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How to train your dog to walk on a leash properly,pitbull big dog motorcycle,cool things for your dog,photos of dogs jumping in water - Easy Way

Category: Dog Trainer Los Angeles | Author: admin 18.12.2014
Thus, some of the time we needs to put our dog on a leash so that he will not wandering around the scare the hell out of those neighbors.
The most essential thing you need when you are trying to train your dog to walk on a leash is of course a collar with a leash.
Once you see that your dog is comfortable enough with the new collar attached around his neck, attach the leash and get ready to walk him. If you have a puppy or an adult who has never been leash trained, begin with short, positive sessions. If your dog has already formed the habit of pulling on his leash, you must convince him of two things: Pulling will not hasten his arrival at his goal, and walking politely will make you happy enough to reward him.
There are many reasons why dogs pull on leashes, with the biggest reason being that they are simply excited!  Dogs need to get out of the house on a regular basis in order to get exercise and to stimulate their minds.  Going for walks also gives them opportunities for socialization and to familiarize themselves with their neighborhood, essentially creating a visual and a scent-based map in their mind so they can find home if they ever get lost. First, begin by walking by controlling the length of the leash with your left hand and looping the handle around your right wrist for safety. If your dog rushes forward and pulls, IMMEDIATELY stop walking (even if you are in mid-stride) and do not move an inch until your dog comes back to you and the tension goes away.  The SPLIT SECOND that tension disappears, continue your walk.
You can even use treats to reward your dog when they come back to walk nicely at your side! If you feel uncomfortable with your dog meeting strangers, it’s OK to tell them you would prefer they not meet your dog right now.
With consistent hard work, you and your dog should be walking in sync in no time!  Once your dog is walking nicely on the leash, I encourage you to start opening up your dog’s world by taking them to new places and introducing them to as many people and dogs as you can. Hi Cathy and Charles, I’m sending your behavior question on to Jessica as a topic for a future blog. Hi Nicole, Your dog probably has behavior problems because his previous owners didn’t take time to train him.
I have 8 yr old chihuhua & got very tired of her pulling me to smell all the time when I took her for a walk.
Hi Hilary: It sounds like your puppy just needs some more work and positive reinforcement on leash training. Along your walk, bring with you something spectacular (such as a squeaky tennis ball, a rope toy, or just some attention could do just fine!). Counter your dog’s excitement with slow steps and as much eye contact as you can get.
Sometimes we also have to train our dog to walk on a leash so that we can walk him around the neighborhood without having to be scared that the dog will run off.


There are numerous types of collar and leash for dog sold out there but if it is the first time for your dog to get a collar, choose a light flat collar with a light leash. You should be able to take your dog for a walk around the block or into a crowded veterinary office without having your legs wrapped up or your shoulder dislocated. Even if he’s a whirling dervish or major-league puller, there will be times when he stops the craziness enough to let the leash go slack. Give a treat every few steps at first, increasing the distance you walk between treats until he forms the habit of walking at your side without treats.
In other words, when he pulls, rather than simply stopping, turn around and walk the other way. When he takes a few steps in the right place, mark that behavior with your voice or clicker, and reward him. Moving forward is the reward for walking without pulling, so your dog will only get to continue the walk when there is no tension on the leash what-so-ever. If the dog resumes pulling, turn around and repeat the process, essentially playing “Doggie Yo-Yo”.  This teaches your dog that the more he carries on and behaves inappropriately, the further away he gets from what he wants, and the better behaved he is, the closer he gets! It should be tight enough so that you can only slip 2 fingers underneath it (not 3 or 4 or your whole hand).
A dog that is exposed to the world they live in will be a more confident, emotionally healthy and happy dog in the long run. It sounds like your dog needs some active training because something is not totally clicking. I believe it might be defensive, as she was kept in a cage for many hrs a day around other dogs who would torment her. I always stop when she pulls and she will quickly come back to my side, or sit down and wait for me to start walking again – which is great! She is potty trained, but has these strange small accidents where she doesn’t even squat to go but pees in the air while walking! He has 3 trigger spots that this happens and we really don’t know how to correct his, he is not interested in treats when he is on a walk so this kind of positive reinforcement does not work when he is good. It will be easier for the dog to adapt because of the shape and lightness of the collar and leash. Even a pint-sized pooch can take the fun out of a walk if he pulls, spins, and jerks you around, and good leash skills are also important for safety, both your dog’s and your own. In the beginning you should have treats or some other reward for your dog, as well as your clicker if you use one to mark good behavior.


It is a good idea, though, to teach your dog to stay on one side so that he doesn’t trip you as he runs back and forth. In other words, teach your dog that if he tries to pull you toward something, you will stop in your tracks.
In either case, your best option is to take an obedience class or even a few private lessons from a qualified instructor who can help you get your dog under control. BUT, as soon as I take a single step, she bolts forward, sometimes so hard that she tumbles when she gets to the end of the leash (I use the easy walk, front attaching, harness).
We use a pinch collar on his walks which does work but once we get close to the field he has no concept of pain.
When he is properly leash trained, your dog will walk steadily on one side of you with the leash slack. If your dog is determined to get where he wants to go, he may not notice right away that you are playing statue, but sooner or later he will either stop pulling or turn and look at you. If his weaving or circling is wild enough to pose a risk, shorten your leash so that he has to stay on one side of you, and reward him when he does. Like many other aspects of good training, teaching him to do this will require some time and effort, but the payoff is a dog who is a pleasure to walk.
Simply hold your leash firmly, turn around, and walk at a normal speed in the other direction. If your dog is still peeing in the house, you aren’t finished with the housebreaking process. Do not get mad when your dog is whining to get the collar off or when he is trying to take off his collar.
You may have to spend a few days going for short, slow walks, but many dogs figure out very quickly that pulling slows progress rather than speeds it up. Attach the collar to your dog when he is busy doing something else such as when he is playing outside or when he is eating his meal.



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Comments »

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