08.12.2013

Ceiling fan remote wiring diagrams,outdoor light and camera,the most energy efficient ceiling fans forum - Easy Way

Author: admin  //  Category: Kitchen Ceiling Fans With Lights


The first step (as always) is to determine what circuit breaker feeds power to the circuit we are working on, and shut off that breaker.  For a quick review of safety considerations when working around electricity, CLICK HERE. Now that the breaker is off, and the electrical panel is locked (if so equipped) so nobody can accidentally turn the breaker back on while you are working on the circuit you can safely begin working.
If you don’t have provisions for locking off the access to the panel, put a piece of electrical tape over the breaker handle holding it in the off position, and post a note warning others to leave the breaker off. The next step is to remove the canopy of the fan to check on the existing wiring, and plan for the installation of the remote control receiver unit. The white wire from the supply cable will connect to the line in neutral, and the black wire will connect to the live in, or power in wire from the receiver. With all the connections made, we need to tuck the wires back into the box and install the remote receiver in the space available in the mounting bracket. When the remote receiver is installed and the canopy and trim ring are back in place, we can now make our changes in the multi-gang switch box. With the switches back in place, and the faceplate installed, it’s time to check our installation.
Changing a ceiling fan to remote control is an excellent solution for many applications, but especially in a bedroom where the switch is by the entrance door. If you aren’t comfortable and confident in safely completing a project like this on your own, use the box on the left of the page to find a reliable trusted licensed electrician in your local area. This entry was posted in How-To-Videos, Indoor Wiring and tagged ceiling fan, ceiling fan conversion, ceiling fan remote control, fan, remote control. A ceiling fan remote control can offer you many more features than you would otherwise have with just a standard pull chain. Process of Ceiling Fan Wiring Before we start wiring ceiling fan we need to be sure the circuit is “cuted”. I just bought a new ceiling fan and will be mounting it in a place where there is currently no fixture. The wires running out of the right side of the junction box go to the outlet on the other side of the room. The black and black with stripe at the light are for the fan and light to be individually controlled.
I also want to add that you will not likely get enough slack in the wire that goes across the ceiling to make a splice. Back to the switch of concern: I can't tell whether the outlet or switch is the feed from the panel.
In note 3 of the switch info, it says, "This control requires separate wiring for the ceiling fan and fan light kit. I am looking through the fan assembly directions to see if they specify with more clarity the wires that come out of it and attach to my junction box.
The diagrams on this page are for wiring a ceiling fan and light kit often used in a living room or bedroom.
This wiring diagram illustrates the connections for dual controls, a speed controller for the fan and a dimmer for the lights. This diagram is similar to the one above, but with the electrical source originating at the fixture. This wiring arrangement allows for lowering the lights with a dimmer and controlling the fan with the built-in pull chain. Use this wiring when the source is at the fixture and you want to control the feed to both components with the same switch. Use this wiring when the power source originates at the switch and you want to control both the fan and light from there.
The right size ceiling fan for your room depends on more than just the square footage or your area.
As a general rule, you can start with the recommended fan for a given room size as follows: For a large room of 15'x15' or more, choose a ceiling fan with a blade span of 52, 56 or 60 inches.


Usually there is a small sliding switch on the side of the motor housing that will control the fan direction. The second part of this section deals with the wiring of ceiling fans with lights, as shown in Figure 1. For the purpose of the diagrams we assume that if there is only one wall switch it powers the light and the fan is controlled by a switch on the fixture (the reverse is possible by changing the wire in the fixture identified as fan to light and the wire identified as light to fan. These drawings are based on the wiring methods that an electrician would use in new construction.
Twin and earth wiring is required for all installations except those using a double wall control. However, If in doubt with any part of the installation procedure then please contact a qualified electrician.
With this particular fan, a trim ring conceals the four mounting screws that hold the canopy cover in place. There is a 3-wire cable in the outlet box that provides a common neutral (white) wire, and the fan’s light kit is connected to the red, and the fan is connected to the black conductor.
This can be a difficult job to make everything fit, but it’s important that everything fits in nicely and that no wires are pinched or jammed in too tightly so to avoid any damage to the conductors, potentially causing a short circuit condition. Remove the faceplate and the device screws and determine that the switch that controlled the light has a red wire on one terminal, and the switch that controlled the fan has a black wire on one side of it. You can keep the remote on the bedside table, and have access to the light and the fan if needed in the middle of the night, without getting out of bed! As shown in my initial post, the blue switch wire is for the fan and the red switch wire is for the light. Wiring arrangements for an electrical source at the switch and at the ceiling fixture are included, as well as controls for fan speed, light dimmer and a single-pole switch hardwired to control the light with a pull chain. These include a timer to control the fan, a single-pole switch controlling the fan, and an exhaust fan and light fixture wired on two different switches.
The white wire is usually the neutral which is always connected directly to the source neutral, either at the source or through a splice in the switch box. The source is at the controllers and the input of each is spliced to the black source wire with a pigtail. The white wire is no longer used for hot and the source neutral is run through to the switch box to satisfy the 2011 NEC requirement of a neutral wire in all switch boxes.
The source is at the ceiling outlet box and 3-wire cable runs from there to the switch box.
Three-wire cable runs from the fan to the switch box and the source neutral is spliced to the white wire and to the fan neutral.
These fans usually come with a small electrical connection box welded to the side of the housing.
There should be two hot wires and a ground coming out of the timer casing, splice one of these to the hot source.
The light is controlled with a single-pole switch and the fan controlled with a timer as in the previous drawing.
Furniture, normal ambient temperature for the room, and ceiling height will all have an effect on the efficiency of the fan you choose. For a 12'x12' room, go with 44 to 48 inches of blade span, and for small rooms of 8'x8' or so, a blade span of 36 inches should do the trick. This function allows for more efficient cooling in the summer and for circulating heat in the room during the winter.
This means that the circuit could split at this point and run to numerous other devices and fixtures. We only need one of these switched hot wires to act as the master power for the receiver unit. Both switches will have a black hot wire from the same hot splice connected to each switch.


The fan speed and direction will have to be set to the desired position using the pull-chain and reverse switch, and the light kit pull-chain will have to be on as well in order for the remote to work. The neutral from the source is spliced directly to the white wire on the fan kit and the cable, running it through to the switch box.
The source hot is spliced to the red wire which is connected to the bottom terminals on the switch at the other end. With this arrangement the light is controlled with the switch and the fan is hardwired for pull-chain control. With this arrangement, the fan is controlled by a pull-chain on the motor housing and the light is controlled with the switch. The hot source is spliced to each controlling device and the output of the controllers are connected as in the previous diagrams on this page.
If you're installing more than one ceiling fan in a room or hall, set the distance between the two at 2 times the blade span.
With this attitude, a counter clockwise spin will force air down into the room creating a cooling breeze. In most cases sliding the switch down will set counter clockwise spin, while sliding it up will set clockwise spin. If this box is used to split the circuit then there could be many black, white and ground wires connected together.
You only need to completely remove one of the screws on each side, and just loosen the other two that are through the key-hole, or L-slots in the canopy cover to allow it to drop out of the way, exposing the mounting bracket and the fan wiring. The black wire is splice to the output on the speed controller and to the black, fan wire at the other end. The hot source wire is spliced to the white on the 3-wire cable and then spliced to the input wires on both controllers at the other end. The black wire is connected to the top terminal on the switch which runs power back to the fan where it is spliced to both the black and blue fan wires. The black cable wire is connected to the top terminal on the switch and spliced to the black and blue wires at the fan at the other end. Clockwise rotation will pull air up to the ceiling, disturbing the warm air collected there and circulating it throughout the room to warm things up. The red wire is spliced to the output on the dimmer and to the blue, light wire at the other end.
At the other end, the black cable wire is spliced to one of the hot dimmer wires, it doesn't matter which one. The neutral source and ground are spliced through to the white and ground connections at the fan. The ground should be spliced with a short piece of wire and connected to each device and outlet box that has a grounding terminal.
The neutral from the source is spliced in the switch box with the white wire, and to the neutral wire on the ceiling fixture at the other end. The other dimmer wire is spliced to the red wire in the switch box which is spliced to the blue, light wire at the other end. I will move the switch we are still using to the middle position, keep the switch for the room’s receptacles in the first position, and then use a blank filler plate to fill the position of the switch we removed. In these drawing the brass colored terminal represent the hot side of the device and the silver colored terminal represent the neutral.
Connect the ground to the grounding terminal in the connection box and the ground wire from the fan, if there is one.




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