Source of electricity (world total year 2012) ram,survival forum first aid kit 61-piece,no no hair pro 3 vs pro 5,home security systems 92508 - Try Out

02.05.2016
Figure 1 shows the huge increase in world energy consumption that has taken place in roughly the last 200 years. With energy consumption rising as rapidly as shown in Figure 1, it is hard to see what is happening when viewed at the level of the individual. In this post, I provide additional charts showing long-term changes in energy supply, together with some observations regarding implications.
There was a need to find jobs for returning US soldiers, so that the country would not fall back into the recession it was in prior to World War II. The US had a large oil industry that it wanted to develop, in order to provide jobs and tax revenue.
Major infrastructure development projects were put into place during this period, including the Eisenhower Interstate System and substantial improvements to the electrical transmission system. To facilitate purchases both by companies and by consumers, the government encouraged the use of debt to pay for the new good.
Figure 4 shows that there is a distinct “bend” in the graph about 1950, when population started rising faster, at the same time that energy consumption started rising more quickly.
Figure 5 shows that the first periods a large percentage increases in energy use occurred about the time of World War I. A person can see that in the most recent decade (2000 to 2010), per capita energy use is again rising rapidly. We can see from Figure 6 that per capita consumption of oil peaked in the 1970 to 1980 time period, and has since been declining. Coal consumption per capita stayed pretty much flat (meaning that coal consumption rose about fast as population growth) until the last decade, namely the period after 2000. If we look at the United States line on Figure 7, we can see that the most recent peak in US per capita consumption of energy was in the year 2000. A person would expect energy consumption to be correlated with the number of jobs for a couple of reasons. If changes in international trade caused US wage earners to be more in direct competition with wage earners from other countries, it would not be surprising if a smaller percentage of the US population has jobs, and that median wages dropped in real terms between 2007 and 2010. Figure 10 (below) shows world per capita energy consumption on a year-by-year basis, similar to Figure 7. Figure 10 shows that world per capita energy consumption was increasing until the late 70s, hitting a peak in 1977. These emissions are not on a per-capita basis, but the graph illustrates what happens when the production of goods and services is increasingly outsourced to Asia, where coal is used as the primary fuel.
If we compare the growth of CO2 emissions and the growth of energy use, both on a per capita basis (Figure 12), we see that the CO2 emissions grew more slowly than energy consumption in the 1970 to 1990 period, so the lines increasingly diverged.
This divergence appears to result from the changing fuel mix (more nuclear and more natural gas, relative to coal) during the period.
Even the period between 1980 and 2000 may be misleading for predicting future patterns because this period occurred before the huge increase in international trade.
Another false inference might be that per capita oil consumption has declined in the past (Figure 6), so future declines should not be a problem.
The small amounts of new renewables to date should be of concern to economists if they are counting on these for the future.
The fact that things haven’t fallen apart so far doesn’t give the assurance that things never will fall apart. The opinions of the contributors to Financial Sense® do not necessarily reflect those of Financial Sense, its staff, or its parent company, PFS Group.
I just ran across an interesting article about renewable energy over at the Green Tech weblog. It would take 2,500 nuclear power plants producing 900 megawatts to produce the equivalent of one CMO worth of energy. Even if we decided to pursue one of the above options, it’s important to keep in mind that energy demand is continually increasing. The bad news is that, beyond being non-renewable, these sources of energy also have a number of adverse environmental impacts, and burning more of them at a faster rate is just going to create more problems.
It’s also important to keep in mind that all of the technologies listed above result in electricity production. We’ve done our part, or tried to, by replacing all bulbs with CFLs and trying to conserve wherever possible.


I work for a major oil company and I’ve never heard the expression CMO but it is a good unit!
One of the grandest sights for those coming into the Bay Area is coming over the Altamont Pass and seeing all those huge windmills. So, though we, personally, are generating all our own electricity through solar panels, we also recognize that’s really not the best plan of the future. It’s worth noting that there are a number of conservation, if not renewable, technologies that are starting to look interesting.
This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site (including, for example, the order in which they appear). To get a different view, Figure 2 shows average consumption per person, using world population estimates by Angus Maddison. Per capita world energy consumption, calculated by dividing world energy consumption shown in Figure 1 by population estimates, based on Angus Maddison data. There is also a small spurt about the time of World War I, and a new spurt in growth recently, as a result of growing coal usage in Asia.
One such implication is how economists can be misled by past patterns, if they do not realize that past patterns reflect very different energy growth patterns than we will likely see in the future. Prior to 1900, energy per capita did not rise very much with the addition of coal energy, suggesting that the early use of coal mostly offset other fuel uses, or permitted larger families.
US Non-Governmental Debt, Divided by GDP, based on US Federal Reserve and US Bureau of Economic Analysis data.
Decade percentage increases in energy use compared to population growth, using amounts from Figures 2 and 4. It is easier to see what is happening with individual fuels if we look at them separately, as in Figure 6, below. The fuel that has primarily risen to take its place is natural gas, and to a lesser extent, nuclear.
In the period since 2000, there has been a huge rise in coal consumption in China and in other developing nations, particularly in Asia. Per capita energy consumption for selected countries, based on BP Statistical Data energy consumption and Angus Maddison population estimates.
It is striking that the percentage of the US population with jobs also peaked in 2000 (Figure 8). First, jobs often involve using vehicles or machines that require fuels of some sort, so the jobs themselves require energy. Year by year per capita energy consumption, based on BP statistical data, converted to joules. There was a fairly long period until about 2000 where per-capita energy consumption was on a plateau. Since 2000, the two lines are approximately parallel, indicating no further CO2 savings given the greater use of coal again.
Once international trade with less developed nations increases, we can expect these nations will want to increase their energy consumption in any way that is possible, including using more coal. For one thing, the past drop in oil availability may very well have contributed to the employment issues noted above during the 2000 to 2010 period in the United States. For one thing, ramping up new renewables to amounts which can be expected to make a significant contribution is likely to take many years. In it, they break down the type of investment that would be required to replace the energy provided by a cubic mile of oil (CMO). Apparently the world consumes slightly more than one CMO worth of energy from oil per year, and the equivalent of three CMOs from all energy sources. According to Ripudaman Malhotra, a fossil fuels researcher at SRI International, world energy demand is expected to double to six CMOs within the next 30 years.
Current estimates show oil reserves of roughly 46 CMOs, natural gas reserves totalling 42 CMOs, and coal reserves of 121 CMOs. Consider, for example, that replacing 1 billion incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs only saves 0.01 CMOs per year.
Given that a large fraction of our energy consumption is currently non-electric, we’ll need a lot of other infrastructure changes to go along with this. He's a thirty-something family man who has been writing about personal finance since 2005, and guess what?


One interesting section talks about how the transition from gas to hydrogen technology could be completed for about $150 billion. Opinions expressed here are author's alone, not those of the bank advertiser, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser.
There was a small increase in energy consumption per capita during World War I, but a dip during the depression prior to World War II.
Population increased a bit with the first spurt in energy use, but did not really take off until the second spurt. This increase in coal consumption seems to be related to the increase in manufacturing in Asia following the liberalization of world trade that began with the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995, and the addition of China to the organization in 2001.
The passage of the Kyoto Protocol in 1997 may have contribute to rising Asian coal consumption because it encouraged countries to reduce their own CO2 emissions, but did not discourage countries from importing goods made in countries using coal as their primary fuel for electricity. This was a period where consumers were shifting from oil to electricity where possible, a process that was typically more efficient. Wind and solar contributions are not large enough to make an appreciable difference in CO2 levels. The rapid energy growth allowed much manual work to be performed by machine (for example, using a back hoe instead of digging ditches by hand).
For another, oil issues may very well have contributed to the Iraq war, and even to World War II. For another, new renewables require fossil fuels for their creation, so they are very much tied to the current system. While some countries may continue to grow using coal, other countries will flounder when hit by high oil and natural gas prices. Over 80% of this total energy usage comes from fossil fuels, including oil, coal, and natural gas (see graph, below). These numbers increase further when you add in difficult to extract sources such as tar sands.
Share Your Experience$15,000 Homebuyer Tax CreditBuying Furniture off the Back of a TruckWill Mac OS X Lion Kill Quicken 2007? Part of the population rise after World War II may be related to the invention of antibiotics–Penicillin (1942), Streptomycin (1943), and Tetracycline (1955). Other reasons might include more education for women, and more women entering into the paid work force. I omit broadly defined biofuels (which would include animal feed and whale oil, among other things) used in Figure 2, and instead show a grouping of modern energy sources from BP statistical data.
Thus, the fact that people in the US have jobs raises the demand for goods and services requiring energy.
It was only in the last decade when production goods of many sorts started shifting to Asia and living standards in Asia starting rising that world energy consumption per capita has again begun increasing. Thus, there appeared to be considerable growth in human efficiency, but such growth is not likely to be repeated in the future. Furthermore, there may be Liebig’s Law of the Minimum issues, because most vehicles use gasoline or diesel for fuel and cannot run without it.
It is quite possible that some countries will encounter major difficulties in the years ahead, even though they have so far been untouched.
Use of energy to upgrade water and sewer services, and to sterilize milk and to refrigerate meat, may have made a difference as well.
What I show as “BP-Other” includes ethanol and other modern biofuels, wind, geothermal, and solar.
Figure 2 also illustrates that a transition from one fuel to another takes many, many years–we have not at this point transitioned from away coal, and nuclear is still only a small percentage of world energy consumption.
The precarious debt situations of a number of countries leave them vulnerable to disruptions. Life expectancy in the US grew from 49 in 1900 to 70 in 1960, contributing to population growth.



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