26.09.2015

Trying to get pregnant after implanon removal

While a period may not return for several months after having the device removed, it is possible for the ovulation cycle to begin fairly quickly. The best thing that you can do to improve your chances of becoming pregnant is to see if you are ovulating. If you find that your ovulation cycle has not returned after having Implanon removed, it is best to talk to your doctor. IMPLANON is a hormone-releasing birth control implant for use by women to prevent pregnancy for up to 3 years. When the IMPLANON implant is placed correctly, your chance of getting pregnant is very low (less than 1 pregnancy per 100 women who use IMPLANON for 1 year).
The following chart shows the chance of getting pregnant for women who use different methods of birth control. The most common side effect of IMPLANON is a change in your normal menstrual bleeding pattern. In rare cases, implants have been reported to be found in a blood vessel, including a blood vessel in the lung. The implant may not be placed in your arm at all due to a failed insertion or if the implant has fallen out of the needle. Location and removal of the implant may be difficult or impossible because the implant is not where it should be. In rare cases, implants have been found in the pulmonary artery (a blood vessel in the lung). Removal of the implant may be very difficult or impossible because the implant is not where it should be. Cysts may develop on the ovaries and usually go away without treatment but sometimes surgery is needed to remove them. IMPLANON may increase your chance of serious blood clots, especially if you have other risk factors such as smoking. If you feel that the implant may have broken or bent while in your arm, contact your healthcare provider.
Your health care provider will place and remove the IMPLANON implant in a minor surgical procedure in his or her office.
If you cannot feel the implant immediately after insertion, the implant may not have been inserted, or it may have been inserted deeply. If at any time you or your healthcare provider cannot feel the IMPLANON implant, use a non-hormonal birth control method (such as condoms) until your healthcare provider confirms that the implant is in place. Depending on the exact position of the implant, removal may be difficult and may require surgery.


You will be asked to review and sign a consent form prior to inserting the IMPLANON implant. Location and removal of the implant may be very difficult or impossible because the implant is not where it should be. In addition, if at any time you or your healthcare provider cannot feel the IMPLANON implant, use a non-hormonal birth control method (such as condoms) until your healthcare provider confirms that the implant is in place. If you are breastfeeding your child, you may use IMPLANON if 4 weeks have passed since you had your baby. For this reason, there have been instances where women have become pregnant with no period after having Implanon removed. Your health care provider can insert a new implant under your skin after taking out the old one if you choose to continue using IMPLANON for birth control. It is not known if IMPLANON is as effective in very overweight women because studies did not include many overweight women. Special procedures, including surgery in the hospital, may be needed to remove the implant. If the implant cannot be found in the arm, your healthcare professional may use imaging methods on the chest. Unusual vaginal bleeding or lower stomach (abdominal) pain may be a sign of ectopic pregnancy. If you have breast cancer now, or have had it in the past, do not use IMPLANON because some breast cancers are sensitive to hormones.
You may need special tests to check that the implant is in place or to help find the implant when it is time to take it out.
If there are medicines that you have been taking for a long time, that make IMPLANON less effective, tell your health care provider.
It is important to remove the implant and make sure that the pregnancy is not ectopic (occurring outside the womb).
If you and your health care provider cannot feel the IMPLANON implant, use a non-hormonal birth control method (such as condoms) until your health care provider confirms that the implant is in place. In studies, about one out of ten women stopped using the implant because of an unfavorable change in their bleeding pattern. Your health care provider will insert the implant just under the skin of the inner side of your upper arm. If you do not want to get pregnant after your health care provider removes the IMPLANON implant, you should start another birth control method right away. IMPLANON also thickens the mucus in your cervix and this change may keep sperm from reaching the egg.


Immediately after insertion, and with help from your health care provider, you should be able to feel the implant under your skin.
If the implant is not removed, then the effects of IMPLANON will continue for a longer period of time. Use a back up birth control method and call your health care provider right away if the implant comes out. Your health care provider will fill out the USER CARD with the date the implant was inserted and the date the implant is to be removed. In some situations, you may need a backup method of contraception for 7 days after insertion. Your health care provider may remove the IMPLANON implant and recommend a birth control method that can be used effectively with these medicines. Based on experience with other hormonal contraceptives, IMPLANON is not likely to cause birth defects. The health of breast-fed children whose mothers were using the implant has been studied up to 3 years of age in a small number of children.
Removal of the implant may be very difficult or impossible if the implant is not where it should be. Many women who choose to avoid pregnancy with Implanon find themselves in this situation when they decide to have it removed. The box on the bottom of the chart shows the chance of getting pregnant for women who do not use birth control and are trying to get pregnant. Call your healthcare provider right away if you think you are pregnant or have unexplained lower stomach (abdominal) pain.
Schedule an appointment with your health care provider to remove the implant on or before the removal date.
If you are breastfeeding and want to use IMPLANON, talk with your health care provider for more information. Tell your doctor at least 4 weeks before if you are going to have surgery or will need to be on bed rest, because you have an increased chance of getting blood clots during surgery or bed rest. Other problems related to insertion and removal include pain, irritation, swelling, bruising, scarring, infection, injury to the nerves or blood vessels, and breaking of the implant. If IMPLANON is covered, ask the customer service representative to send verification of coverage to your health care provider.



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