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Evidence is now surfacing suggesting that these threats of flu contamination were exaggerated by the World Health Organization (WHO) due to pressure from big pharmaceutical companies around the globe.
But, aren’t the vaccines still invaluable to the people who contract the flu, you might ask? According to an article in the March-April 2010 issue of Nexus New Times, “The most popular antiviral by far is Tamiflu, a drug that’s actually derived from a Traditional Chinese Medicine herb called star anise.
Roche, the company behind Tamiflu, supported their product and claimed that there were 10 studies proving its safety and effectiveness. The information supplied in this article is not to be considered as medical advice and is for educational purposes only. The power of the pharmaceuticals to influence regulatory health bodies is just out of hand. It refers to inflammation of the stomach and intestines as a result of a virus sometimes called stomach flu . She is only about 7 weeks along and not much of an internet person I thought I would ask about this. When checked, Shutterstock's safe search screens restricted content and excludes it from your search results.
Originally published on December 31, 2012 5:46 am For scientists who study a dangerous form of bird flu, 2012 is ending as it began — with uncertainty about what the future holds for their research, but a hope that some contentious issues will soon be resolved.
At the risk of permanently damaging the triangular trust between big pharmaceutical companies, government regulatory bodies and the common masses, you must be urged to rethink the word “pandemic”.
Wolfgang Wodarg, the epidemiologist who is chairman of the PACE health committee and former Member of the German Bundestag, “the WHO’s role and its June 2009 pandemic emergency declaration need to be the special focus of the inquiry. The Cochrane Collaboration, the group that reviewed the data behind Tamiflu, could find no further information other than the results of an unpublished study involving 1,447 adults showing Tamiflu was no more effective than a placebo. Personally I avoid pharmaceutical products as much as possible, and stick to natural products. Last January, dozens of flu experts around the world agreed to what was supposed to be a 60-day pause in controversial experiments on the H5N1 bird flu virus. For the first time, the WHO’s criterion for a pandemic was changed in April 2009, as the first cases were reported in Mexico, to make not the actual risk of a disease but the number of cases of the disease the basis upon which to declare a ‘pandemic’.
It’s a potentially fatal concentration of isolated chemical components that have essentially been bio-pirated from Chinese medicine. In addition, a large Pharmaceutical PR company called Adis International announced that they were hired by Roche to ghost-write their data.
It almost seems like the “bird-flu” pandemic didn’t net enough profit, so the “swine-flu” pandemic finished the job—as if public health budgets weren’t already spread thin.


But none of them resumed work as planned because all year long, the debate over the benefits and the risks just wasn't going away. Virologist Ron Fouchier of Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands says he reluctantly went along with the moratorium, "but I've not been a great advocate of it because there is urgency in this type of research." Fouchier gets funding from the National Institutes of Health to study H5N1, which is widespread in poultry in parts of Asia and the Middle East. It would be nice to report that those who sought antivirals (the only alternative to vaccines offered by the pharmaceutical industry) fared better. The aforementioned inquiry called for by PACE may have been an important step back to the path, but our brave new globalized world still has a long walk ahead. H5N1 rarely infects humans, but more than half of those known to have gotten sick with it have died.
Scientists have long wanted to know if this bird flu could mutate in a way that could make the virus start spreading between people and cause a pandemic. So Fouchier's lab experimented with the virus and found that certain genetic changes did make it capable of spreading through the coughs and sneezes of ferrets, which are the lab stand-ins for people.
This discovery provided important new clues about how future pandemics might emerge from nature.
But at the same time, the findings were basically the recipe for creating a superflu — one that might kill millions. That's why a panel of government advisers initially recommended against publicly revealing the details of both this experiment and another one like it done at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. For years, biologists have talked about the question of how to handle legitimate research that might produce information that could be misused to cause harm.
Officials tried, unsuccessfully, to find some legal way of giving the key details only to people who needed to know.
In the end, science journals did openly publish full reports describing the studies in detail. The NIH just held a public meeting to discuss whether, and under what conditions, it should fund future experiments that might make this form of bird flu more dangerous.
Officials have drawn up a set of draft criteria for making decisions, and they want to know what people think. At the same time, government officials are finishing up a review of what kind of lab safety measures should be used when doing this type of work.
Anthony Fauci, who heads the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said after the NIH conference. He thinks this bird flu situation will hopefully get people better prepared for the next time something in biology raises similar concerns.
Because if there's one thing that everyone can agree on, it's that the challenge of potentially dangerous information in biology is not going to go away.Copyright 2013 NPR.


As we close the curtain on this year, let's look back now on an important development in the world of science.
These studies created new flu viruses that critics say could potentially cause a deadly pandemic in people if the germs escaped or got into the wrong hands. NELL GREENFIELDBOYCE, BYLINE: Ron Fouchier is one of the scientists at the center of this controversy.
In January, he and dozens of other flu experts around the world agreed to hold off on certain bird flu experiments.
Other flu researchers and government officials convinced Fouchier that there had to be a pause. FOUCHIER: But I've not been a great advocate of it because there is urgency in this type of research. GREENFIELDBOYCE: Fouchier gets funding from the National Institutes of Health to study the bird flu virus H5N1.
Scientists have long wanted to know if it could mutate in a way that would lead to a human pandemic. So Fouchier's lab at Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands experimented with the virus and found that indeed certain genetic changes made it spread through the coughs and sneezes of ferrets.
But at the same time, the findings were basically the recipe for creating a superflu, one that might kill millions. That's why a panel of government advisers initially recommended against publicly revealing the details of this experiment and another one like it. PAUL KEIM: I think the biggest fear that we had was that in fact these experiments were going on without the appropriate public dialogue.
GREENFIELDBOYCE: Now, for years biologists have talked about the problem of how to handle legitimate science that could be misused to cause harm.
AMY PATTERSON: It upped the ante, both in terms of what's at stake here in terms of public health and what's at stake here in terms of potential risks. GREENFIELDBOYCE: All year the debate raged over whether the benefits of this research were worth the risks.
Officials tried, unsuccessfully, to find some legal way of giving the key details only to people with the need to know.



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