10 Quick Facts About New York CityWelcome

New York City is one of the biggest American cities where an estimated 8.2 million people call their home. While there is no possible way to address everything that New York City has to offer to both visitors and residents, here are “10 Quick Facts about New York City” that you may or may not already know about this great US city of concrete mountains. New York City is one of the biggest American cities where an estimated 8.2 million people call their home. While there is no possible way to address everything that New York City has to offer to both visitors and residents, here are “10 Quick Facts about New York City” that you may or may not already know about this great US city of concrete mountains.

 

New York City has quite a colorful history that actually can trace back its original roots to the Lenape inhabitants prior to the arrival of Giovanni da Verrazzano in 1524, however then the city had not been named “New York City”. Under Dutch rule in 1625, the city was named “New Amsterdam” and later renamed “New York” in 1664, after the English took control of the area. Interestingly, New York City experienced a major leap forward in 1898 after the city consolidated the “Five Boroughs” that once divided the landscape and the peoples living there.

 

Quick Fact: Number One

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New York City once served as the first capitol of the United States from September 13, 1788 to 1790.

 

Quick Fact: Number Two

General George Washington was inaugurated at the Federal Hall on Wall Street on April 30, 1789 to become the first President of the United States.

 

Quick Fact: Number Three

It is illegal to forage for food in New York City parks without having a permit.

 

Quick Fact: Number Four

Central Park

In 1853, the City of New York purchased 768 acres of land that once contained old sheds left behind by colonists, pig farms, quarries and swamps. This land was added to the land that the city had already owned to create an 843-acre city oasis that was named “Central Park”.

 

Quick Fact: Number Five

Liberty Island outside of New York City

In 1876, the French Government gave America the Statue of Liberty in honor of America's 100th birthday celebrating the country's independence. The Statue of Liberty was designed by Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi, which her face was modeled after his mother and the body modeled after a prostitute as the story is told. Gustave Eiffel, who is most famous for building the Eiffel Tower in Paris, built the steel framework of the Statue of Liberty and the completed 305-foot statue with pedestal was fully erected in 1886 on Liberty Island outside of New York City.

 

Quick Fact: Number Six

Chinatown located in the lower part of Manhattan was established in the 1870s by Chinese immigrants who decided to settle in New York City and brought their ancient traditions creating one of the largest Chinatowns in the United States. Visitors can shop until they drop at one of the hundreds of shops or stores scattered throughout the city within a city. Chinatown is chalk full of historical landmarks including a statue of Lin Ze Xu and The Church of the Transfiguration, the oldest Catholic Church building in New York City built in 1801.

 

Quick Fact: Number Seven

Grand Central Station

Grand Central Station was designed by John B. Snook a world famous architect that Cornelius Vanderbilt commissioned to design the railway station in 1869. In 1902, a horrific accident occurred in the Park Avenue tunnel taking the lives of seventeen people, because the smoke from the increased steam engines traveling through created poor visibility that led to the accident. In 1910, the use of steam engine trains were outlawed and replaced with electrified railway system that is still in use today.

 

Quick Fact: Number Eight

Ellis Island

Ellis Island was originally built just off the southern tip of Manhattan on 27 ½ acres of land, just prior to the War of 1812. Later in the island's history it was used as the gateway to freedom and a new life in the United States, where more than 12 million people from around the world immigrated into the US. Now, Ellis Island is an Immigration Museum that is part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument and hosts an enormous archive of documents, photos and artifacts that tells the story of new beginnings of the men, women and children that passed through its gates, so to obtain the promise of freedom that America has offered to millions of people then and since.

 

Quick Fact: Number Nine

The Empire State Building is a towering 1253 foot skyscraper that has 73 elevators and took only one year and forty-five days to build from bottom to top. The classic film King Kong made in 1933, immortalize the Empire State Building in movie icon history and since then it has been featured in dozens of films and movies that only further cements its legacy in architectural history.

 

Quick Fact: Number Ten

The United Nations Headquarter

The United Nations Headquarters is located on Manhattan's eastern border on an eighteen acre plot of land that was purchased and later donated to the United Nations by billionaire John D. Rockefeller Jr. The entire area was eventually used to build the International meeting center and is actually considered International territory that does not officially belong to the United States and is governed by the International body of the UN.