For a visually two-toned instrument, the piano can be a very colourful and complex instrument. I present to you, the Ultimate Guide to Playing Piano, overflowing with valuable resources for playing piano.
Music for Memory, a non-profit organization giving free iPods to seniors with Alzheimers, demonstrates the power of music in this video. Accidentals explained; what are sharps, flats, and naturals– and why should you care anyways?
Everyone learns to read the piano keys differently; I share an easy trick for reading keys that not a lot of people use. The complete guide to intervals: what they are, what you need to know about them, and a list of the intervals from tonic to leading note.
An extensive database of examples illustrating music theory concepts visually and aurally, through existing pieces.
These videos teach you the fundamentals of piano with a small section dedicated to playing jazz.
Learn specific pieces by watching the colours (which represent each note played) on the keyboard graphic in the videos. In this series of piano lesson videos, Joe Raciti teaches by individual chords and narrates throughout the process. Same concept as the above piano tutorials, except you see the actual note names (and in some videos, the notes on the staff) above the keyboard animation on the bottom of the screen. You can set your own speed, see the note names run as you play them, set letter names on the keys, and even transpose the piece so you can learn it in a different key if you want.
No-nonsense, straight forward piano keys flashing colours while the music is playing to show you which notes to play. A thorough article on solving common pianist problems and a few suggestions for warming up cold hands. A list of great ideas from Jenny Boster to help you make the most out of your practicing time. Albert Frantz discusses piano exercises for finger dexterity and technique, emphasizing that technique and musicality is insperable.
This article, by Alan Belkin, touches on technicality, musicality, and performing (briefly). Practice makes perfect– Erika Snipes shares two mantras that got her addicted to practicing. Create rhythm practice segments based on the time signature and level you pick, great because you get a new rhythm practice every time.
Fergus Black shares tips from The Science and Psychology of Music Performance (Lehmann and Victoria McArthur, Oxford UP 2002) and gives solutions to some common sight reading problems. Paul Richardson gets to the root of the sight reading problem and offers solutions for each of the five common problems for sight reading. You have a visual, aural and tactile memory for piano music; Albert Franz breaks up the memorization process and briefly explains each of them. A quick and friendly post by Bonnie Jack on the four main types of memorization you should be using for anything to be completely solid in your memory. Brandy Kraemer explains the Dos and Don’ts for conditioning your hands to maintain your ability as a pianist.
You are what you eat (and drink)– prepare for your performance in more ways than one, away from the piano. Five of University of Chicago psychologist Sian Beilock’s best tips on performing under pressure or stress.
While Edward Weiss wrote these tips for New Age pianists and musicians, they apply to any type of improvisation. Create your own ear training exercise (or use the default) for identifying scales, intervals, or chords; you can save and share it with an automatically generated URL.


A great set of instructions on how to maintain and repair your piano, complete with step-by-step photos. Alright, tuning your own piano isn’t a must-know for most pianists, but you can definitely read up on tuning pianos.
From business tools to legal resources, composing help and more, we’ve got you covered here. Classic piano lesson myths busted by Howard Richman, a pianist and music teacher– the truth might surprise you in a few cases. Great tips to ensure that piano lessons go as smoothly as possible with a given teacher and possible questions you should ask prospective teachers. Grace authors a lifestyle blog about music, travel, self-improvement, and entrepreneurship.
The piano is a unique instrument, with the largest range of pitches of any musical acoustic device. But this is no simple relationship, like that of a vibrating tuning fork touched to your dining room table. The Musician's Guide to Acoustics, by Murray Campbell and Clive Greated, Dent and Sons l987 (ISBN 0-460- 04664-6), pp. I mention this technical study here, because there are so many factors which affect tuning of the instrument, more in fact that a proper tuning can deal with. Now I want to talk about the dilemma which confronts every piano student or professional pianist. To repeat: The pianists faces the dilemma of operating a very complicated instrument with a complex musical program, and often must divert attention to the score and away from the final sound output. Most of us have our piano tuned twice a year, roughly when the house heating system goes on, and when it goes off. I have to say that I have been relatively lucky in the past 5 years to have great accompanists in auditions. Well…except for the one lady who could not play my song and literally stopped three bars into it thus leaving me to sing acapella but coming in at the end with an inappropriate button. Look, buddy, your job is to play what is on the page and what we ask you to and not to argue back and question when I know exactly what I want and need to sing the damn song.
No more auditions for this week as I need a wet nap for my brain and holy water for my soul. Citing various studies, Tara Gaertner explains how music students are less stressed out, have boosted immune systems, and more. Each video focuses on an individual skill, so that you can pick which skills you want to learn. Each book targets specific techniques, and uses different keys and meters so you can learn progressively. The range of categories is so wide that you can learn anything from r&b to folk and Classical. For 15 years, David Hahn endured the consequences (and a great deal of pain) from not warming up. Michael Furstner explains the action and how you can use your hand correctly, complete with photos and diagrams. They’re not intended for performing piano specifically, but they definitely apply to performing piano. Age 14 at the time, she talks about her creative process using flow (what is flow?) and improvises an entire piece based on five cards chosen by an audience member.
The exercises are highly customizable to suit your level– you can even choose the instrument that plays your exercise. The exercises range in type and difficulty; you can choose different levels within each exercise.
In this article, Thomas Mark writes about movement retraining, and how it can help you prevent permanent injury.


We have scoured YouTube to find the 10 best canines tickling the ivories — we think you'll just love our selection. Link us in the comments below to any other musical animals you've seen online that make you smile. Powered by its own proprietary technology, Mashable is the go-to source for tech, digital culture and entertainment content for its dedicated and influential audience around the globe. In the early l9 th century the use of the cast-iron frame for stringing was introduced in the US, which stabilized much of the force of the steel strings, as compared to previous pianos which were plagued by the expansion and contraction of wood members under compression. The instrument itself involves an action with several thousand moving parts, a wood soundboard supported by ribs connecting to a rigid case, and the soundboard itself which under pressure from strings resting on two separate bridges, resounds and transmits the sound to the elastic air medium.
Some of the factors affecting the final sound are inherent in the strings, case and soundboard, others are related to the human hearing apparatus, and many of the characteristics of piano sound are inexorably tied to the qualities of the individual instrument. It seems hardly necessary to mention this, but the wrest plank changes its hold on the pins so slowly over the years, that the gradual loosening may not be immediately apparent.
If you are a light user the action may outlast you, actions are generally well built and very strong, and the occasional sticking key can be dealt with without much trouble. If you ask your tuner how long his tuning will stay correct, he may tell you till next spring or fall, and in a general sense that is right.
If you practice long hours daily on a mis-tuned piano, even one slightly off from a fine tuned instrument, you are accustoming your hearing to hearing mis-tuned sounds and intervals as normal. In this situation he or she (and she actually hears more acutely) ignores the tuning, and fails to rejoice in the lovely sound of a properly tuned instrument. A friend who happened to be there and went in before me (Hi Leah!) said that he was playing something funky that wasn’t even on the page. Kraemer explains what to look for in an electric keyboard, like touch sensitivity (which is often omitted even nowadays). Iron made tuning much more stable, but the case and soundboard have all the propensities of wood to change in response to changes in heating and the seasonal humidities. Tuning can only do so much, even when resorting to intentional mis-tuning of certain tones to avoid annoying overtones in the harmonic series. But in sheer honestly, he should tell you that a week later there will be changes, and in a month it would not be suitable for a concert or a recording. No violinist faces this problem, in an unfretted instrument or with the human voice the mind makes things sound right even as they are made, intervals automatically true themselves, even beyond the compromises of Equal Temperament. Most of us have had to play the piano just as it stands, ignoring ringing sounds until they cross the threshold of tolerance, or until the tuner comes on his schedule. Except for dealing with a Typhoid victim who would NOT stop coughing and clearly had no interest in getting a drink of water, sucking on a lozenge, or just dying to give the rest of us some peace and quiet. So it is usual for pianists who are concerned with keeping their instrument in relative tune to have the piano tuned twice a year, first when in spring the air becomes more humid, and again in the fall when the effect of a heating system starts to shrink wood parts. Compared with this necessary attention to detail of sound, the pianist tends to become a rough and crude listener. And except for the guy who walked around and read the breakdowns out loud to himself and rationalized what role he was perfect for. That will be a very different piano from the piano he has been practicing on while preparing for the concert, it will sound clearer and cleaner, the harmonies will be the best that Equal Temperament can offer, and the sound will be better to his ears. Raising the level of acoustic attention and pleasure should be the aim of any musical endeavor.
Hence the remark of a professional pianist that the only piano he play on which is properly tuned is the one at his concert.
And now I am sitting down to get this out of my system before I truly do kill the next person who leans on me as they fall asleep, steps on my feet, bumps into my twig and berries with their bag, or looks over my shoulder to read my Kindle.



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