Any area which is mostly flat is susceptible to blizzards, though there are some areas in the US, Australia, and the UK that suffer from blizzards more than others. Blizzards are one of nature’s deadlier storms, as the conditions make travel and movement hazardous. Visibility is drastically reduced, in some cases to as little as 3 meters or what is called zero visibility.  In a ground blizzard, though no new snow is falling, the snow already on the ground is whipped up and around by the winds to where visibility is also close to zero.
Blizzards have been known to come suddenly and while it is possible to be warned in advance, it’s not always possible to be entirely prepared for the intensity of the blizzard. Though not as common as snowstorms, tornadoes, or even hurricanes, blizzards are deadly every time they hit.
Although meteorologists are now able to more accurately predict blizzards, the storms still have the ability to cripple whole cities at a time, and deaths are almost always inevitable.
It was in 1977 that the Federal Emergency announced the first blizzard attacking the southern part of Ohio and New York.
Hurricane Sandy facts give you the detail information about the disaster which made people die and damage many buildings.


In order to qualify as a blizzard, winds have to be at least 35mph and rage for a longer period of time—at least three hours or more.
Clearing roads is not possible until after the blizzard has passed and then takes a long time due to the intensity of the build up. On the morning of the blizzard, the weather was warm, resulting in many hunters going out to take advantage of ideal conditions. Over the years, rescue missions during and after blizzards are becoming better and preparedness goes a long way towards preventing large amounts of casualties. Blizzard occurs because the high wind rolls the huge mountain of snow and the fallen sown from the sky. Traveling during the blizzard time can enhance the risk of accident, slippery, hypothermia and death. Almost every blizzard results in at least a few deaths, with some of the bigger ones resulting in hundreds of people dying. Because blizzards rage for so long, people can get trapped in their cars, freezing to death as they wait for it to clear.


The aftermath of the blizzard can be almost as dangerous as the storm itself, as people trapped inside vehicles, unheated buildings, or outdoors take longer to be found and brought to warmth and safety. Because the first blizzard hit in October, before most farmers had the opportunity to bring in their crops. One after the other the blizzards continued to hit, making travel impossible, even by train. There are weather websites set up to help people prepare for blizzards and post warnings when a snowstorm is being upgraded to a blizzard. One of the deadliest blizzards in the USA—the Great Blizzard of 1888—was a nor’easter, killing 400 people after dumping 40-50 inches of snow.



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