How to build a tongue and groove shed door,free router woodworking projects,simple birdhouse design,cape cod chair plans metric - PDF Review

Published : 31.12.2014 | Author : admin | Categories : Ikea Storage Shed
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Be the first to know about This Old House contests, sweepstakes, and events and receive special offers and promotions from your favorite home improvement brands. NOTE: This complete plan-set with additional information can be purchased in downloadable PDF format free of advertising and print friendly for only $5. Use 150x25 (1x6) tongue-and-groove lumber for the vertical door slats and 100x25 (1x4) for the door bracing.
The width of the rectangular panel will be wider than the required door width at this stage. If the shed is situated in a windy area and there are concerns, then additional securing measures should be taken. 1.) Concrete a pile or post into the ground under each corner of the shed and fasten to the bottom plate with a metal strap or similar type of fastener. Some of the cool and useful food, craft and sustainability skills that your grandparents knew, but probably didn't teach you! There was a bit of head-scratching, and a few minutes more spent getting the splinters out from under my fingernails, before I realised what I could do. If you compare it with other ledge and brace doors, you’ll notice this is a modified design.
I replaced them with some ordinary door hinges, of the kind that doesn’t require you to cut a rebate into the frame.


It’s important to think about where the hinges will attach to, on both the door and the frame. Turns out the frame is just behind, so I bought a couple more boards to act as a part-frame, which I attached with long screws through the inner cladding and into the frame. Offering up the second (larger) door it was clear I was going to have to trim a few mm off the edge for it to fit. Fitting the upper two doors was very much like the lower two, but less close to the ground. On closing them for the first time (one at a time), one of the ledges prevented the other door from closing, so we cut a bevel into it.
Most of the time we won’t need the full width of the door so will only open the larger half.
A couple of door stops (not yet fitted at the time of writing) will complete the security, preventing the larger half of the door from being forced inwards when the shed is unattended. After the doors have had time to settle (a few weeks) I will have a good look at them and see if I need to adjust or re-trim anything. It’s been so much fun having these guest blog posts from Ross – and they seem to have been appreciated, too! This entry was posted in Craft, Design-and-build, Guest Blogger, Housekeeping, How-to, Make-and-do and tagged blogosphere, country skills, craft, home, home produce, how-to, make-and-do, old-school by Kate's Country Skills.
Hinging the doors to the surrounding trim (door casing) allows for the doors to be able to open 180°.
Wind: It is presumed that this shed will be tucked away in a sheltered part of the back yard without any real concern about the wind, and because it is a heavy and solid structure, it is highly unlikely that it is going to blow away under normal conditions. But if I made a pair of ledged and braced doors, I’d still have the same problem getting the parts home from our local DIY barn as the wood would be too long to fit in the car. Traditionally the ledges would both be a little distance in from the top and bottom of each door.
We just marked these with a pencil and steel rule, then sawed as close as we could to the line (fixing up later). For efficiency we painted only the outward faces at this point (we have still to paint the shed exterior, after all) – in a less clement climate you might be well advised to paint all of it before hanging to try and prevent damp getting in and warping the wood to next week and back again.


No worries – just have to chisel away a small section of the plywood edge so I could attach the hinges properly into the stud and not foul their pins. I had bought four heavy-duty tower bolts for securing the doors to each other and the frame, so I used one of them to keep the doors from swinging freely, then called it a night. I fitted a tower bolt vertically at the top and bottom half of the smaller pair to secure them.
I may yet fit one on ours – depends how much I remove after it has had time to settle. A thick door, or one thickened by ledges and other attachments flush with the edge, is harder to swing than a thin one. We got some professionals in to remove and dispose of it properly, and then had a local builder come and reclad the shed in plywood. In short, you lay out some planks side-by-side, then nail or screw two horizontals and a diagonal to keep them together, and there’s your door. That is to say, a pair of doors with the ability to swing independently but which fill the frame vertically. For an outward-opening door, it was only going to be possible to put these on the outside of the door, with the screws exposed to all comers: no good for security. Worse, the rebates I cut were sufficiently deep that when closing the doorlets fully the pressure tried to rip the hinges off! I should point out that, between my partner and I, we have limited tools, skill and experience. These were going to have to go into a door frame, the shed’s timber framing, or something securely attached thereto. I am reticent to take more off yet until the doors have hung for a couple of weeks as they may settle, changing their shape subtly.



Pergola technical drawings
Menards storage sheds


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