Not sure about your existing Backup Solution, we can review your current environment and make recommendations for effectively protecting your data. Learn how to develop disaster recovery strategies as well as how to write a disaster recovery plan with these step-by-step instructions. Formulating a detailed recovery plan is the main aim of the entire IT disaster recovery planning project. Once this work is out of the way, you’re ready to move on to developing disaster recovery strategies, followed by the actual plans. Once your disaster recovery strategies have been developed, you’re ready to translate them into disaster recovery plans. In addition to using the strategies previously developed, IT disaster recovery plans should form part of an incident response process that addresses the initial stages of the incident and the steps to be taken.
The following section details the elements in a DR plan in the sequence defined by ISO 27031 and ISO 24762. Important: Best-in-class DR plans should begin with a few pages that summarise key action steps (such as where to assemble employees if forced to evacuate the building) and lists of key contacts and their contact information for ease of authorising and launching the plan. It is in these plans that you will set out the detailed steps needed to recover your IT systems to a state in which they can support the business after a disaster. You’ll need to identify and contract with primary and alternate suppliers for all critical systems and processes, and even the sourcing of people. The next section should define roles and responsibilities of DR recovery team members, their contact details, spending limits (for example, if equipment has to be purchased) and the limits of their authority in a disaster situation. Based on the findings from incident response activities, the next step is to determine if disaster recovery plans should be launched, and which ones in particular should be invoked. A section on plan document dates and revisions is essential, and should include dates of revisions, what was revised and who approved the revisions.
Once the plan has been launched, DR teams take the materials assigned to them and proceed with response and recovery activities as specified in the plans.
These are essential in that they ensure employees are fully aware of DR plans and their responsibilities in a disaster, and DR team members have been trained in their roles and responsibilities as defined in the plans.
Then define step-by-step procedures to, for example, initiate data backup to secure alternate locations, relocate operations to an alternate space, recover systems and data at the alternate sites, and resume operations at either the original site or at a new location.
Here we can see the critical system and associated threat, the response strategy and (new) response action steps, as well as the recovery strategy and (new) recovery action steps.


This section should specify who has approved the plan, who is authorised to activate it and a list of linkages to other relevant plans and documents. And since DR planning generates a significant amount of documentation, records management (and change management) activities should also be initiated.
Technology DR plans can be enhanced with relevant recovery information and procedures obtained from system vendors.
If your organisation already has records management and change management programmes, use them in your DR planning. The key to solving the problem is not completely technology based; an IT department needs a good disaster recovery plan for when the worst happens. A disaster recovery plan needs to cover cyber-attacks, hardware failures, user failure, sabotage and natural disasters. While a basic disaster recovery plan looks good on paper, it lacks a business process that covers what an IT department should do if something goes wrong and how that data can be restored to the business. It is not as if this plan is never going to be used; figures from Storage Sweden suggest that data needs to be restored about five to 10 percent of their backed up data on an annual basis. This forward planning will reveal previously unidentified technology problems, and allow for effective counter measure.
The DRP plan called for older data to be purged to save space, which meant that back-ups were not actually being completed. Finally, it is recommended that IT departments organize disaster drills similar to those carried out by civil defense organizations in earthquake zones, such as San Francisco. While this sounds gloomy, when people are ready for the worst, it is more likely that when disaster strikes, the IT department can fix the problem quickly.
Once you have identified your critical systems, RTOs, RPOs, etc, create a table, as shown below, to help you formulate the disaster recovery strategies you will use to protect them. Then, you’ll need to establish recovery time objectives (RTOs) and recovery point objectives (RPOs). Located at the end of the plan, these can include systems inventories, application inventories, network asset inventories, contracts and service-level agreements, supplier contact data, and any additional documentation that will facilitate recovery. If DR plans are to be invoked, incident response activities can be scaled back or terminated, depending on the incident, allowing for launch of the DR plans.
This section defines the criteria for launching the plan, what data is needed and who makes the determination.


Included within this part of the plan should be assembly areas for staff (primary and alternates), procedures for notifying and activating DR team members, and procedures for standing down the plan if management determines the DR plan response is not needed. As networking bandwidth improved this basic back-up plan included wiring the data to a specialist software vendor who has data center sites in other regions. While that might not sound like much, it is the equivalent of 18- 36 days of a business year recovering from some disaster or another. The standard says that any plan should define a response to an incident and lay out an action plan.
For example, one of the biggest issues is that backup software is unreliable or misconfigured.
Arranging a drill soon after a disaster recovery plan is developed is vital, particularly if a company has recruited a new data backup provider. Here we’ll explain how to write a disaster recovery plan as well as how to develop disaster recovery strategies. Procedures should ensure an easy-to-use and repeatable process for recovering damaged IT assets and returning them to normal operation as quickly as possible.
The more detailed the plan is, the more likely the affected IT asset will be recovered and returned to normal operation. Check with your vendors while developing your DR plans to see what they have in terms of emergency recovery documentation. That means that up to 304 man-hours can be allocated every year to disaster recovery and the added workload could push back other IT projects and deployments. This plan should be so detailed and everyone is trained to know what to do at the right time. Most experts believe that a good disaster recovery back-up plan should include some form of automation and testing to eliminate such errors. This process can be seen as a timeline, such as in Figure 2, in which incident response actions precede disaster recovery actions.



Emergency text messages
Heating sources without electricity


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