Social media statistics 2015 for teens,best social media agency sites,jobs employment pinellas county - Review

17.09.2015
African-American and Hispanic youth report going online with greater frequency than white teens.
Youth from well-to-do families go online more frequently than youth from the least wealthy households; nearly all (93%) teens from homes earning more than $30,000 annually go online daily, compared with 86% of those from households earning $30,000 or less. In a testament to the shifting landscape of texting, one third (33%) of teens with cell phones use messaging apps like Kik or WhatsApp. Among teens with cell phones, those from less well-off families are more likely than others to report that they simply don’t send text messages.
Online pinboards are sites like Pinterest or Polyvore where users can “pin” online content to create highly visual displays of images and information for inspiration, purchase or construction. Nearly three-quarters (72%) of teens play video games online or on their phone — 84% of boys and 59% of girls — play such games.
Some 47% of teens talk with others over video connections such as Skype, Oovoo, Facetime and Omegle. When asked about seven specific sites (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Tumblr, Google+ and Vine), and given the option to report another site used, 89% of all teens reported that they used at least one of the sites and two-thirds of teens (71%) reported using two or more sites. Facebook is the most popular of all the social media platforms included in the survey, with 71% of all teens saying they use Facebook.
Teens from somewhat less well-off households are more likely to report using Facebook than teens from wealthier homes; 77% of teens from families earning less than $50,000 annually use Facebook, while 68% of teens from households earning more say they use the platform.
Use of Instagram is not just confined to teens; 21% of American adults use the photo and video sharing platform.
Snapchat is another relatively new photo and video focused sharing app that teens have embraced in the last two and half years.
Among teens who use Twitter, the typical Twitter user has 95 followers — though 44% of teen Twitterers are not sure how many followers they have. Google+ is a social network that comes as a part of a suite of Google-offered tools through an account on the service.
And teens from families with somewhat lower levels of education (parents with a high school diploma or some college experience) are more likely to use the service (35%) than teens from families with parents with a college degree, where a bit more than one quarter (27%) of teens report a Google+ account.
Roughly one quarter of teens (24%) use Vine, an app that allows users to record and share short, six-second videos. When asked to rank social media sites by their frequency of use, Facebook is the platform that teens report that they use most often, with 41% of youth saying they use it most. The youngest teens — the 13-year-olds — divide their loyalties between Facebook and Instagram, with a bit more than a quarter of teens this age reporting they use each of these platforms most often.
Boys are more likely than girls to give Facebook as their most visited site, with 45% of boys reporting that, compared with 36% of teen girls. When asked to think about how much overlap they have with various friends on the different social networks they use, the largest group of teens who use multiple social media platforms report that there is “some” overlap in their friends on the different sites. Teens who use more than one social media platform and come from households earning less than $75,000 per year are more likely to say they have the same friends across all of their networks, with 35% of teens in these income brackets reporting the same friends, compared with 23% of teens from the wealthiest homes. In our previous reports our data collection methods allowed us to report a figure for percent of American teens who use the Internet. Aided by the convenience and constant access provided by mobile phones, 92% of teens report going online daily — with 24% using the internet “almost constantly,” 56% going online several times a day, and 12% reporting once-a-day use. Nearly three-quarters (73%) of teens have a smartphone while just 12% of teens 13 to 17 say they have no cell phone of any type. About a third (34%) of African-American teens and 32% of Hispanic teens report going online “almost constantly,” while 19% of white teens go online that often.


Fully 91% of teen cell owners use text messaging — either directly through their mobile phones or through an app or a website. These apps are more likely to be used by Hispanic and African-American youth who own cell phones, with 46% of Hispanic teens and 47% of African-American teens using messaging apps to send texts, compared with one-quarter (24%) of white teens with cell phones. And for the oldest girls (15 to 17), this rises to a median of 50 messages exchanged daily. Some 18% of teens from families earning less than $30,000 annually report that they do not text, compared with less than 7% for those in higher-earning families. There are few differences among teens in use of these online boards by age or gender or any other major demographic category.
Older girls are the most enthusiastic chatters with 54% of them video calling or chatting with others compared with 44% of all other teens. When asked a general question about whether they used social media, three-quarters (76%) of teens use social media, and 81% of older teens use the sites, compared with 68% of teens 13 to 14. Among the 18% of teens who only use one site, 66% use Facebook, 13% use Google+ and 13% use Instagram.
Urban teens report more use of Facebook than teens from the suburbs, with 77% of urban teens on the site, compared with two-thirds (67%) of suburban teens. More than half (52%) of all teens report using Instagram to share photos and video with friends, with girls substantially more likely to use it than boys (61% to 44%). Girls outpace boys in their typical number of followers, with girls reporting a median of 200 followers on Instagram compared with 100 followers for boys. Two-in-five American teens (41%) use Snapchat to share images and videos that are then automatically deleted within a predetermined amount of time — usually a few seconds.
Older teens are more likely to use the service than younger, with use rising steadily as teens age, from just 13% of 13-year-olds using the service to 28% of 14-year-olds and 43% of 17-year-olds. Digging deeper into subgroups of teens, girls outpace boys in numbers of followers, with the typical girl reporting 116 followers to 61 for the typical boy.
Given that schools are increasingly adopting Gmail and other Google tools to use with students in and out of school, many youth have access to Google+ through tools for school work. Instagram is the next most often used social media platform, with 20% of teens saying they use it most often. Less well-off teens from families earning less than $30,000 annually remain more connected to Facebook, with 51% saying they use it most, compared with 38% of teens from wealthier families. Teens from higher income households (earning $50,000 and above) are substantially more likely to report that they have some overlap among friends across their different social networks, with 61% reporting some overlap, compared with 48% of those earning less.
It conducts public opinion polling, demographic research, media content analysis and other empirical social science research. Fully 91% of teens go online from mobile devices at least occasionally, and 94% of these mobile teens go online daily or more often, compared with 68% of teens who do not use mobile devices to go online.
White teens are more likely to say they go online several times a day — the most commonly expressed frequency of internet access across all groups. Teens on the lower end of the income spectrum are also more likely to use messaging apps on their smartphones, with 39% of cell-owning teens from households earning less than $50,000 annually using the apps, compared with 31% of teens from wealthier families. And 53% of Hispanic teens video chat and call, a bit more than the 43% of white teens who report talking by video. Much of the difference between boys and girls is accounted for by the youngest boys (ages 13 to 14) of whom only 33% use Instagram, compared with half of older boys (ages 15 to 17) and more than half of the younger girls. There is little variation in the number of followers between younger and older cohorts of teens.


The differences are even more extreme between younger teens and older; 13- and 14- year-olds report a median of 30 followers compared with 103 followers for older teens. Hispanic teens are more likely to use Google+ than white or African-American youth; 48% of Hispanic youth use Google+, compared to a little more than one-quarter (26%) of white teens and 29% of African-American teenagers. As with many social photo and video platforms, the oldest girls ages 15 to 17 are the most likely to use Vine, with 29% of them reporting use. Fully 11% of teens say Snapchat is the social site they use most, and another 6% say Twitter. More well-to-do teens instead are significantly more likely than the least well-off teens to say they visit Snapchat most, with 14% of those from families earning more than $75,000 saying Snapchat is their top social media platform, compared with 7% of teens whose families earn less than $30,000 annually.
Older teens are more likely than younger teens to list Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter as their most often visited platforms, though for Snapchat this is driven by great use among 15- to 17-year-old girls. Another three-in-ten teens (29%) have tight networks — reporting that their networks are composed of the same people on every social site they visit.
Teens from households that earn less than $50,ooo a year are more likely than wealthier teens to report that they have completely compartmentalized their social network platforms, with no overlap of friends across the different sites they use. Hispanic teens are nearly twice as likely as white teens to use these platforms, with 16% of Hispanic youth using anonymous sharing or question platforms compared with 9% of whites.
Less than 2% (each) report using Twitter, Vine or Tumblr as their sole social media platform. In practice, there are many workarounds that allow viewers to capture images.) By a wide margin, girls and older teens are the most likely to send snaps — with half of girls using the service, compared with 31% of boys. This study does not show statistically significant differences by race, locale or a teen’s socio-economic status. There is a similar pattern by income around Twitter, with the wealthiest teens shifting to Twitter more than their least well-to-do peers. Urban teens are most likely to say they visit Facebook most often, while suburban teens report visiting Instagram more than their urban peers. Fully 7% of households earning less than $50,000 say they have no overlap in friends, compared with 2% of teens from families that earn more. And just 6% of the least well-off teens (those whose parents earn less $30,000 a year) visit anonymous sites, compared with 12% of teens from more well-to-do homes.
Analyzing typical (median) friend counts for different subgroups of Facebook-using teens, we see some substantial variations.
Overall, older teens are modestly more likely to use Tumblr than younger teens, with 10% of 13- to 14-year-olds and 16% of 15- to 17-year-olds using it. Another 4% of teens are compartmentalizers, who report no overlap of friends across the social sites they visit.
Older girls are the most likely of any teen group to use to service, with 56% using Snapchat. Young teens 13 to 14 typically report smaller networks (91 friends) compared with older teens 15 to 17 who typically have 168 friends.
Teens from the lowest income households earning less than $30,000 per year are the least likely to use the service, with 30% of them sending snaps, while 43% of wealthier teens send them. It is significant in the mode of assessment that we use for the other data in this report (and the accompanying charts) so we present it as significant here, but include this caveat.



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