THE MANUSCRIPT: First brought to the public’s attention in 1957 by an Italian bookseller, Enzo Ferrajoli from Barcelona, the document now known as the Vinland map was discovered bound in a thin manuscript text entitled Historia Tartarorum (now commonly referred to as the Tartar Relation).
The fate of the Speculum Historiale was very different, for Vincent’s work became a standard reference book on the shelves of monastic libraries and was constantly multiplied during the next two centuries in manuscript form. This version of East Asian geography is found in no other extant map, and its relationship to the prototype followed for the rest of the Old World is best seen by comparison with Bianco’s delineation, which itself descends from an ancient tradition. This work presents easy to follow system of debt elimination from John Cummuta who found himself with masses of debt and no job.
It is because the Tartar Relation, one, had the good fortune to become embodied in a manuscript of this popular work (possibly a substitute for, or an addition to, Books XXX-XXXII, which also contained an abridgement of Carpini’s own account) and, two, because, in general, a bulky manuscript like the Speculum Historiale had a better chance of physical survival than a slender one like Tartar Relation bound separately.


As part of Vincent’s encyclopedia of human knowledge entitled Speculum Majus, Speculum Historiale was included as a chronicle of world history from the time of man’s creation to the 13th century, in 32 sections or books.
The Tartar Relation itself was initially bound as part of a series of volumes containing 32 books of Vincent of Beauvais’ (1190-1264) Speculum Historiale [Mirror of History].
The Yale manuscript contains only Books XXI-XXIV, and comparative calculations indicate that 65 leaves are missing that could account for the table and text of Book XX (these four Books cover the history from 411 A.D. These texts may have included, in addition to the surviving books (XXI-XXIV) of the Speculum and the Tartar Relation, other books of the Speculum conjectured to have formed the missing quires and a lost final volume of the original codex. The elimination of East Asia by the western shoreline of the Sea of the Tartars has affected the distribution of place names in the Vinland map and its delineation of the hydrography.


1001 rest on the sole authority of the “Tale of the Greenlanders” in the 14th-century Flatey Book. Medieval mapmakers, from the 10th century (Cottonian map, Book II, #210) onward called the Island or Ysland (v.l. It must be noted that the textual content of these Books show no relationship with either the Vinland map or the Tartar Relation, but, instead, are to be seen within the context of all 32 Books of the Speculum Historiale.



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