05.08.2015

Baby pregnancy

Luckily, your baby doesn't have teeth yet that would need a brushing after that sugary treat, but it won't be long before you'll need to buy that first baby toothbrush! Your baby's height and weight haven't changed much in the past week, but the big news is your baby's brain gain. Another big change this week: Your baby's bone marrow has taken over production of red blood cells (before, tissue groups and then the spleen took care of producing the blood cells).
As far as growth goes, your baby's still on a roll, measuring an impressive 18 inches and weighing in at more than three pounds.
While your baby is still getting nourishment through the umbilical cord, it won't be long before you'll be bringing on the breast milk or formula (and soon after, the mashed carrots and peas). And because your baby is accumulating more fat, his or her skin is finally turning opaque (like yours), which means those see-through days are over. This week your baby may be anywhere between 17 to 19 inches in length and weigh more than four and a half pounds.
The level of amniotic fluid in your uterus has reached its maximum, making it likely that you have more baby than fluid now. If your uterine walls had eyes, here's what you'd see: your fetus acting more and more like a baby, with his or her eyes closing during sleep and opening while awake. Your baby's fingernails now reach the end of the fingertips and may even curl over the tip, making a manicure one of the first things you'll need to do for your little bundle. At about 20 inches and five and a half pounds (but with about five more weeks to grow), most of your baby's growth over the next month or so before you meet will be in weight (with a gain of anywhere from one pound to several), not height (baby's pretty much reached the in utero limit in that department).
By now, many of your baby's systems are pretty mature, at least in baby terms — and just about ready for life on the outside. With just three more weeks to go and at about six and a half pounds (though weight and height vary from fetus to fetus), your baby is doing just fine. Here's an interesting fact: Your baby's head (which, by the way, is still growing) will, at birth, be the same size circumference as his or her hips, abdomen, and shoulders. Your baby's weight and height have probably increased only a little from last week (and your overstretched skin is probably grateful for that). Your baby's skin has now finally changed from pink to white (no matter how dark-skinned he or she will be eventually; pigmentation will occur soon following birth). The first thing you're likely to look for when baby makes his or her dramatic (and possibly fashionably late) entrance: proof positive that he is actually a he, or she is actually a she. Gearing up for the big day is your baby's endocrine system — responsible for hormone production.
And with each passing week, your fetus is looking more and more like the baby you're picturing in your dreams. Listen up: Tiny bones in your fetus's ears are in place this week, making it likely that the baby can hear your voice when you're speaking (or singing in the shower). This week your baby is hitting the height chart at five and a half inches long (remember, that's crown to rump) and weighs about five ounces (the weight of that boneless chicken breast you're making for dinner).
Something you won't see on the ultrasound, but you'll know is in working order, is your baby's nervous system, which is maturing rapidly at this time. Six inches long this week and about eight ounces in weight, your baby is the size of a large mango. Though the external genitals in both male and female fetuses still have a way to grow, you should be able to find out the sex of your baby (if you want to) during an ultrasound exam. At about seven inches in length and almost 11 ounces in weight, your baby is about the size of a large banana. Your baby still has a great deal of room in your womb — though like anyone who lives in one space for a long time, this tenant will soon begin to feel cramped.
With all that belly dancing going on, it's hard to believe your baby gets any sleep at all. At eight inches and slightly over a pound, your baby is the size and shape of a small doll. You have probably heard your baby's heartbeat through a Doppler a number of times already (though you never get tired of hearing it), but by now you can also hear it through a standard stethoscope. Your baby's skin is reddish in color now because of the developing blood vessels underneath (remember, the skin is very thin still). Your baby weighs more than a pound and a half right now and sports a crown-to-rump length of about eight and a half inches (standard letter size!). The iris, the colored part of the eye, still doesn't have much pigmentation (that'll fill in over the next month or two), so it's too early to start guessing your baby's eye color. Look what else is going on this week: Your baby's brain-wave activity is kicking in, which means your little one can not only hear noises but can now also respond to them. And talking about activity, at your baby's current height and weight (about nine inches tall and two pounds), and at the rate he or she is growing, your baby will soon be feeling a little cramped in your uterus.
As the time for delivery inches closer, pregnant women can barely contain their glee and excitement.
When the baby drops, the pressure on your stomach and lungs will ease out for sure but your pelvis will take all the weight and thus, the pelvic pressure will be intense. I am feeling the same way…I am 30 weeks today and also feel like my baby is dropping. Of course, it's still best if a baby doesn't check out of that uterine hotel just yet — there's still a lot of growing and maturing to do over the next 12 weeks. Space in your baby's living quarters is now at a premium, so you'll be feeling jabs and pokes from elbows and knees mostly. You'll recall that your baby's baby-teeth buds formed weeks ago, but now the buds for permanent teeth are forming in his or her gums as well.


This is an important step for your baby, because it means he or she is better able to thrive on his or her own once born (with a little TLC from you, of course).
You can still expect your baby to gain at least three to five pounds, possibly more, before you two meet. Connections between individual nerve cells are growing at a frenetic clip, and your baby can now perceive information from all five senses. And though that's a head-to-toe length, your baby is actually back to a curled-up position (you try standing up in those cramped quarters!).
In anticipation of that momentous transition to mouth feeding, your baby's digestive system is all set and ready to go. In preparation for that big first date with you, your baby is sleeping like a baby — with sleep cycles of 20 to 40 minutes long (which would also account for the decrease in movement you're likely feeling these days). Your baby could grow a full inch more this week alone — especially if he or she has been on the shorter side.
And because those uterine walls are becoming thinner, more light penetrates the womb, helping your baby differentiate between day and night (now if only baby can remember that difference on the outside!). Your baby has reached an important milestone about now: The development of his or her own immune system that (along with antibodies from you) will be able to provide protection from mild infections. Accordingly, fat continues to accumulate at a rapid pace these days (on baby, not just on your hips).
Most of your baby's bones and cartilage are quite soft as well (they'll harden over the first few years of life) — allowing for an easier journey as your baby squeezes through the birth canal at delivery (and less prodding and poking for Mom along the way). Growth will experience a slowdown now, both so your baby will be able to fit the narrow passageway to the outside and also so he or she can store up all the energy needed for delivery. Blood circulation, for instance, has been perfected and your baby's immune system has matured enough to protect him or her from infections outside the womb. But his or her brain is still developing rapidly (a pace that continues during the first three years of life), with changes you'll be able to recognize firsthand as your baby's skill-packed bag of tricks expands almost daily.
Now officially full-term, a baby born this week will weigh in the neighborhood of seven and a half pounds and measure anywhere from 19 to 22 inches. That major mystery solved once and for all, you'll also notice that baby (besides being cute as can be — and yours!) is wearing a little leftover travel dust, consisting of blood, vernix, lanugo, and amniotic fluid. That's because after nine months in such cramped quarters, it'll take a while before your baby realizes that he or she has room to spread out. Your baby is very likely to recognize the sound of your voice — and that of your partner. Researchers theorize that baby actually sends some chemical signals (aka hormones) to the placenta to trigger labor to begin (as in: "Get me out of here, Mom!"). In fact, the first breath at birth requires considerably more effort than any breath your baby will ever take again.
No slouch anymore, your baby's neck is getting longer and his or her head is getting more erect (giving a more straightened-out appearance). That's because your baby is growing bigger each week — he or she is as long as four and a half inches right now.
But because your baby weighs so little (a bit over two ounces), you won't feel the calisthenics going on inside your abdominal gym.
In fact, studies have found that babies who are sung to while they're in the womb recognize the same tune when it's sung to them after they are born (so choose your baby Muzak with that in mind…).
For one, the backbone (along with the back muscles) is stronger now — strong enough, in fact, to enable your baby to work on straightening his or her head and neck even more.
And here's the skinny on baby skin: It's practically translucent now, so if you took a peek inside your uterus, you'd be able to see your baby's blood vessels under that thin skin. Within the next week or so, the pads on your baby's fingertips and toes will become adorned with completely individual swirls and creases (aka fingerprints).
All kinds of sounds: from air exhaling from your lungs (deep breath now), those gastric gurgles produced by your stomach and intestines, your voice and your partner's (which your baby will be able to recognize at birth), and even very loud sounds such as honking horns, barking dogs, or a wailing fire truck.
No, not because he or she's getting overheated (in fact, the amniotic fluid is perfectly climate controlled, keeping your baby at an always comfortable temperature), but because small blood vessels, called capillaries, are forming under the skin and filling with blood. Your baby's nostrils, which have been plugged up until now, are starting to open this week.
Even the color your baby will be born with might not be the permanent shade; so you may be kept guessing until your baby is close to six months old. You might find yourself fighting to catch a breath as you normally do but once you reach the end of your trimester and your baby eventually drops, this problem will be cleared significantly. During the third trimester, it can get difficult to eat a complete meal but once the baby drops, things will be easier for you because exactly like the case of the lungs, the pressure you feel on your stomach will reduce significantly. Throughout your pregnancy, you will find the need to urinate every now and then and towards the third trimester this will increase even more. Clinically proven to dramatically increase your chances of conception and help you get pregnant fast from the very first use. This fat, called white fat, is different from the earlier brown fat that your baby accumulated.
But those kicks will be more vigorous than before (and also less erratic) because your baby is stronger and excitedly responding to all sorts of stimuli — movement, sounds, light, and that candy bar you ate half an hour ago.
Now's a good time to start doing a kick count twice a day to make sure baby's doing just fine (plus, it's a good excuse for a rest). Sure, your baby can't smell anything right now, but that's only because he or she is still submerged in amniotic fluid and needs to be breathing air to get a whiff of anything. You're likely feeling tapping and squirming instead of your baby's signature rocking and rolling.


Hold a five-pound bag of flour in your arms and imagine it's your soon-to-be-born baby (cradle it, and you'll only get strange looks in the baking aisle). Back in the middle of your pregnancy, your baby's weight was made up of only two percent fat; now that percentage has soared to closer to 15 percent (and will increase to 30 percent at term). And for good reason: A soft skull will allow your baby to squeeze more easily through the birth canal. Your baby is simulating breathing by inhaling and exhaling amniotic fluid, sucking on his or her thumb, blinking, and pivoting from side to side (one day you feel the tushy on the left side, another day it has swung around to the right side). From your baby's perspective, you'll look a bit blurry (babies at birth can focus only about an inch away), but that's okay. And speaking of that head, your baby could be sprouting some hair (though the final color may not be determined until birth) and the eyebrows are filling in, too. Baby's crown-to-rump measurement is between four and five inches in length, and weight is hovering around three ounces. Your baby's eyes (which have fortunately finished their migration to the front of his or her head) are making small side-to-side movements and can even perceive some light, though the eyelids are still sealed. You'll also catch a glimpse of all the movement your baby's doing — twists, rolls, kicks, and punches. Your baby's weight in the next four weeks alone should double (and you may feel as though yours is too). Later this week, blood vessels will also develop in your baby's lungs, bringing them one step closer to full maturity — and one step closer to taking that first breath of fresh air. What this means is that your baby is able to see what's going on now (unfortunately the view in your uterus isn't all that exciting).
Once the baby drops, the pressure on your bladder will further increase and this will result in more frequent urination than ever before. And now for a limited time, Try a FREE starter pack today & receive 20 FREE pregnancy tests and a FREE Digital BBT Thermometer! Which means your baby's once skinny arms and legs are now quite plump…and irresistibly, squeezably soft. While you'll be consoling your crying baby right from the get-go, it won't be until sometime after the first month that you'll be wiping tears off those chubby cheeks. With all the tears of joy you'll probably be shedding, your baby will look a little blurry to you too. During childbirth, your baby will produce more stress hormones than any other time in his or her life (and you thought you were stressed out now!). If you could catch a glimpse of your fetus now, you'd see a baby the size of your clenched fist (a skill, by the way, your little one now has). By the time your baby is born, body fat will make up about two-thirds of his or her weight (and will make all those chubby parts especially yummy). And since practice makes perfect, your baby is sharpening his or her sucking and swallowing skills in preparation for that first (and second…and third) suckle at your breast or bottle. And would you believe your baby is finally big enough for you to start feeling those movements now (or anytime in the next few weeks).
Talking about hearing, your baby's is growing more acute, making your little one more conscious of sounds that come from inside your body (which means you could both be listening to each other hiccup — a skill that your baby has by now).
It's greasy and white and is made up of lanugo (that downy hair), oil from your baby's glands, and dead skin cells.
Thus, if you notice that you are urinating much more than previously, know that it may be because your baby has dropped. Those wrinkles allow for an increased amount of brain tissue — a necessary change as your baby prepares for life outside your womb, and the street smarts he or she will need. Your baby has also probably settled into the head-down, bottoms-up position in your pelvis. But those hormones will actually help your baby adjust rapidly to life outside the womb and help all those survival instincts to kick in as he or she becomes untethered from the placenta that has provided life support for the past nine months. In fact, most of the survival reflexes that your baby will have at birth are being perfected in utero right now. This waxy "cheese" may not sound too appetizing or attractive, but it's there for good reason: Vernix protects your baby's sensitive skin from the surrounding amniotic fluid. But remember — unless you're shining a flashlight over your belly (which you can do, by the way), it'll be mostly dark for your baby inside that cozy womb of yours.
By the time your baby is born, he or she will be pleasantly plump and filled out — from chubby cheeks to chubby toes. Though they are already beginning to develop surfactant, a substance that will help the lungs expand after the baby is born, the lungs are still too undeveloped to sufficiently send oxygen to the bloodstream and release carbon dioxide when he or she exhales. If your hubby or your mother points out any change in the position of your belly bump, know that your baby has dropped. Without it, your baby would look very wrinkled at birth (sort of what you'd look like if you soaked in a bath for nine months). Baby dropping varies greatly from one pregnancy to the other but if you can read the signs related to it, you would be able to find out when your baby drops.



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