15.02.2015
Fortunately, it is possible to treat sleep disorders and achieve a restful night once again. On average, a healthy adult needs approximately 7 to 8 hours of undisturbed sleep per night. Read on to learn more about the most common types of sleep disorders that menopausal women are likely to face.
There is a wide variety of sleep disorders, with a recent Gallup poll estimating 65 million sufferers of the 70-80 types of sleep disorders that exist.
For menopausal women, the most commonly reported sleep disorders are insomnia, sleep apnea, snoring, narcolepsy, and restless leg syndrome. The results of symptoms caused by these sleep disorders often closely correlate with other symptoms of menopause. Read below to learn more about how sleep disorders affect daily life, as well as other symptoms a woman undergoing menopause may be experiencing. While it is possible to suffer from sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and be completely unaware of this during the night, these interruptions in a woman's sleeping patterns will surely have a noticeable effect on her daily life. The rate of insomnia rises among women at a rate of 40% during the transitional period of menopause to post-menopause. As sleep disorders continue, a woman's level of sleep deprivation grows, and the problems can go beyond the reaches of general daytime fatigue, becoming a potentially dangerous situation. Sleep-related breathing disorders are associated with stroke, high blood pressure, psychiatric problems, and heart disease. If a woman discovers that her breathing is impaired during the night due to sleep apnea, or if the persistence of sleep disorders is causing her to endanger herself and others, it is time to see a healthcare professional for diagnosis and treatment.
For further information, click on the following link to read and learn what causes sleep disorders. Sleeping disorders cover a wide spectrum of conditions; however, there are a number of bedtime rules and habits which can help alleviate a range of these disorders.
Sleeping disorders are common during menopause and symptoms include problems with memory and concentration, snoring, and sleepwalking. To leave a comment, concern, tip, or experience about sleep disorders, please leave your comment below. The rate of sleep apnea jumps sharply after menopause, affecting 9% of postmenopausal women. Studies show that lack of sleep leads to decreased function in the daytime, including lack of concentration, irritability, and a weaker immune system. Sleep disorders can encompass a variety of symptoms and conditions; however, there are certain warning signs that are fairly common. The results of symptoms caused by these sleep disorders are often closely correlated to other symptoms of menopause.
While it is possible to suffer from sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and be completely unaware of this during the evening, these interruptions in a woman's sleeping patterns will surely have a noticeable effect on her daily life. The rate of insomnia among women increases by 40% during the transitional period of menopause to postmenopause. Click on the following link to learn more about sleep disorders, or continue reading to find out about the likely causes of sleep disorders.
In order to prevent concern about the various symptoms associated with sleep disorders during menopause, it is important to know what to expect.
If you are having trouble getting a good night's rest, it can be helpful to learn about the four most common sleep disorders that keep people up at night. The primary reason why a woman may develop sleep disorders during menopause relates to the hormonal fluctuations that are taking place within her body. Although hormonal imbalance is generally the root cause of sleep disorders during menopause, a woman's psychology can also play a part in her sleep disorders. During the years leading up to menopause, a woman must undergo a great deal of changes involving her body which can lead to feelings of anxiety, depression, and stress. Click here to learn more about the causes of sleep disorders, or continue reading below to find out the breadth of treatment options available for sleep disorders. If you have been unable to get a good night sleep in a long time, then you may have a sleeping disorder.
There is no denying the importance of a good night's sleep, yet unfortunately for many menopausal women, this is not a reality.


Sleep disorders can be a result of other common menopausal symptoms, such as night sweats or anxiety. However, if these simple lifestyle changes are not enough and a woman is still suffering from sleep disorders, she may want to move on to the next level of treatment, alternative medicine. If symptoms of sleep disorders persist, women may turn to the world of natural medicine in the pursuit of relief and a good night of sleep.
If still suffering from sleep disorders, women may turn to the third, most drastic option: pharmaceutical relief. Various prescription sleep aids are available on the market, such as zolpidem, diphenhydramine, doxylamine, and others. If symptoms are at the level of severity that a woman is still considering this final option, it is wise to speak to a healthcare professional for guidance.
Click on the following link to read more specifics about each of the treatments for sleep disorders in order to learn how to alleviate sleep disorders in a safe and effective way. Certain foods and drinks may help promote sleep and help ease sleeping disorders during menopause: one ideal combination is an oatmeal cookie and a glass of milk.
It is important to develop and maintain healthy habits during menopause, as these can prove effective in managing and easing sleeping disorders.
Sleep apnea is a disorder which causes a person to stop breathing periodically during sleep.
At some point in your life, you have probably experienced the demoralizing side effects of a night that went a little too late or been the victim of a restless sleep. Trouble sleeping tends to increase with age – bad news for women going through the phases of menopause.
Of the more than 70 that exist among 65 million sufferers, here are the top four menopausal sleep disorders that women complain the most. Sufferers of sleep apnea may not necessarily wake up during the night, but their sleep is nevertheless interrupted by irregular breathing.
This disorder commonly involves feelings of creeping, pulling, tingling, or achy sensations in the legs, which are then relieved by moving or rubbing them. Many women will experience a sleep disorder at some point in their menopausal transition, even if they have always been deep sleepers. New research has revealed that many women are suffering needlessly from a common sleep disorder known as obstructive sleep apnea (or OSA) without even knowing it. Sleep apnea is notably more common and more acute in menopausal and postmenopausal women, largely as the result of weight gain along with currently obscured hormonal mechanisms.
According to a study led by Netzer, Eliasson and Strohl, low levels of sex hormones in women are associated with sleep apnea or sleep-disordered breathing. Eichling and Sani determined that estrogen is a significant factor in restful sleep, but other research has found that progesterone is just as essential a factor. Menopausal women who experience less restful, frequently disrupted sleep should consult with their doctors about being tested for sleep apnea.
Read on to discover more about what sleep disorders are, what their main characteristics entail, and how they affect daily life.
Those with sleep disorders experience the persistent problem of going without the recommended amount of uninterrupted sleep, leading to a weakened immune system, increased anxiety, and a worsening of pre-existing medical conditions. As people age, there is a tendency to get less sleep in general, as well as less time spent in the deepest, most beneficial periods of the sleep cycle. For example, night sweats, the nighttime version of hot flashes, can disrupt sleep patterns by causing a woman to wake up several times during the night.
Keep reading to learn all about sleep disorders: what they are, what causes them, who is at risk, and how to treat them. Those with sleep disorders experience the persistent problem of going without the recommended amount of uninterrupted sleep, leading to a weakened immune system, increased anxiety, and a worsening of pre-existing medical conditions. If experiencing any of the following, the existence of one or more sleep disorders is likely.
A recent Gallup poll estimates that there are 65 million sufferers of the 70-80 types of sleep disorders that exist. For example, night sweats, the nighttime version of hot flashes, can disrupt sleep patterns by causing a woman to awaken several times during the night. The likelihood of these becomes higher during menopause, when your hormones are imbalanced and your stress levels are high.


Declining levels of hormones, specifically of estrogen and progesterone, affect a woman in myriad ways, one being sleep disorders.
Dropping levels of either hormone can cause sleep disorders, although each one influences sleep differently. Many women develop one during menopause for a variety of reasons that are explored in this article. As sleep disorders during menopause are commonly caused by hormonal fluctuations, three approaches can be considered for treating sleep disorders: (1) Lifestyle Changes, (2) Alternative Medicine, and (3) Medications. Many times, some simple changes in lifestyle can reap huge benefits in fighting sleep disorders. While these may be effective in the short term to get to sleep, in the long run they can cause dependence and don't promote the healthy REM sleep that is so necessary for healthy mind and body function. Find out about five daily habits which may restore healthy sleep patterns during menopause.
It can also manifest itself in the early hours of the morning, making it impossible to go back to sleep upon waking at an unreasonable time. Common traits of sleep apnea include intermittent bouts of gasping or snorting, which results in sleep that is anything but restorative. Estrogen and progesterone play important roles in the body's many functions, and their decline produces sleep disorders.
Sleep apnea is a disorder that involves the disruption of breathing during sleep, resulting in snoring, frequent awakening during the night, and less restful sleep. Recent research has revealed that progesterone and estrogen hormone therapy may help in easing sleep apnea and in bettering overall sleep quality in women going through menopause.
The doctors tracked 53 women ranging in age from 24 to 72, measuring their sleep and breathing patterns and hormonal levels (determined from blood samples). In the study "Effects of progesterone on sleep," investigators describe progesterone as a hormone that plays an important role in several bodily processes, including sleep quality and respiration. The risk of sleep disorders increases with age, and they can be triggered by menopause due to changes in hormone levels as well as the nighttime disturbance caused by other menopausal symptoms, such as night sweats. The sleep cycle is highly important to maintaining a healthy demeanor and immune system, and sleep disorders throw this into disarray. Sleep disorders can also lead to further depression and anxiety, which may make sleep difficult.
The sleep cycle is highly important to maintain a healthy demeanor and immune system, and sleep disorders throw this into disarray.
As people age, there is a tendency to get less sleep in general, as well as less time spent in the deepest, most beneficial periods of the sleep cycle.
The typical woman often has an extremely hectic schedule, balancing her family along with multiple other responsibilities, which can lead to little time for sleep. In fact, lack of sleep has been shown to increase the risk of depression, loss of concentration, and a weakened immune system. Melatonin is a hormone that helps regulate the sleep cycle, an internal pacemaker that controls the timing and our drive for sleep.
For resting easy, both mentally and physically, learn more about the best way to treat sleep disorders. Sleep apnea may be under-diagnosed in women, because it has traditionally been viewed as a "male" disorder. This can cause a vicious circle of lack of sleep, fatigue, and other unpleasant symptoms of menopause. You are advised to discuss any symptoms with your doctor, as sleep is vital for good health.
Simple changes such as exercising, practicing stress relief techniques, cutting out caffeine and alcohol, and using the bedroom only for sleep can all be helpful.



Sleep more sleep mask
Sleep apnea cause low blood pressure
Sleep disorders related to obesity
Sleep disorder research

Comments Menopause symptoms sleep disorders

  1. LLIaKaL
    Sort of free, uninhibited and wild.
  2. add
    Different roles (eg, motivator and educator) could.
  3. mfka
    Shine a light on practical avenues with.