Twenty years ago I built and used a shaving horse based on the one in John Alexander’s Make a Chair from a Tree (Astragal Press). Here are your search results for shave horse free woodworking plans, project instructions and blueprints.The Internet's Original and Largest free woodworking plans and projects links database.
TwitterContact us if you want us to link to your free woodworking plans or if you want to advertise on this web site. Few woodworking experiences are as sweet as working wood that's just been split from a recendy felled tree. Brian had developed a new feature: an adjustable, ratcheting work support (see photo at right). All that sounds quite complicated, but this sharing horse is as easy to operate as stepping on the brake in your car. 1AII of the parts for this shaving horse can be cut from southern yellow pine construction lumber. 3 Stand the two back legs together as a mating pair, then lay out the same cut on each leg, going in opposite directions. You can make this shaving horse out of any strong wood, such as oak, ash, hard maple or Douglas fir.
The Complete Guide To Wood FinishingWood finishing can be tricky and after spending hours on building your project you want to be sure that you get the best outcome possible. This wood shaving machine is designed to produce wood shavings in desired and suitable size to be able to use them as bedding at chicken farming and horse breeding sectors.
There are all adjustment possibilities to get wood shavings in desired size and high quality. The aim is to utilize wastage wood pieces and to get alternative income for the companies in woodworking industry. Chicken farming and horse breeding companies would also get a chance to produce their own wood shavings needs in desired quality, size, and amount with our shaving machine.
By Tom Caspar Few woodworking experiences are as sweet as working wood that’s just been split from a recently felled tree. American Woodworker magazine was acquired by F+W Media (parent company of Popular Woodworking) in 2014.
An adjustable bevel gauge set at a slope of 3 (vertical) to 1 (horizontal) on the flare angle line with the bevel blade aiming at the center of the proposed post mortise determines the bit’s direction.
The treadle throat opening is the vertical distance between the top of the work surface when resting upon the bench and the bottom of the yoke.
The 1" dowels on both the yoke and foot bar can be turned or whittled.  Because of the two cross members are removable, the treadle frame is easily broken down. When John later improved his shaving horse, I copied and adapted his newer version for use in my joiner’s shop at Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth, Massachusetts. When I started thinking about how to make one I turned to Drew Langsner, an expert in green woodworking (that's Drew, at left). Drew suggested a futiier change: use a treadle instead of the traditional cross bar for applying foot pressure.
It's primarily used to work green wood with a drawknife, which cuts on the pull stroke, or a spoke-shave, which you can push or pull.
It only takes a few seconds to release die clamping pressure on a workpiece, reposition it, and go back to making those glorious, huge curls.
It's a durable, strong wood that's relatively inexpensive, but you could substitute many other hardwoods, such as maple or oak. Adjust your miter saw to a 15-15 compound angle, then place the blank to the left of the blade and cut the right end. Tom Donahey uses southern yellow pine construction lumber because it's economical, strong and relatively lightweight.
These pieces take a lot of stress, so he uses hard maple for the pivot piece (K) and sycamore for the ratchet (F). Baltic birch plywood for the work support (Q), seat (R), treadle (S) and treadle cleat (T). In The Complete Guide To Wood Finishing you will learn how to get beautiful, professional results no matter what your project is, even if you have never tried your hand at wood finishing before. DIYTrade accepts no responsibility whatsoever in respect of such content.To report fraudulent or illegal content, please click here. It’s primarily used to work green wood with a drawknife, which cuts on the pull stroke, or a spokeshave, which you can push or pull. Tom Donahey uses southern yellow pine construction lumber because it’s economical, strong and relatively lightweight. Drill holes in the levers (D) and notch their bottom ends to receive the treadle support (N).


Build the seat using plywood, foam rubber and leather or other durable upholstery material. Here, in a secluded hardwood cove just off the Appalachian Trail, master craftsman Drew Langsner has offered intimate classes on working green wood at his school, Country Workshops, since 1978. Wood is wonderful !    This web page is based on an article by John Alexander originally published in the magazine WOODWORK No. I use the shaving horse mostly for preparation of turning stock and working various short lengths of  “stuff” in the course of making the furniture used in Plimoth’s recreated 1627 houses.  For various reasons, I wanted an all-wood shaving horse, so I’ve changed a couple of things about the example John describes in his article. Updated daily, there is a lot to offer.Below you will find categories and links to woodworking resources across the Internet.
Drew has been an inspiring instructor of the craft for over thirty years, and runs Country Workshops, a school in North Carolina (see Country Workshops, page 66). The design of this shaving horse is rather unusual, mixing traditional elements and modern engineering. The work support will click into one of eight different height positions, to accommodate thick or thin work. He's figured out a way to get virtually all the parts of a shaving horse from one 10 ft.-long 2x10 (Photo 1, left, and Fig.
Temporarily screw these boards together, then drill holes for the leg-mounting bolts and other parts. It rotates on a dowel passing through the rails; an elastic cord provides spring tension, allowing the pivot to click into the ratchets on the work support column. My version requires slightly more effort to make, but it is not all that difficult to produce. Simple utilitarian items, such as chairs, benches, rakes and so on, have long been made from green wood.
Drew introduced me to Tom Donahey, who makes shaving horses for students at the school and also sells them on the school's website.
I took a class from Brian Boggs, the well-known chair-maker from Berea, Kentucky, and he had brought along his own shaving horse. A wood that's hard to dent, such as maple or white oak, is preferable for the rotating jaw (L), which clamps down on a work-piece. Tom Donahey uses bolts and dowels to fasten together the major parts of the horse, which allows the user to take it apart for storage, transportation, modification or maintenance.
This horse is easy to disassemble and store when not in use, as all the parts just bolt together. Use a hardwood that’s hard to split, such as sycamore or hard maple, for the piece that receives the ratchets. This way, you can easily adjust the seat’s position to a comfortable distance from your workpiece.
At Country Workshops, you’ll find yourself splitting out project parts from a recently felled oak log, sitting at a shaving horse learning to use a drawknife and spokeshave, or crouching in front of a hot steambox ready to pull out parts for bending. Secure a flat piece of inner tube or rubber roofing underneath the seat to prevent sliding. A few of the components are turned on a lathe, but these could be shaved or whittled as well. All you need are a few basic tools and one essential device for holding the work: a shaving horse. Alternatively, you could glue the parts together for a classier look, but that would limit your options for making modifications.1. Typical classes include ladderback chairmaking, making a post-and-rung rocking chair (see the class photo, below, with instructor Tom Donahey), carving bowls and spoons, American Windsor chairmaking, Japanese woodworking, and woodworking for women.
After you have made the bench and work surface, mock up a treadle frame from furring strips to make sure that your arms are comfortable.
The yoke should rotate freely enough so that when it is lowered it will slap down on the work surface. Instead of using an eye bolt as the work surface pivot, I substituted a wooden block tenoned through a mortise in the workbench.
Without these holes, the bolts will be too short to fully thread through the nuts (although you could use longer bolts and skip the washer holes).
All of the parts for this shaving horse can be cut from southern yellow pine construction lumber.
If you use southern yellow pine construction lumber, chances are that it's neither flat nor straight.
When I started thinking about how to make one I turned to Drew Langsner, an expert in green woodworking (that’s Drew, above). If you use southern yellow pine construction lumber, chances are that it’s neither flat nor straight.


It’s a durable, strong wood that’s relatively inexpensive, but you could substitute many other hardwoods, such as maple or oak. Drew has been an inspiring instructor of the craft for over thirty years, and runs Country Workshops, a school in North Carolina (see Country Workshops, below).
Drew introduced me to Tom Donahey, who makes shaving horses for students at the school and also sells them on the school’s website. A wood that’s hard to dent, such as maple or white oak, is preferable for the rotating jaw (L), which clamps down on a workpiece. The rotating jaw may be placed in one of three positions; install it in the upper position for now. A shaving horse is relatively easy to build and extremely useful to anyone who uses hand tools to shape spindles for turning, chair legs, barrel staves, shingles, and the like. All that sounds quite complicated, but this shaving horse is as easy to operate as stepping on the brake in your car. The shaft of the block is tenoned through the bench and secured underneath by a wedge driven through a tapered mortise in the shaft. It is traditionally used with a drawknife or spokeshave, but can be adapted for use with other tools.
It only takes a few seconds to release the clamping pressure on a workpiece, reposition it, and go back to making those glorious, huge curls.Click any image to view a larger version. The pivot is spring-loaded with an elastic shock or bungee cord so that it will automatically tip forward into the ratchets (Photo 9). Again, I’ve substituted a wooden component for the eyebolt that John uses for the treadle frame assembly.
Attach a 6-in.-long cord halfway up the pivot’s front face using a large electrician’s staple.
To fasten the treadle in place, just use a loose-fitting duplex head nail in a pre-drilled hole or a screw (Fig. Saw a v-shaped notch in the upper half of the work support, then glue and screw it to the lower half. I took a class from Brian Boggs, the well-known chairmaker from Berea, Kentucky, and he had brought along his own shaving horse.
The two traditional shaving horse styles are the Continental schnitzelbank or dumbhead and the English bodgers bench.
A bench 52" long works well for most people; a 56" long bench will do for those 6' and over. Grip the free end of the cord and stretch it back underneath the pivot an extra inch or so to some point on the underside of one rail.
A tapered wedge driven through the shaft fastens the entire treadle frame apparatus together. Drew suggested a futher change: use a treadle instead of the traditional cross bar for applying foot pressure. Separate the rails, then clamp each back leg to the appropriate rail and drill through the leg, using the holes in the rail as a guide (Photo 7). Push down on the pivot’s back end and slide the support down between the horse’s rails (Photo 12).
The yoke and foot pieces are made in essentially the same manner as those on John’s example. When you release the pivot, it will spring into one of the ratchets and secure the work support in position.
Make sure the pivot rotates easily; you may have to sand the middle of its dowel to achieve the proper fit. In order to make the legs splay out and rake back, you’ll saw off a wedge-shaped piece from one side of a leg and glue it back to the opposite side. If you orient each leg so that its angled top end leans forward, all you have to do to make the cut using a bandsaw is to follow the one line on the board’s top edge. There’s no need to tilt the bandsaw table, even though the layout lines seem to call for it. To prevent the pieces from slipping when you clamp, nail some short brads into one piece and clip off their heads near the surface.



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