Maintenance manager jobs in california,job careers quiz,san diego jobs shipyard - Downloads 2016

29.10.2015
Average Maintenance Manager salaries for job postings in California are 7% higher than average Maintenance Manager salaries for job postings nationwide. Average Regional Line Maintenance Manager salaries for job postings in California are 7% higher than average Regional Line Maintenance Manager salaries for job postings nationwide.
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Proposition 39 allocates up to $550 million per year for five years for energy efficiency and clean energy projects in California’s public schools, community colleges, universities, and other public facilities. Proposition 39 investments will create an estimated 3,410 direct person-year jobs and 7,843 total person-year jobs annually, including indirect and induced jobs, if $550 million is used for energy efficiency retrofits distributed via grants. If some of the funds are spent on renewable energy installations, the number of direct jobs is likely to be slightly smaller and the total stimulus slightly larger due to a larger estimated multiplier. Leveraging additional financing for energy retrofits and clean energy installations with a portion of the Proposition 39 funding would add jobs in direct proportion to the size of the increased investment.
Proposition 39 retrofits will create an estimated 1,894 journey-level and 379 apprentice jobs annually in the trades.
Proposition 39 retrofit projects will create an estimated 95 entry-level, first-year apprentice jobs annually in the construction trades. California can leverage its rich and extensive existing training infrastructure to meet the training needs for carrying out Proposition 39 projects successfully. There are up to 30,000 school maintenance and operations workers across the state whose responsibilities affect the energy performance of school buildings. Existing training partnerships and curricula provide building blocks for expanded training for energy efficient building operations and maintenance.
Proposition 39 should require performance goals and data tracking for the quantity and quality of construction jobs created and the demographic and geographic distribution of workers, particularly for entry-level jobs. Energy efficiency and renewable energy training for incumbent school employees responsible for the maintenance and operation of school facilities, to ensure that workers can properly operate systems and equipment to achieve the full potential of energy savings.
Funding for enforcement of the public works section of the California Labor Code and Proposition 39 programs should be sufficient to ensure compliance with prevailing wages and other standards.
The Labor and Workforce Development Agency should oversee the jobs and training aspects of Proposition 39 program development to ensure alignment with other ongoing state efforts and to help maximize the jobs benefits.
Proposition 39,2 approved by voters in November 2012, allocates up to $550 million per year for five years for energy efficiency and clean energy projects in California’s public schools, community colleges, universities, and other public facilities. Our job forecast analysis, summarized in Table 1, suggests that about 3,410 direct jobs per year will be created if Proposition 39 funds are all used on a grant program for energy efficiency retrofits.
The studies listed in Table 2 estimate the jobs created per million dollars of investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy, and are scaled up to estimate the impact of Proposition 39. Table 2 documents the range of projections for direct jobs in businesses hired to carry out energy efficiency and renewable energy projects. Estimates for direct jobs are considered quite reliable as they are generally derived from federal government data collected in large surveys of firms.
Table 2 also provides job estimates if all Proposition 39 funds were spent on solar energy installations, showing fewer direct jobs per million but a greater multiplier effect. Proposition 39 investments could create a substantial number of additional jobs, if some of the funds are used to leverage additional financing for energy efficiency retrofits and clean energy installations. Proposition 39 is covered by prevailing wage legislation and therefore is set up to create good jobs with benefits.
An important goal of Proposition 39 is to provide job opportunities for disadvantaged youth, veterans, and other workers in California.
Construction trades jobs are perceived as accessible entry points for disadvantaged workers because they do not require a college degree but can provide, at least in the unionized sector, a career-track, middle-class job. We estimate that Proposition 39 projects will create roughly 95 entry-level construction jobs for first-year apprentices, as shown in Figure 2. California has a wide array of pre-apprenticeship programs that may or may not meet the new DOL guidelines or the intent of AB 554. Pre-apprenticeship program costs range between roughly $4,500 to as much as $15,000 per trainee, depending on the level of supportive services and on-the-job training.49 Our estimate of less than 100 entry-level jobs per year (about 475 over the five-year duration of the funding) suggests a limited need for pre-apprenticeship funding for jobs in projects funded by Proposition 39. Incumbent school employees responsible for the maintenance and operation of school facilities may also benefit from specific training on energy efficiency and renewable energy in order to properly operate systems and equipment to achieve the full potential of energy savings.
Proposition 39 is an opportunity to fill training gaps and potentially build career pathways for maintenance and operations workers in California’s schools. Table 5 estimates annual training needs for key categories of school maintenance and operations workers. Construction should thus be seen as only one pathway to help targeted groups get career-track jobs. Proposition 39 is a large investment in energy efficiency and clean energy in California, allocating $550 million per year for five years for energy retrofit projects in the state’s schools and other public entities. Readers may be surprised at our relatively small job forecasts, which are based on our conservative rule of thumb that 6.2 direct jobs are created for every million dollars of investment. As far as the goal of good-paying jobs, Proposition 39 is likely to be successful because this funding falls under the state’s prevailing wage law.


A bigger challenge is how to address Proposition 39’s goal to help disadvantaged workers obtain employment in good-paying energy efficiency and clean energy jobs. Effective workforce training and education, including earn-while-you learn opportunities, do exist for disadvantaged youth and others, beyond those arising from jobs in the specific energy efficiency and clean energy projects funded by Proposition 39. In conclusion, policymakers and program implementers have a set of tools to influence the quantity and quality of jobs created by Proposition 39, and training and job opportunities for disadvantaged Californians. For jobs and workforce development guidelines for Proposition 39 implementation, see Green Collar Jobs Council, Prop. IMPLAN 3.0 (2010 California data) shows approximately 10 direct jobs per million and 20 total jobs including indirect and induced for expenditures by state government. Ideally, estimates of induced jobs would also include those resulting from redirecting funds previously allocated to utility bills to other spending by schools, but we were unable to estimate this given time and resource constraints. Zabin et al., California Workforce Education and Training Needs Assessment for Energy Efficiency, Demand Response, and Distributed Generation, University of California, Berkeley (2011). UC Berkeley Center for Labor Research and Education analysis of IMPLAN 3.0 (2010 California data) conducted by Laurel Lucia. Leveraging will also reduce the number of induced jobs created from redirecting utility bill expenditures to other uses, because loans must be repaid.
For a breakdown on the numbers and types of public K-12 schools in CA, see Kate Gordon and James Barba, Proposition 39: Investing in California’s Future, The Center for the Next Generation, (December 2012), page 2.
California School Employees Association Maintenance & Operations Counts by Chapter and Employer Including Job Titles (April 18, 2013). We base this estimate on data obtained from the California School Employees Association (CSEA) for maintenance and operations workers in over 700 school districts. California School Employee Association and Association of California School Administrators, California Classified Employee Compensation Survey (2011). Categories are based on our analysis of maintenance and operations job titles for CSEA members. Estimates are based on our analysis of maintenance and operations workers represented by CSEA.
Courses are taught by experts from the skilled trades apprenticeship and journey-level schools, state and federal certified trainers, school district administrators, community colleges and private industry trainers on topics such as OSHA 10 Training and Certification, HVAC Maintenance, Green Cleaning, Electrical Safety, and Basic Carpentry. We also thank Bob Johnson for providing us with data and background information about school classified employees in California. In addition to its goals of reducing the use and cost of energy for these facilities, Proposition 39 states that funds should “create good-paying energy efficiency and clean energy jobs in California.” It also includes the goal of training and employing disadvantaged youth, veterans, and others for jobs in these sectors. We then estimate the number of jobs created by Proposition 39 under various scenarios, based on available research about the job impacts of energy efficiency and renewable energy investments. Improvements in the operation of building systems, such as HVAC and lighting, can reduce energy consumption by an estimated five to twenty percent for an existing commercial building.8 Operations and maintenance practices are the day-to-day activities needed to keep a building operating effectively and keep building users comfortable and safe.
We derive this number using a conservative rule of thumb, based on our review of existing research, that 6.2 jobs are created for every million dollars of investment in energy efficiency retrofit work. The forecast for direct jobs includes only those jobs generated in entities that are the recipient of Proposition 39 expenditures. If all funds are spent on energy efficiency retrofits, the studies suggest a range between 1,375 and 3,850 direct person-year jobs will be created annually. Given the job directives in Proposition 39, tracking the quality of jobs (wages and benefits) as well as the geographic and demographic composition of their workforce is also important. Not all of the new jobs created by Proposition 39 investments are accessible to disadvantaged workers since many of the jobs require specific skills and experience.
Entry into public works and most career-track construction jobs occurs through acceptance into an apprenticeship program.
This is based on our estimate that 3,410 person-year jobs will be created in businesses hired to complete energy efficiency projects and that two-thirds (2,273) of the direct jobs will be in the construction trades. This section assesses the need for new investment in workforce training for workers in jobs created by or affected by Proposition 39 investments. State-certified apprenticeship programs are the main vehicle for long-term, advanced training for these jobs and incorporate numerous industry-recognized certifications. Targeted hire increases access to construction jobs for veterans, local residents, and other disadvantaged populations by requiring that a certain percentage of workers are hired from targeted populations. Policymakers have little influence over the number of jobs per million dollars of investment in any industry, because this is largely determined by its capital-intensity or labor-intensity. These programs, if effective, can help create pipelines into career-track jobs in construction and other sectors, including into higher education and professional jobs. School custodians, construction trades workers, and facilities managers all have a role to play in school energy use and many could benefit from training.
Decision-makers can also help ensure that workers in all the installation, maintenance, and operation jobs that impact energy use have the skills and knowledge to improve the energy performance of our schools and buildings. 39 Implementation: Jobs and Workforce Development Program Elements, Donald Vial Center on Employment in the Green Economy, University of California, Berkeley, (May 7, 2013).
39 and other Energy Efficiency and Clean Energy Guiding Principles and Strategies for Jobs and Workforce Development (December 2012).


Job estimates reported here are derived from estimates of jobs per million of the industry mix from IOU energy efficiency investments reported in Appendix D. DeShazo, Colleen Callahan and Elizabeth Beryt, Achieving Proposition 39’s Clean Energy Promise: Investing in Jobs, Energy Efficiency, and Renewable Resources. This data included job titles for 57 percent of maintenance and operations workers represented by CSEA, which we used to estimate the number of workers statewide in jobs related to projects eligible for Proposition 39 funding.
This report estimates the job and workforce impacts of Proposition 39 investments, including the occupational mix of jobs and the number of entry-level positions. Creating a $50 million dollar revolving fund would result in an estimated total investment of $700 million and an estimated 4,340 direct jobs; creating a $100 million dollar revolving loan fund would result in an estimated investment of $850 million and an estimated 5,270 direct jobs. Next, we examine the related occupations and workforce, focusing on workers in two key sets of occupations that are critical to lowering energy use in schools: the construction workforce who will install energy retrofit and clean energy projects and the incumbent school facilities personnel responsible for maintenance and operations. We forecast that roughly 7,843 jobs in total will be created, including the indirect and induced jobs.
None of these studies have specific information on the jobs created by investments in school retrofits for California.
Table 2 also includes a forecast for total jobs, including the indirect and induced jobs from the so-called “multiplier effect.” Indirect jobs are those generated in the supply chain due to the demand for inputs from the direct investment in energy efficiency and renewable energy. To assess where entry points for disadvantaged workers will be available, it is critical to understand the occupational distribution of jobs from these investments. In occupations related to clean energy and energy efficiency, pipelines into living wage careers include professional careers such as architecture and engineering as well as some white collar sales and other middle-skilled jobs. Although the construction industry is starting to recover, many apprenticeship programs are just beginning to accept new applicants after a period of limited or no openings.59 To assess the need for funding for pre-apprenticeship programs beyond those needed for Proposition 39 projects, data is needed on the number of slots that will open in state-certified apprenticeship over the next five years and the current capacity of effective pre-apprenticeship programs in California.
The directive on jobs in Proposition 39 specifies the importance of “good paying” jobs and improving access to good jobs for disadvantaged workers. The only significant tool policymakers have to increase the number of jobs created by Proposition 39 is to use some of the funds to leverage a larger investment pool for energy efficiency and clean energy work. To that effect, funding can align with and leverage California’s rich and extensive existing training infrastructure.
Proposition 39 is an opportunity to fill training gaps and potentially build career pathways for facilities and operations workers in California’s schools and other eligible entities.
A thoughtful approach to the jobs and workforce development aspects of Proposition 39 implementation can help achieve California’s energy and workforce goals in tandem.
CSEA represents roughly two-thirds of classified school employee workforce statewide, so we assumed the maintenance and operations workers that they represent account for roughly two-thirds of this workforce statewide.
It presents information on workers in two key sets of occupations: the building and construction workers who will be engaged in energy efficiency retrofits and clean energy installations, and the school facilities personnel who can reduce energy use through improved operations and maintenance of buildings and their systems. Job numbers can vary significantly depending on the type, size, age, and maintenance history of a building as well as the type of retrofit work that is carried out.10 As a consequence, and as Table 2 illustrates, the job projections vary substantially.
Forecasts of total jobs including the multiplier effect are less reliable as they model the interaction effects within the economy. Proposition 39 names both YouthBuild42 and the California Conservation Corps (CCC) as two possible recipients for training investments.
Recent summer jobs programs in Los Angeles are promising because they include explicit incentives and supports for continued education for participants58. It reports only direct employment effects, and does not include a multiplier for indirect or induced jobs.
Calculations were performed by Bill Lester, University of North Carolina and used IMPLAN 3.0 (2010 California data).
Job creation is expressed in person-year jobs, defined as one full-time, one-year job–not one permanent job. For the total jobs created by energy efficiency projects, including the indirect and induced jobs, the studies suggest a range of 6,050 to 11,165 person-year jobs. The California Partnership Academies, high school career technical programs serving at risk youth through drop-out avoidance and support for multiple career pathways, are also a critical part of the state’s existing infrastructure.
It also presents recommendations on program elements that can help ensure good jobs and workforce outcomes. If some of the funds are used to leverage other public or private investment, the number of jobs created will grow directly in proportion to the amount of total investment generated. Job projections would probably rise slightly if we specifically allocated $50 million per year for administration, technical assistance and workforce training because these labor intensive activities result in a higher number of jobs per million dollars of investment.9 However, there is insufficient information to warrant this additional refinement of our estimates. Given the difficulties of forecasting jobs and the wide range of estimates reported here, we urge policymakers to require data tracking on the actual number of jobs as part of the program’s reporting requirements.



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