An electromagnetic pulse (EMP) is a wave of energy that follows nuclear detonations and threatens to fry your personal electronics. Ideally, a Faraday cage would divert the energy from an electromagnetic pulse and prevent damage to the electronics within. Faraday cages are simple to make - the first consisted of a small room covered in metal foil, with the foil successfully countering high-voltage discharges from an electrostatic generator and preventing changes in the electrostatic environment inside. Since your microwave can keep the energy it generates within it's three walls and a viewing porthole, it will do the same and keep anything inside of it (your cell phone, iPad) safe from the energy dispersed in an electromagnetic pulse. In the event of an EMP, the cord of your microwave (if plugged in) could also act as a ground, further helping discharge any energy. In the event of an eminent EMP attack, wrapping your electronics in aluminum foil might provide a modicum of protection.
For more about shielding from someone who has spent his career doing electromagnetic shielding, see Donald R. Also see the new Directory of EMP Protection and Solar Rooftop Products now under development by Don White. A related popular myth is that there is a sharp and well-defined boundary between what is protected from EMP and what is not.
Remember that in a complete solar photovoltaic system, the inverters and battery chargers, as well as the solar panels, need to have proper shielding and transient protection.
For information about the EMP sensitivity of solar panels, and more details on the shielding of solar panel systems, see Donald J. EMP stands for electromagnetic pulse, and occurs in the form of a large burst of electromagnetic radiation that has the potential to disrupt electricity, radio waves, magnetic fields, Wi-Fi, and most other forms of electric currents we use on a daily basis. Whether a potential EMP comes in the form of a manmade nuclear attack or a natural solar flare, the effects could be disastrous.  Granted, the devastation would largely depend on the strength and severity of the pulse and the location toward which it was geared.


In the worst-case scenario, an EMP could result in a total grid-down scenario and loss of all things electricity. While this would cause most of mankind to resort to primitive measures of survival not seen since the Dark Ages, certain members of society would fare far worse than others.  Among the most at-risk for prolonged survival after an EMP are the elderly, the disabled, and young children and babies. These individuals often require personalized medical care that involves the use of electronic systems, from diabetes test meters to respiratory aids to heart monitors, the functionality of which are threatened by an EMP. With so many categories of individual at heightened risk of losing their life-support systems after an EMP strike, its important to have backups of the most essential life-sustaining devices stored in EMP-proof containers for the best chance at long-term.
Again, the effects electronic systems will suffer from an EMP largely depend on its size and altitude.  Some solar flares and low-output nuclear bombs may have very little electromagnetic effect on the earth, but precautions should be taken nonetheless. One survival tool for electronically sensitive equipment is the Faraday cage, a metal box designed to absorb the surge of an EMP without harming its contents.
However, many containers are suitable for impromptu Faraday cages including ammunition cases, metal filing cabinets, truck bed cabinets, and the like.  Therefore the thickness of the box doesn’t make much difference in determining its effectiveness against EMP waves, though thicker metal is likely to work better overall (think a large safe). Ultimately, it’s all about how you insulate and shield your devices.  Thus, a washer or dryer could be used to store some larger or obscurely shaped devices if needed, so long as all sides are made of metal and have a tightly fitting lid. For most home and commercial electronic devices, surge protectors and lighting arrestors serve to protect the systems from failure in the event of a power outage–fortunately they will also protect them against the effects of an EMP. For better or worse, since we have yet to experience an EMP strike, its unknown as to how effective surge protectors and resistors will be in a real-world event. EMPs are most commonly associated with nuclear blasts, and were first tested under the American nuclear weapons development of the 1940s and 50s. Thus, an EMP would deliver the most devastating effects to earth if a nuclear weapon exploded in space–or high in the earth’s atmosphere. Like any disaster, there’s no way of knowing the true effects of an EMP until it actually happens.  Ideally, we will never know what that experience is like, as it could mean utter devastation for most of mankind in its worse form.


The testing on cars and trucks in regards to EMP were done as levels in the 25kv to 30kv range and some vehicles survived. Because of the insufficient amount of hard data, scientists have tried to do mathematical calculations about the strength and effects of the different components of the EMP. Critical point left out: the items stored in ammo cans or METAL garbage cans MUST be insulated from the container, or it is useless.
No it's wouldn't any electrical component would be destroyed, kinda like how your car would be useless because of the electrical components. All comments, messages, ideas, remarks, or other information that you send to us (other than information protected according to the law) become and remain our property.
Whatever it is being stored in the Faraday cage must be insulated from the inside metal surface of the box, but should otherwise remain protected. On the contrary, the metal construction of most cars and trucks act as virtual Faraday cages for the electronic components contained within.  Therefore, if you were to insulate your vital medical electronics in tin foil, put them in a makeshift Faraday cage, and store it inside your vehicle, it should be protected from most moderate EMP strikes.
While a powerful surge could wipe out the grid and shut off electrical services, the devices themselves would not be harmed if plugged into a surge protector.  However, they would need to be run on a backup power source in the event of this happening. In the end, the best way to protect vital electronics, like those medical devices needed to sustain life, is to keep them disconnected from external power sources, away from antennas, and shielded in a well-sealed and insulated Faraday cage. Let's answer this question as we look at the nature of electromagnetic pulses and if your microwave could prevent damage from an energy attack. If you want to go even further, toss some electronic items you would need in a disaster in an old microwave and cover it in reflective metal tape to secure your microwave oven-turned-Faraday cage even more.



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