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How to stop puppy from biting leash

How do you get your puppy to stop chewing on things,walking on a leash without pulling,dog training infomercial,ways to stop your dog from chewing your furniture - Reviews

Author: admin, 19.05.2013

Nothing's cuter than a puppy you've just taken home from the shelter, but your initial enthusiasm as a new owner can wear thin as soon as your dog starts ruining your possessions with frequent chewing. Most dog training resources agree that positive reinforcement is one of the most effective, powerful tools you have when training your dog.[1] Pairing the desired action with praise and food associates the action with feelings of pleasure and satisfaction in the dog's mind. Don't use socks, shoes, and other items that you wouldn't ordinarily want your dog chewing on.
If your dog seems to become angry, agitated, fearful, or overly submissive around other dogs, it may have a behavior disorder. Repeat this process until your dog moves away from your hand as soon as you say "leave it." This teaches your dog that ignoring whatever it wants to bite or chew on is better than chewing on that thing. When a dog starts chewing on something he isn't supposed to, stop him and give him a toy, if you do this consistently, he will know what he can chew and what he can't. To train your dog not to chew, you need to make it understand two basic ideas: that chewing its master's possessions is bad, and that chewing its own toys is good. For most dogs, chasing will usually be interpreted as "play" behavior, so you'll be essentially rewarding your dog for chewing on your things. As noted above, teaching your dog that certain items are good for chewing on is just as important (if not more so) than teaching your dog that your possessions are off-limits.
Consistency is extremely important when it comes to training a dog (or any other pet.) To ensure your dog learns acceptable chewing behavior as quickly as possible, make sure to reward every positive behavior you see and always avoid rewarding negative behavior. Every member of the family should be rewarding the same "good" chewing behaviors, discouraging the same "bad" chewing behaviors, and using the same sorts of toys and reward. Dogs are much less likely to chew on things with tastes that they find unpleasant, so one easy way to discourage your dogs from chewing on certain items is to rub them with bad-tasting substances.


A dog that has plenty of great toys to chew on is a dog that won't have much of an incentive to chew on your toys.
A dog that's cooped up indoors all day may take to chewing to relieve some of its built-up energy.[6] Take young, energetic dogs outdoors as often as possible so they can run, play, and (if they're lucky) socialize with other dogs.
Having easy access to its own toys and difficult access to your possessions makes appropriate chewing behavior the more convenient choice for your dog.
If you find that most problematic chewing seems to occur when you're not around, it may be worthwhile to get in the habit of keeping your dog in confined areas when you're away.
If you're willing to put in a little extra time and effort, it's possible to teach your dog a handy command that can save your possessions in cases where you catch it chewing on them. As soon as it loses interest in your hand, however, offer it the treat from the other hand and give it lavish praise. Also, if your dog doesn't mind bitter apple spray, then instead of bitter apple spray, your can pour water in a spray bottle and spray him if he chews on something.
To discourage your dog from chewing your possessions, wait until you see it chewing something of yours, then quickly approach it while scolding it with loud, clear commands like "NO" and "Bad dog!" Quickly give your dog something appropriate to chew and praise it lavishly when it does so. Being inconsistent sends mixed messages to your dog, teaching it that it's sometimes OK to chew on your possessions but that it can get away with it at other times. This is a great strategy for things like chair legs which can't easily be kept out of the dog's reach. Any dog should have at least a modest selection of chew toys available to it in a location it has easy access to (like its crate or bed.) With this arrangement, the dog always has something acceptable to gnaw on when it gets the urge to chew, so it won't need to look for its own solutions. The ice will cool the puppy's gums, reducing any uncomfortable swelling and relieving the urge to chew.


Be sure to take the time to play with your dog a little bit every day, especially if it's been chewing.
If kept from contact with other dogs, some dogs can resort to destructive coping behavior, including chewing. Try keeping items that you don't want your dog to chew, (like, for instance, your shoes) in spots that are inaccessible to your dog.
As long as only chew toys are easily accessible within this area, your dog should keep its chewing to these acceptable outlets. She enjoys starting articles about real problems she has in life, as well as ones about quirky topics like How to Use Life Hacks.
Luckily, the solution to this is easy: simply give your dog a chance to meet and play with other dogs. For small dogs, it's usually enough to keep your possessions on a high table or counter top as long as there isn't any way for the dog to jump up to them.
This will also collect the spray, so you can shake other items in the bag, to coat with bitter apple spray. In addition, if your dog has been chewing as a way of getting you to pay attention to it, this will help reduce the bad behavior. For bigger dogs, you may need to keep your prized possessions in places the dog can't reach, like within cabinets or behind closed doors.



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    Reward Good Reactions When a puppy learns the signals for mouth as both a taste and sound deterrent.