17.02.2014

What to do when pregnant on mirena

If you have a pelvic infection, get infections easily or have certain cancers, don’t use Mirena. Mirena is an intrauterine device (IUD) that prevents pregnancy and lasts for as long as you want, for up to 5 years. Mirena may be right for you if you’re looking for reversible birth control you can count on for up to 5 years. If you and your doctor decide that Mirena is the right birth control for you, review your health insurance plan and make an appointment to have it placed. Follow these easy steps when calling your health insurance provider to find out if Mirena is covered. After Mirena is placed, your body may experience some changes that you should pay attention to and discuss with your healthcare provider.
Find answers to frequently asked questions about Mirena, such as, how Mirena works, who Mirena is right for, how to get Mirena, and what to expect after Mirena placement. Choose a topic below to learn more about Mirena, but always remember that your healthcare provider is your best resource for any and all questions regarding Mirena and birth control in general. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is an intrauterine device (also known as an IUD) that releases small amounts of the hormone levonorgestrel locally into your uterus. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) was approved by the FDA for use in the United States in 2000 for intrauterine contraception and in 2009 to treat heavy periods for women who choose intrauterine contraception.
Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is made of soft, flexible plastic and contains the hormone levonorgestrel.
While there’s no single explanation for how Mirena works, most likely the above actions work together to prevent pregnancy for up to 5 years. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) contains a progestin hormone called levonorgestrel that is often used in birth control pills. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) may attach to or go through the wall of the uterus and cause other problems. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is one of the most effective forms of birth control. No birth control is right for everyone and there are risks associated with Mirena that you should know about. With Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system), you get effective contraception for up to 5 years and flexibility because you can have it removed by your healthcare provider whenever you want to try to have another child.
Then Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) may be a good choice because it prevents pregnancy for as long as you want, for up to 5 years. There are also risks if you become pregnant while using Mirena and the pregnancy is in the uterus. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is a hormone-releasing IUD (intrauterine device) placed in your uterus to prevent pregnancy for as long as you want for up to 5 years.
Start a conversation with your healthcare provider to find out if Mirena may be right for you. Only you and your healthcare provider can decide if Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is right for you.
You should share any current or past health conditions that you have with your healthcare provider to help you both decide if Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) may be right for you.
Have a conversation with your healthcare provider to understand if Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is a good option for you. Check with your health insurance to see if you can get Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) at no cost, including product cost and your placement and removal appointments.
Go to Insurance Coverage for more information about changes to healthcare and a list of insurance providers that may cover the cost of Mirena, including product cost and your placement and removal appointments.
If you are having trouble getting Mirena at no cost, visit CoverHer.org or call the National Women’s Law Center at 1-866-745-5487. Depending on your birth control needs and the help of your health plan, you may find that Mirena may be an affordable option for you.
Mirena is one of the most effective forms of birth control that lasts as long as you want, for up to 5 years. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) should be placed within 7 days of the start of your period. Your healthcare provider will place Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) into your uterus during an office visit. If you think you may be pregnant and are considering Mirena, please tell your healthcare provider. Some women may experience some discomfort while Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is being placed. Your healthcare provider can generally place or remove Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) during an office visit. Don’t use Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) if you have a vaginal or pelvic infection or get infections easily. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) should not be placed earlier than 6 weeks after you give birth or as directed by your healthcare provider. As a follow-up, you should visit your healthcare provider once in the first 4 to 6 weeks after Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is placed to make sure it is in the right position.


Once Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is placed, you should do a self-check of the threads* once a month to make sure it is still positioned correctly. About 12 out of 100 women using Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) develop a cyst on the ovary, sometimes known as an enlarged follicle. When you decide you want to try to have another child, Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) can be removed by your healthcare provider at any time. The reason many women may have lighter periods or stop having periods altogether with Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is related to the uterine lining.
If you have not gotten your period or have other symptoms of pregnancy during the first 6 weeks of Mirena use, contact your healthcare provider to rule out pregnancy. Every individual responds differently to medication, so talk to your healthcare provider about your individual risk factors and to see if Mirena is right for you. You and your partner shouldn’t feel Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) during intercourse, because Mirena is placed in the uterus, not the vagina. Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is a hormone-releasing system placed in your uterus to prevent pregnancy for as long as you want for up to 5 years. Don't use Mirena if you have a pelvic infection, get infections easily or have certain cancers. Although uncommon, pregnancy while using Mirena can be life threatening and may result in loss of pregnancy or fertility.
Skyla (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is a hormone-releasing IUD that prevents pregnancy for up to 3 years. Pregnancy while using Skyla is uncommon but can be life threatening and may result in loss of pregnancy or fertility. Essure® is permanent birth control that works with your body to create a natural barrier against pregnancy. Essure is not right for you if you are uncertain about ending your fertility, can have only one insert placed, suspect you are pregnant or have been pregnant within the past 6 weeks, have had your tubes tied, have an active or recent pelvic infection, or have a known allergy to contrast dye. BAYER, the Bayer Cross and Mirena, Skyla, Mirena and Essure are registered trademarks of Bayer. If pregnancy should occur with Mirena in place, remove Mirena because leaving it in place may increase the risk of spontaneous abortion and preterm labor. For the proper insertion and removal instructions, choose which MirenaA® product you are using. Made of soft, flexible plastic, Mirena is placed by your healthcare provider during an office visit.
Discuss all safety considerations with your healthcare provider and use Mirena according to the Prescribing Information. Because Mirena releases levonorgestrel into your uterus, only small amounts of the hormone enter your blood.
Unfortunately, no birth control method, including Mirena or tubal ligation (getting tubes tied), is 100% perfect. The chart below shows the chance of becoming pregnant for women who use different methods of birth control.
For detailed information about possible side effects, some potentially serious, please see Mirena Safety Considerations and the Patient Information. However, over the course of 5 years, fewer than 8 in 1,000 women become pregnant while using Mirena. Severe infection, miscarriage, premature delivery and even death can occur with pregnancies that continue with an intrauterine device (IUD).
Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) does not protect against HIV or STDs.
This is because most of the medical research conducted on Mirena for FDA approval was among women who had at least one child. If it is, then Mirena can usually be placed in your healthcare provider’s office at your next visit. If your health insurance provider does not cover the cost of Mirena, you may be able to get Mirena by using a Health Savings Account (HSA) or by contacting your Specialty Pharmacy. For detailed information about possible side effects, some potentially serious, please see Mirena Patient Information. Once placed by your healthcare provider, Mirena prevents pregnancy for as long as you want, for up to 5 years. When you ask your healthcare provider about Mirena, be sure to tell him or her if you are breastfeeding and plan to continue breastfeeding after getting Mirena placed as there is an increased risk of perforation in women who are breastfeeding.
These threads are the only part of Mirena you should be able to feel when Mirena is positioned correctly. If you want to continue using Mirena after those 5 years, you can choose to have another one placed. However, if you use tampons you should change them with care so as not to pull the threads of Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) when removing the tampon. Call your healthcare provider immediately if you experience severe pain or unexplained fever shortly after Mirena is placed. Mirena is also indicated to treat heavy menstrual bleeding in women who choose to use intrauterine contraception as their method of contraception.


Consider removing Mirena if these or the following arise during use: uterine or cervical malignancy or jaundice.
Inform women about the possibility of PID and that PID can cause tubal damage leading to ectopic pregnancy or infertility, or infrequently can necessitate hysterectomy, or cause death.
Once Mirena is placed by your healthcare provider, it is over 99% effective and works consistently to prevent pregnancy. The most effective methods, including intrauterine devices such as Mirena, are found at the top of the chart. In fact, within a year of having Mirena removed, approximately 8 out of 10 women succeed at becoming pregnant. Should you decide you do want to try to become pregnant, Mirena can be removed at any time by your healthcare provider. Because of this, your healthcare provider may try to remove Mirena, even though removing it may cause a miscarriage. So, if while using Mirena you think you or your partner might be at risk of getting an STD, use a condom and call your healthcare provider.
If you do not have a period during 6 weeks of Mirena use, contact your healthcare provider to rule out pregnancy. Talk with your healthcare provider about replacing your Mirena before your scheduled appointment to have your current Mirena removed. Evaluate women for ectopic pregnancy because the likelihood of a pregnancy being ectopic is increased with Mirena. PID is often associated with sexually transmitted infections (STIs); Mirena does not protect against STIs, including HIV. The risk of perforation is higher if inserted in lactating women and may be higher if inserted in women who are postpartum or when the uterus is fixed retroverted. Or, if at the end of the 5-year period you’re still undecided, you can have another Mirena placed. If Mirena cannot be removed, talk with your healthcare provider about the benefits and risks of continuing the pregnancy. Within a year of having Mirena removed, about 8 out of 10 women succeed at becoming pregnant. If this occurs, Mirena may be replaced within 7 days of a menstrual period after pregnancy has been ruled out.
If you do not have a period for 6 weeks during Mirena use, contact your healthcare provider to rule out pregnancy. Women who have Essure are more likely to have an ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the uterus) if they get pregnant. Tell women about the signs of ectopic pregnancy and associated risks, including loss of fertility.
Consider pregnancy if menstruation does not occur within 6 weeks of the onset of previous menstruation. Let your healthcare provider know if the cramping is severe, or if your symptoms last for more than 30 minutes as Mirena may have not been properly placed and your healthcare provider should examine you.
After your body adjusts, the number of bleeding and spotting days is likely to decrease, but may remain irregular, and you may even find that your periods stop altogether for as long as Mirena (levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system) is in place.
PID can cause serious problems such as infertility, ectopic pregnancy or pelvic pain that does not go away.
If perforation occurs, Mirena may move outside the uterus and can cause internal scarring, infection or damage to other organs. If your symptoms do not stop 30 minutes after placement, Mirena may not have been placed correctly.
If you think that Mirena has come out, use a back-up form of birth control such as condoms and spermicide and call your healthcare provider. Or you may even find that your periods stop altogether—in which case, you should contact your healthcare provider to rule out pregnancy. If you rely on Essure for birth control before receiving confirmation from your doctor, you are at risk of getting pregnant. Women with a history of ectopic pregnancy, tubal surgery, or pelvic infection carry a higher risk of ectopic pregnancy. Your healthcare provider will examine you to see if Mirena needs to be replaced or removed. Ectopic pregnancy is an emergency that requires immediate medical attention and often requires surgery.
Ectopic pregnancy can cause internal bleeding, infertility and even death, so it is important to call your healthcare provider right away if you think that you’re pregnant.




Chances of pregnancy with just a condom
Early pregnancy symptoms but negative test


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