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24.03.2015
Total nonfarm employment in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Statistical Area stood at 3,390,000 in July 2015, up 121,700 over the year, the U.S. The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of two metropolitan divisions – separately identifiable employment centers within the larger metropolitan area. Trade, transportation, and utilities, the metropolitan area’s largest supersector, added 27,700 jobs from July 2014. Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington’s education and health services supersector added 24,400 jobs, a gain of 6.1 percent over the year. Government employment in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington metropolitan area increased by 9,200 from July 2014. Two local supersectors experienced annual losses of more than 1,000 jobs over the year–manufacturing (-2,800) and information (-1,400).
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington was 1 of the nation’s 12 largest metropolitan statistical areas in July 2015.
Professional and business services registered the largest over-the-year employment gains in 6 of the 12 metropolitan areas–Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Phoenix, and San Francisco. Manufacturing recorded the largest job losses in Dallas, Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, New York, and Phoenix. The Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Statistical Area includes Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hood, Hunt, Johnson, Kaufman, Parker, Rockwall, Somervell, Tarrant, and Wise Counties in Texas.
The Dallas-Plano-Irving Metropolitan Division includes Collin, Dallas, Denton, Ellis, Hunt, Kaufman, and Rockwall Counties in Texas. All of the 11 major industry groups tracked by the BLS improved in the Dallas-Fort Worth area over the 12 months. The professional and business service companies added the most jobs in the Dallas area, adding 30,700 jobs since October 2012.


Leisure and hospitality: That sector gained 11,600 jobs, with more than 80 percent of the increase from food services and drinking establishments.
Total nonfarm employment in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Statistical Area stood at 3,316,200 in January 2015, up 140,800 over the year, the U.S. Effective with the release of January 2015 data, nonfarm payroll employment estimates for states, metropolitan areas, and metropolitan divisions were revised to reflect 2014 benchmark levels. The Dallas-Plano-Irving Metropolitan Division, which accounted for 70 percent of the area’s workforce, added 94,300 jobs from July a year ago, a gain of 4.1 percent.
Both metropolitan divisions contributed to the increase, with Dallas-Plano-Irving adding 18,800 jobs and Fort Worth-Arlington adding 6,100 jobs. Most of the local job gain in this supersector was in the Dallas-Plano-Irving division (6,100). The area’s manufacturing job losses occurred in both durable and non-durable manufacturing industries.
All 12 areas experienced over-the-year job growth during the period, with 9 areas exceeding the U.S. Education and health services added the most jobs in four areas–Boston, Los Angeles, New York, and Washington. Four areas–Boston, Los Angeles, Miami, and San Francisco–recorded no over-the-year job losses greater than 1,000 jobs in any supersector. Employment estimates are adjusted annually to a complete count of jobs, called benchmarks, derived principally from tax reports that are submitted by employers who are covered under state unemployment insurance (UI) laws.
Measures of sampling error are available for state CES data at the total nonfarm and supersector level and for metropolitan area CES data.
The substate area data published in this release reflect the standards and definitions established by the U.S.


The Fort Worth-Arlington Metropolitan Division, which accounted for the remaining 30 percent of the area’s workforce, added 27,400 jobs during the 12-month period, a 2.8-percent increase. Locally, this supersector growth was led by a gain of 10,600 jobs in the retail trade industry, an increase of 3.1 percent.
Suchman noted that among the 12 largest metropolitan areas in the country, Dallas ranked first in the rate of job growth and third in the number of jobs added. The Dallas-Plano-Irving Metropolitan Division, which accounted for 70 percent of the area workforce, added 102,100 jobs from January a year ago, a gain of 4.6 percent. Locally, industry employment growth was bolstered by expansion in each of the three subsectors, led by the addition of 10,600 wholesale trade jobs. Within the financial activities industry, most of the over-the-year expansion occurred in the Dallas-Plano-Irving metropolitan division which added 7,500 jobs, a 3.7-percent increase. All 12 areas experienced over-the-year job growth during the period, with 7 exceeding the national average of 2.3 percent. Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington recorded the smallest employment gain over the year, up 45,900, followed by Washington, up 46,300.Education and health services registered the largest over-the-year employment gains in 6 of the 12 metropolitan areas from January a year ago–Boston-Cambridge-Nashua, Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, and Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale.
Professional and business services added the most jobs in four areas—Dallas, Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, and Washington.Government recorded the largest over-the-year loss of jobs in three areas–Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, Philadelphia, and Phoenix.



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