaged from the bunker in 1945--was not that of Hitler! The mystery deepened, and the author returned to his own roots hunting Nazis in North America, South America and Europe.
Only a fortnight after the start of WWII, at a meeting that has remained a secret for more than half a century, Nazi leaders and officials of the German Reichsbank approved an audacious plot to counterfeit millions of British pounds.
Drawing upon top-secret bank records, German and British correspondence, and interrogation transcripts, Lawrence Malkin reveals how an unremarkable SS officer named Bernhard Krueger attempted to bring down the world financial system. When war broke out in Europe in 1914, political leaders in the United States were swayed by popular opinion to remain neutral; yet less than three years later, the nation declared war on Germany. Doenecke reappraises the public and private diplomacy of President Woodrow Wilson and his closest advisors and explores in great depth the response of Congress to the war. The decision to engage in battle ultimately belonged to Wilson, but as Doenecke demonstrates, Wilson's choice was not made in isolation. First published in 1973, Aces High is the vivid chronicle of aerial warfare during World War One. Our most basic resource may one day be limited: our consumption doubles every twenty years—twice the rate of population increase.
The major bottled-water producers—Perrier, Evian, Naya, and now Coca-Cola and PepsiCo—are part of one of the fastest-growing and least-regulated industries, buying up freshwater rights and drying up crucial supplies. As the editors have written in a joint introduction to the book, “being lovers of books, we’ve pulled a scent of these absences behind us our whole reading lives, telling people about books that exist only on our own shelves, or even just in our own memory.” Anyone who has ever been changed by a book will find kindred spirits in the pages of Lost Classics.
While drawing liberally from the artist’s famously eloquent letters, they have also delved into hundreds of unpublished family correspondences, illuminating with poignancy the wanderings of Van Gogh’s troubled, restless soul.
Naifeh and Smith have re-created Van Gogh’s life with an astounding vividness and psychological acuity that bring a completely new and sympathetic understanding to this unique artistic genius whose signature images of sunflowers and starry nights have won a permanent place in the human imagination.
Few endeavors can equal the power of great artwork to capture aesthetic beauty, to move and inspire, to change your perceptions, and to communicate the nature of human experience. Unlike a traditional survey of art, these 36 richly illustrated lectures take you on an in-depth exploration of the practical skill of viewing art through the lenses of line, light, perspective, composition, and other crucial elements of craft and technique.
You apply your technical knowledge to major works in each genre, exploring the various purposes and types of drawings, the vast spectrum of sculpture and three-dimensional art, and the important traditions within painting and printmaking, with particular attention to how works of art are made. In the lectures on painting, for example, you study the techniques of fresco and panel painting, and you see oil painting demonstrated, including the mixing of colors, the application of opaque oils and translucent glazes, and the texturing techniques of impasto and scumbling used so memorably by Rembrandt, Van Gogh, and the Expressionists. In this unfolding progression, you encounter the stunning diversity of artworks from the early Renaissance to the Baroque and Rococo, from 19th-century Romanticism to Impressionism, from 20th-century Expressionism to Cubism, Surrealism, and Modernism, and finally to Postmodernism and the art of our own times. You observe how the impact of El Greco's Mannerist masterpiece Pentecost rests on an anti-Renaissance elongation of figures, unusual poses, and use of tertiary colors.
Here, you study influences such as the three phases of Cubism, the ideas of Kandinsky, and the penetrating imagery of Franz Marc, following the bold and thoughtful moves that freed art from imitating nature. Dana Award for Distinguished Teaching, Professor Hirsh combines a remarkable breadth of knowledge and a gift for demystifying both the imagery and the motives of art, leaving you with lasting insight into classic masterpieces as well as challenging contemporary works.
For nearly forty years, revered Cooper Union professor and artist Sue Gussow has taught aspiring architects of varying abilities how to fully observe and perceive the spaces that make up our physical environment.
Author Mo Zell introduces readers to architecture's visual language, showing them how to think spatially and getting them started in architectural drawing with a series of instructive tutorials. Author Lisa Iwamoto explores the methods architects use to calibrate digital designs with physical forms.
This has been prompted by the launching of giant orbiting telescopes and space probes, the discovery of new planetary moons and heavenly bodies that orbit the Sun, and the demotion of Pluto as a planet.
David Edgerton's bold, compelling new history shows the conflict in a new light, with Britain as a very wealthy country, formidable in arms, ruthless in pursuit of its interests, and in command of a global production system. It created and deployed a vast empire of machines, from the humble tramp steamer to the battleship, from the rifle to the tank, made in colossal factories the world over. An employed family man, party member, and sergeant in the infamous Brownshirts, he had worked his way up in the Berlin railroad from a manual laborer laying track to assistant signalman.
He escalated from simply frightening women to physically attacking them, eventually raping and murdering them.
Mark Mincolla outlines the Whole Health Healing System, his unique method based on more than thirty years’ experience as a holistic medical practitioner. This one-of-a-kind system will lead you down the path to natural healing and help you easily achieve physical health and spiritual oneness as never before. While neurologists work to find the answer to the human condition in minuscule neurons, psychologists study behavior to the exclusion of the brain itself. Janov's professional life changed in a single day when he heard an eerie scream welling up from the depths of a young man who was lying on the floor in therapy. Janov shows how the brain and nervous system can be imprinted by trauma during birth and early childhood, and how these imprinted memories give rise to all manner of physical and mental dysfunction. Green outlines her simple and effective program to achieve maximum memory fitness in just eight easy lessons. With The Mindful Way Through Depression, you will develop the tools you need to understand the core mental habits and patterns that lead to depression—and learn a proven method for creating genuine change that lasts a lifetime. Now with Guided Meditations for Love and Wisdom listeners will have the tools to begin—and stick with—the liberating practice of meditation.
Whether we are afraid of the dark or being alone, of failure or commitment, of public speaking or flying, fear dominates our lives, affecting nearly every decision we make. Instead of repressing or ignoring the voices of panic and dread, we learn that it is only through facing, exploring, accepting, and responding to fear that we free ourselves from its paralyzing grip. These drives are your desires for more control, competence, congruence, caring, connection, change, challenge, creative expression, contribution, and consciousness. That’s why Brendon has devised what he calls the true “activators” of human experience—a series of powerful yet simple actions you can take to radically increase your levels of energy, engagement, and fulfillment in all areas of your life.
It turns out that most of the ways we seek to meet our human drives are actually counterproductive.
Brendon Burchard is the founder of High Performance Academy and author of the #1 New York Times and #1 USA Today bestselling book The Millionaire Messenger.
This is the first book-length academic study by a single author that applies the philosophy of the Marquis de Sade to the analysis of a wide array of film texts. Yet there remains a remarkable lack of reliable information about Taoism for curious westerners. Hesiod's Cosmos reveals the unity of his vision by reading the two poems as complementary halves of a whole embracing the divine and human cosmos. Marvelous and momentous, World Wide Mind takes mind-to-mind communication out of the realm of science fiction and reveals how we are on the verge of a radical new understanding of human interaction. Drawing on that experience, he proposes that our Paleolithic bodies and our Pentium chips could be physically merged, and he explores the technologies that could do it. Chorost explains the addiction: he details the biochemistry of what makes you hunger to touch your iPhone and check your email.
He learned how to bring technology and communication together to find true love, and his story shows how we can master technology to make ourselves more human rather than less. In the seventeenth century, tired of the civil war ravaging England, Thomas Hobbes decided that he would work out what kind of government was needed for a stable society.
Some of its greatest exponents, including Gottlob Frege, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Bertrand Russell are amongst the major figures in the history of philosophy. The Spectre of Hegel collects the writings of the young Althusser, before his final epistemological break with the philosopher’s work in 1953.
Growing up, he knew that his mother’s ancestors were from France and Sweden, but he heard only suspiciously vague stories about where his father’s family was from—Italy, Portugal, the Basque country. He became a tenant farmer growing tobacco by a creek called Pantico Run, married a white woman, and fathered one of the country’s earliest mixed-race family lineages. However, van Creveld argues, the overwhelming pattern of conflict in the post-1945 world no longer yields fully to rational analysis. Although these warriors and their tactics testify to the end of conventional war as we've known it, the public and the military in the developed world continue to contemplate organized violence as conflict between the super powers.
From Lebanon to Cambodia, from Sri Lanka and the Philippines to El Salvador, the Persian Gulf, and the strife-torn nations of Eastern Europe, violent confrontations confirm a new model of warfare in which tribal, ethnic, and religious factions do battle without high-tech weapons or state-supported armies and resources. In turn brilliant and infuriating, this challenge to our thinking and planning current and future military encounters is one of the most important books on war we are likely to read in our lifetime.
The newly revised book keeps our national interests secure, but this highly qualified warrior's story is still intact.
They not only planned complex intelligence operations to beat back the insurgents, but also played a key role in executing those operations---outside the wire. Shaffer witnessed firsthand the tipping point, when what seemed like certain victory turned into failure. Ronald Kessler reveals what they have seen, providing startling, previously untold stories about the presidents, from John F. With fly-on-the-wall perspective, he captures the drama and tension that characterize agents' lives. Only tight-lipped Secret Service agents know the real story, and Kessler is the only journalist to have won their trust. From the beginning, Coll shows how the CIA's on-again, off-again engagement with Afghanistan after the end of the Soviet war left officials at Langley with inadequate resources and intelligence to appreciate the emerging power of the Taliban.


The next forty years saw MI6 taking an increasingly important-and, until now, largely hidden-role in shaping the history of Europe and the world. During these war years, MI6 also formed ties with the United States-harbingers of a relationship that would become vital to both countries' security as the century progressed. We witness MI6 wrestling with these epic developments as it tightens its bonds with the newly christened CIA, changes that would dictate the shape of the service-and the world-for decades to come. The name of one priest in particular, Monsignor Draganovic, was discovered by the author in a diary found in Indonesia.
In 2010, files from the Office of Special Investigations of the Justice Department were declassified, revealing a history of American intelligence providing cover for Nazi war criminals.
He revisited old contacts, made some new ones, and gradually the explosive story was revealed: there is no forensic evidence to prove that Adolf Hitler died in the bunker in April 1945!
But when Krueger discovered that forging pounds, and later dollars, was no easy task, he made a crucial decision: he would seek out the greatest counterfeiters of pre-war Europe and enlist them in the effort.
Part Schindler's List, part The Great Escape, this account of the Nazi plot is a fascinating portrait of deception, courage, and moral awakening. He also investigates the debates that raged in the popular media and among citizen groups that sprang up across the country as the U.S. Nothing Less Than War provides a comprehensive examination of America's internal political climate and its changing international role during the seminal period of 1914--1917.
A military contribution of such magnitude, coupled with the delivery of oil to the German war machine and the personal respect which Ion Antonescu enjoyed from Hitler, places Romania on a par with Italy as a principal ally of Germany.
In a thoroughly detailed and meticulously researched fashion, she lays open study upon study that point to the possibility of a universal energy source, the "Zero Point Field" as she cites it.
At the same time, increasingly transnational corporations are plotting to control the world’s dwindling water supply. Using timeless masterpieces of Western painting, sculpture, and graphic art, as well as hands-on studio demonstrations, Professor Hirsh gives you the specific visual and interpretive knowledge you need to approach great artworks, find their deeper meanings, and reach startling new levels of appreciation. While the practical value of computer-aided drafting and photorealistic modeling areindisputable, but you won't find the soul of architecture in the machine. Gussow skillfully applies architectural language to twenty-one drawing exercises that tackle a variety of formsfrom peas in a pod to monkeys, skeletons, dinosaur bones, and the art of Giacometti and Mondrian. Presenting three-dimensional design problems, she coaches students through the fundamentals of proportion and scale, space and volume, path and place, and materials and textures. The book is organized according to five types of digital fabrication techniques: tessellating, sectioning, folding, contouring, and forming.
Rather than belittled by a Nazi behemoth, Britain arguably had the world's most advanced mechanized forces. Scientists and engineers invented new weapons, encouraged by a government and prime minister enthusiastic about the latest technologies. Beginning in September 1940, he started casually tossing their bodies off the moving train.
When you are able to access these subconscious memories, you can liberate yourself and improve your health.
Each lesson focuses on one aspect of memory followed by a series of specific "memorcises" designed to build memory muscle.
Despite the fact that most people have what they “need” to be happy, they rarely feel the levels of excitement, engagement, or satisfaction they deserve. These drives shape everything you think, feel, and do in life, so understanding and mastering them is critical to your success and happiness. He is also the author of Life’s Golden Ticket and one of the top motivation and high performance trainers in the world. By employing Sade's controversial bodily-oriented philosophy within film analysis, this book provides a new understanding of notions of pain, pleasure, and the representation of the transgressive body in film. His approach was based not on utopian wishful thinking but rather on Galileo's mechanics to construct a theory of government from first principles. Then one day, a college professor told him his name may have come from sub-Saharan Africa, which made no sense at all: Mozingo was a blueeyed white man from the suburbs of Southern California. Shaffer's assessment of successes and failures in Afghanistan remains dramatic, shocking, and crucial reading for anyone concerned about the outcome of the war. They succeeded in striking at the core of the Taliban and their safe havens across the border in Pakistan. Shaffer and his team were forced to sit and watch as the insurgency grew---just across the border in Pakistan. For the first time, it tells how the FBI caught spy Robert Hanssen in its midst and how the FBI breaks into homes, offices, and embassies to plant bugging devices without getting caught. He also provides a seeming insider's perspective on personalities like George Tenet, William Casey, and anti-terrorism czar, Richard Clarke ("who seemed to wield enormous power precisely because hardly anyone knew who he was or what exactly he did for a living"). This thorough, fascinating, and revelatory account draws on a wealth of archival materials never before seen by any outsider to unveil the inner workings of the world's first spy agency.
These early years also saw the development of techniques that would become plot devices in a thousand books and films-forgery, invisible ink, disguises, concealing mechanisms, and much more.
Doenecke examines the clash of opinions over the war during this transformative period and offers a fresh perspective on America's decision to enter World War I. This "force" operates on a quantum level of photon vibrations that precedes and supercedes the strict bio-chemical mentality of current science.
Filled with symbolism, cultural and historical references, and often visionary imagery, great artworks oblige us—defy us, even—to reckon with their many meanings. She shows, for example, how cut fruit and paper bags reveal that the physical world is made up of planes, dimensions, and enclosed space. Projects are shown both in their finished forms and in working drawings, templates, and prototypes, allowing the reader to watch the process of each fantastic construction unfold.
The British, indeed Churchillian, vision of war and modernity was challenged by repeated defeat at the hands of less well-equipped enemies.
Though the Nazi party tried to censor news of the attacks, the women of Berlin soon lived in a state of constant fear. Cynthia Green, director of The Memory Enhancement Program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, has been helping people--from busy parents and CEOs to retirees--achieve maximum memory fitness. Strategically activating these drives on a consistent basis is the fastest path to living a fully charged life. We have a deep desire for change, too, but we often fail to make the right kinds of change that would make us feel more alive and in command of our lives. His famous training events and videos inspire millions of people to find their charge, share their voice, and make a greater difference. Whereas many analyses use theory to excuse and thus dilute the power of sexual and violent images, the application is deliberately transgressive and confrontational, seeking to examine cinematic representations of human relations as unflinchingly as Sade did in his novels.
His solution is unappealing to today's society, yet Hobbes had sparked a new way of thinking about human behavior in looking for the "scientific" rules of society. Ball shows how much we can understand of human behavior when we cease to try to predict and analyze the behavior of individuals and instead look to the impact of individual decisions-whether in circumstances of cooperation or conflict-can have on our laws, institutions and customs. His family greeted the news as a lark—his uncle took to calling them “Bantu warriors”—but Mozingo set off on a journey to find the truth of his roots. The journalist plunged deep into the scattered historical records, traveled the country meeting other Mozingos—white, black, and in between—and journeyed to Africa to learn what he could about Edward’s life there, retracing old slave routes he may have traversed.
In the present global atmosphere, practices that for three centuries have been considered uncivilized, such as capturing civilians or even entire communities for ransom, have begun to reappear. His group called themselves the Jedi Knights and pledged to use the dark arts of espionage to protect the country from its enemies. Bush and Barack Obama, as well as about their families, Cabinet officers, and White House aides. He shares inside accounts of past assaults that have put the Secret Service to the test, including a heroic gun battle that took down the would-be assassins of Harry S. Coll manages to weave his research into a narrative that sometimes has the feel of a Tom Clancy novel yet never crosses into excess. The interwar years were nominally peaceful, but Britain perceived numerous threats, all of which MI6 was expected to keep tabs on.
Ideas flow onto the paper through the uniquely human creative collaboration between mind and eye. Initially, Earth was seen as the center of the universe and surrounded by orbiting planets and stars.
While comprehensive, Coll's book may be hard going for those looking for a direct account of the events leading to the 9-11 attacks. The outbreak of World War II once again caught MI6 off balance, and high-profile blunders (and the memoirs of MI6 operatives such as Graham Greene) created an impression of ineffectiveness. Architects Draw, the inaugural volume of our new Architectural Briefs series, highlights this most fundamental level of speculative designfreehand drawing. Like the United States, a powerful Britain won a cheap victory, while others paid a great price. Kennedy was killed in Dallas, and the swift actions that saved Ronald Reagan after he was shot. Coll balances accounts of CIA failures with the success stories, like the capture of Mir Amal Kasi.
The CIA's 1998 engagement with bin Laden as a target for capture begins a full two-thirds of the way into Ghost Wars, only after a lengthy march through developments during the Carter, Reagan, and early Clinton Presidencies. At the same time, however, the service was pioneering cryptography at Bletchley Park (where the Enigma code would be broken) and devising the very methods and equipment that would inspire Ian Fleming's novels.
Finally, there was no center, just a vast array of galaxies with individual stars, some with their own retinue of planets.
While Secret Service agents are brave and dedicated, Kessler exposes how Secret Service management in recent years has betrayed its mission by cutting corners, risking the assassination of President Barack Obama, Vice President Joe Biden, and their families.
Given the lax standards, "It's a miracle we have not had a successful assassination," a current agent says.



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