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There were 64,340 live births registered in New Zealand in the December 2008 year, up 300 (less than 1 percent) from the December 2007 year. During the December 2008 year, the births of 33,100 boys and 31,240 girls were registered to mothers resident in New Zealand.
Live births registered in the December 2008 quarter totalled 15,830, a decrease of 200 (1 percent) compared with the December 2007 quarter (16,030).
Between the 1998 and 2008 December years, fertility rates for women of all ages increased: those aged 30–34 by 17 percent and those aged 35–39 by 50 percent. On average, New Zealand women now have children about five years later than their counterparts in the mid-1960s.
Analysis of fertility by single year of age gives additional insight into changes in fertility over the last 40 years. Single-year-of-age fertility rates also show variation in fertility within age groups, especially for women beginning or nearing the end of the childbearing years. The median age of women giving birth to their first child (based on children in the current relationship only) was 28 years in the year ended December 2008 and has been relatively stable over the last decade.
The 2006 Census showed that 10 percent of the census usually resident population identified with more than one ethnic group. In the December 2008 year, the European ethnic group gained 44,530 babies, Maori 18,840, Pacific peoples 10,120, Asian 7,260, MELAA (Middle Eastern, Latin American and African) 1,170 and Other (including New Zealanders) 560. The Auckland region had the highest number of births in the December 2008 year (23,110), accounting for 36 percent of all live births registered in New Zealand. Births increased in 11 regions during the December 2008 year when compared with the December 2007 year. Deaths registered during the December 2008 year totalled 29,190, up from 28,520 in the December 2007 year.
Age-standardised death rates provide an alternative summary of the mortality experience of populations with very different age structures.
It is important to note that standardised death rates can only be used to compare mortality trends for populations that have been standardised against the same standard population. Maori life expectancy is significantly lower than life expectancy for the total population. Life tables for other ethnicities, such as the broad Pacific and Asian ethnic groups, have not been produced because of the small number of death registrations and the uncertainty associated with ethnic identification and measurement. During the December 2008 year, the number of infant deaths (under one year of age) registered in New Zealand totalled 320. Neonatal deaths (under four weeks of age) made up 58 percent of infant deaths in the December 2008 year.
During the December 2008 year, there were 7,400 deaths of residents in the Auckland region.
More information about regional mortality can be found in Statistics NZ's report New Zealand Life Tables 2000–2002.
The vital statistics and infant mortality rates for the December 2008 year quoted above, and contained in the appended tables, are final. The time series that were previously available only to subscribers in INFOS are now available free of charge in the new online database Infoshare. The latest figure is 10 percent higher than the annual average of 58,300 births per year over the last decade, when the number of births varied from a low of 54,020 in the December 2002 year to this year's high of 64,340.
Normally, there are more boys born than girls, with an average of 105 boys born for every 100 girls. The level required by a population to replace itself in the long term, without migration, is 2.1 births per woman.


Compared with the December 2007 year, there were more births to women in most age groups, except those aged under 15 years, 30–34 years and 40–44 years. However, between 2007 and 2008, fertility rates for women aged 25–29 and 30–34 decreased by 1 percent. The median age (half are younger and half older than this age) of New Zealand women giving birth is now 30 years, compared with 25 years in 1968. In 2008, women aged 20–24 years made up 23 percent of women having their first birth, compared with 13 percent of women who had had a previous birth. Birth registrations for the December 2008 year show that 13 percent of mothers and 25 percent of babies identified with more than one ethnic group. Ten regions had higher percentage increases in birth numbers than the average for New Zealand (less than 1 percent). The median age at death in the December 2008 year was 77 years for males and 83 years for females, compared with 72 for males and 78 for females in 1988.
Because the crude death rate is influenced by the age structure of the population, it does not provide a true measure of the trends in mortality. They are calculated by applying the age-specific death rates of the subject populations to a standard population. Life tables give a more accurate and detailed description of the mortality experience across populations and time. The infant mortality rate (infant deaths per 1,000 live births) has dropped over the last 40 years. Although the Auckland region is home to approximately one-third of New Zealand's population, it only accounted for about one-quarter of New Zealand's deaths. The reasons for subnational differences in longevity and mortality are difficult to identify precisely and are probably due to a combination of interrelated factors, including the proportion of the population who are Maori, the proportion of the population who smoke (or have smoked), the proximity to health and hospital services, the degree of urbanisation and socio-economic factors. Updated regional life tables will be released in the first half of 2009 as part of the report New Zealand Period Life Tables (2005–2007). Fertility rates and crude death rates for the December 2008 quarter and year are provisional.
However, fertility rates of close to or higher than 2.1 births per woman need to be sustained over many years before 'replacement level' fertility can be claimed.
In 2008, women aged 30–34 years still had the highest fertility rate (126 births per 1,000 women aged 30–34 years), followed by those aged 25–29 years (112 per 1,000) and 20–24 years (78 per 1,000). Fertility rates for women aged 40–44 years dropped from around 20 births per 1,000 in the early 1960s to around 4 per 1,000 in the mid-1980s, before increasing to 14 births per 1,000 in 2008. Although there has been a significant increase in the median age since the 1970s, it has been relatively stable (around 30 years) since 2002. Women aged 24 years had the highest fertility rate (254 births per 1,000 women aged 24 years) followed closely by those aged 23 years (251 per 1,000). However, within this age group, fertility rates increase with age, from 5 births per 1,000 women aged 15 years, to 65 births per 1,000 women aged 19 years. One-quarter (25 percent) of first-time mothers were aged 25–29 years and 23 percent were aged 30–34 years, compared with 23 and 33 percent, respectively, for women who had had a previous birth.
Maori women giving birth tend to be younger, with a median age of 26 years in the December 2008 year. Together, these four regions accounted for just over two-thirds of all live births registered in the December 2008 year. These regions were West Coast (up 12 percent), Marlborough (up 11 percent), Gisborne (up 3 percent), Waikato (up 3 percent), Manawatu-Wanganui, Hawke's Bay and Bay of Plenty (all up 2 percent), and Wellington, Otago and Tasman (all up 1 percent). Only 5 percent of the deceased were aged under 40 years in the December 2008 year, compared with 9 percent in 1988.


For example, the crude death rate for the Maori population was 4.4 in the December 2008 year, much lower than the total population.
They give the overall death rate that would have prevailed in a standard population if it had experienced the age-specific death rates of the subject populations. This is 1 percent lower than the 35,520 natural increase recorded in the December 2007 year.
Auckland's large share of New Zealand's natural increase is due to the small number of deaths relative to the number of births and the size of its population. These include the quarterly birth and death counts, crude birth and death rates, infant mortality rate and total fertility rate.
In 1968, women aged 20–24 years had the highest fertility rate (218 per 1,000), followed by those aged 25–29 years (208 per 1,000) and 30–34 years (107 per 1,000). Among women aged 40–44 years who registered a baby in the December 2008 year, around two-thirds were aged 40 or 41 years.
By 1988, fertility rates for women of all ages had fallen and the total fertility rate had dropped to 2.10 births per woman.
Conversely, for women aged 40–44 years there is a significant decline in fertility with increasing age, from 28 per 1,000 at age 40 years to 4 per 1,000 at age 44 years. Two-thirds of Maori babies and one-half of Pacific babies belonged to multiple ethnic groups, compared with just under one-third of babies within the European and Asian ethnic groups.
The median age for Pacific, Asian and European women was 27, 30 and 31 years, respectively. Using the mean estimated population for the December 1961 year as the standard population results in a standard death rate for the total population of 4.1 deaths per 1,000 mean estimated population for the December 2008 year. Only 10 percent of the Auckland region's population is aged 65 years and over, compared with 13 percent for the national population. Current annual series (for March, June, December and December years) will continue to be published in the quarterly Hot Off The Press. In the December 2008 year, the fertility rate for women aged 15–19 years was 33 births per 1,000, half the 1968 rate (66 per 1,000).
Women aged 32 now have the highest fertility rate (131 per 1,000) just topping women aged 30 and 31 years (both 130 births per 1,000).
Only 4 percent of the Maori population is aged 65 and over, compared with 13 percent for the total population. Quarterly birth and death rates are no longer available because they do not accurately reflect seasonal changes, while quarterly birth and death counts are still available in Infoshare. Decreases in the number of births to women aged under 25 years accounted for around 60 percent of the drop in the total fertility rate.
Fertility rates for women aged between 31 and 41 years are now higher than in 1968, but rates have declined for all other ages. This means that once the younger age structure of the Maori population is taken into account, the Maori death rate is significantly higher than that of the total population.
The 2006-base national population projections show that natural increase is likely to decline over the next 50 years.
In 1988, women aged 27 years had the highest fertility rate (153 per 1,000), followed closely by those aged 26 and 28 years (both 150 per 1,000).



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