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14.12.2014

The diagrams on this page are for wiring a ceiling fan and light kit often used in a living room or bedroom.
This wiring diagram illustrates the connections for dual controls, a speed controller for the fan and a dimmer for the lights. This diagram is similar to the one above, but with the electrical source originating at the fixture. This wiring arrangement allows for lowering the lights with a dimmer and controlling the fan with the built-in pull chain. Use this wiring when the source is at the fixture and you want to control the feed to both components with the same switch.
Use this wiring when the power source originates at the switch and you want to control both the fan and light from there.
The right size ceiling fan for your room depends on more than just the square footage or your area. As a general rule, you can start with the recommended fan for a given room size as follows: For a large room of 15'x15' or more, choose a ceiling fan with a blade span of 52, 56 or 60 inches. Usually there is a small sliding switch on the side of the motor housing that will control the fan direction. More often than not, your going to have a ceiling light fixture at the location you are planning on installing a ceiling fan.
If you are installing a fan where there is no previous fixture, then you'll be running a new circuit to the fan and can accommodate for the light as well.
Although I will be going through these circuits on this page in some detail, I recommend you checkout my other pages that cover 2-way switches and 3-way switches. Some manufacturers may use different color codes so be sure to follow the instructions that come with your particular product. This is assuming that you are installing a ceiling fan in a location that had no fixture there before. Maybe you are just replacing an old ceiling fan with a new one and you already had (2) separate switches.
The catch is I would like switch 1 and switch two to be run to the light and the fan in series together (only one wire rather than running a wire from each switch to each device) I have a feeling it can be done but my question is how? Connect all the ground wires together and to the switches if they have green ground screws.
Connect the red from the cable to the blue wire(light) on the fan.Connect The white from the cable to the white from the fan.
I take it the fan and the overhead light are not the same unit and are seperated by some distance?
If this is new bathroom a 20 amp branch circuit is required for the bath and gfci for the receptacle this circuit cannot supply anything else but this bathroom. Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.Ask follow up questions if you need to. Wiring at the switch was already done and was working The heater went out - the unit is going on 10 years old\And I was just trying to replace it. Do I have the do something special to make the white wire my third hot? Wiring arrangements for an electrical source at the switch and at the ceiling fixture are included, as well as controls for fan speed, light dimmer and a single-pole switch hardwired to control the light with a pull chain. These include a timer to control the fan, a single-pole switch controlling the fan, and an exhaust fan and light fixture wired on two different switches.


The white wire is usually the neutral which is always connected directly to the source neutral, either at the source or through a splice in the switch box. The source is at the controllers and the input of each is spliced to the black source wire with a pigtail. The white wire is no longer used for hot and the source neutral is run through to the switch box to satisfy the 2011 NEC requirement of a neutral wire in all switch boxes. The source is at the ceiling outlet box and 3-wire cable runs from there to the switch box.
Three-wire cable runs from the fan to the switch box and the source neutral is spliced to the white wire and to the fan neutral. These fans usually come with a small electrical connection box welded to the side of the housing. There should be two hot wires and a ground coming out of the timer casing, splice one of these to the hot source.
The light is controlled with a single-pole switch and the fan controlled with a timer as in the previous drawing.
Furniture, normal ambient temperature for the room, and ceiling height will all have an effect on the efficiency of the fan you choose. For a 12'x12' room, go with 44 to 48 inches of blade span, and for small rooms of 8'x8' or so, a blade span of 36 inches should do the trick.
This function allows for more efficient cooling in the summer and for circulating heat in the room during the winter. As far as getting your ceiling fan installed, Please follow the manufacturers manuals and safety guidelines for proper mounting due to weight and other variables which can be an important factor. If this is the case, then odds are that this old ceiling light only has enough wires to switch off & on the fan and not the light.
These pages can help you to determine how your circuits are wired or possibly help you decide how you want them wired especially if you are running a new circuit. It is a small bathroom which doubles as a laundry room so there is alot of wiring and plumbing in the walls as it is. The big thing is how to get my two switches controlling the sepearate devices on one cable. If so and your diagram seems to suggest it, then do exactly as Joe or 221 said run a 2 wire with ground from the light to the fan and connect the red of the three wire cable coming from the switch box to the black in the cable to the fan the white of that cable to the other whites at the fan black to black white to white and ground it. Twin and earth wiring is required for all installations except those using a double wall control. However, If in doubt with any part of the installation procedure then please contact a qualified electrician.
The neutral from the source is spliced directly to the white wire on the fan kit and the cable, running it through to the switch box. The source hot is spliced to the red wire which is connected to the bottom terminals on the switch at the other end. The hot source is spliced to each controlling device and the output of the controllers are connected as in the previous diagrams on this page. If you're installing more than one ceiling fan in a room or hall, set the distance between the two at 2 times the blade span.
With this attitude, a counter clockwise spin will force air down into the room creating a cooling breeze.


In most cases sliding the switch down will set counter clockwise spin, while sliding it up will set clockwise spin. Although you can get just a ceiling fan most units offer a light kit that can be added in the future. Keep in mind that I refer to a load in those circuits which means a light, ceiling fan, outlet, etc..
Chances are, you only have a 3-wire cable ran to the fixture so you would be limited to powering the ceiling fan & light both. I would also suggest you use push connectors at the switch box for the grounds and hots and neutrals. The black wire is splice to the output on the speed controller and to the black, fan wire at the other end. The hot source wire is spliced to the white on the 3-wire cable and then spliced to the input wires on both controllers at the other end. The black wire is connected to the top terminal on the switch which runs power back to the fan where it is spliced to both the black and blue fan wires. The black cable wire is connected to the top terminal on the switch and spliced to the black and blue wires at the fan at the other end. Clockwise rotation will pull air up to the ceiling, disturbing the warm air collected there and circulating it throughout the room to warm things up. Then leaving the double switch box is a 3-wire cable going to the ceiling fan and a 4-wire cable going to the other 3-way switch.
This many wires going into the wirenuts is not easily done by someone not doing this everyday. The red wire is spliced to the output on the dimmer and to the blue, light wire at the other end. At the other end, the black cable wire is spliced to one of the hot dimmer wires, it doesn't matter which one. The neutral source wire is spliced to the white cable wire in the switch box and to the white fan wire at the other end.
The ground should be spliced with a short piece of wire and connected to each device and outlet box that has a grounding terminal. The neutral from the source is spliced in the switch box with the white wire, and to the neutral wire on the ceiling fixture at the other end. The other dimmer wire is spliced to the red wire in the switch box which is spliced to the blue, light wire at the other end. In these drawing the brass colored terminal represent the hot side of the device and the silver colored terminal represent the neutral.
Connect the ground to the grounding terminal in the connection box and the ground wire from the fan, if there is one.



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