32 white ceiling fan with light wiring,replacing a ceiling light fixture with a fan,quiet window fan thermostat diagram - How to DIY

01.02.2016

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Fasteners Hardware and fasteners, including all types of screws, nails, hinges, springs, and other devices you may find in the hardware aisle of your local retailer or supplier. Wiring a ceiling fan and light can seem like a daunting task, but it doesn’t have to be. The main thing to consider wiring a ceiling fan and light is determining how you want that fan to be controlled. Having the right tools will help the project to go smoothly and ensure you don’t get bogged down trying to use, for example, a razor knifed to strip wires, when a pair of wire strippers will do the job more accurately and about 10x faster.
It’s always important to follow the local codes in your area when wiring a ceiling fan and light. This method is often used when you simply cannot run a switch into the room, but you do have the ability to pull power to the fan form a nearby location. This method and the following are the most commonly used since they only require a single light switch. This is a slight adaptation of the above method that switches power for both the fan and the light kit form the wall switch. Note that power is fed through the switch and both the fan motor and light kit are recipients of this switched power source. Keep in mind that, while code makes certain stipulations, there are typically different ways to accomplish a wiring connection. This is identical to situation #3 above, however we wanted to outline the wiring differences when the power is actually at the switch instead of in the ceiling. Hopefully this guide will get you on your way to installing a ceiling fan and making all of the required electrical connections to get it up and running smoothly. When he's not remodeling part of his house or playing with the latest power tool, Clint enjoys life as a husband, father and avid reader.
To post questions, help other DIYers and reduce advertising (like the one on your left), join our DIY community. I'm having a hard time finding a diagram to fit exactly so thank you all in advance for your help!! If you have power run to the switch box, then a run of 12-3 or 14-3 from the switch box to the fan location is in order.
More often than not, your going to have a ceiling light fixture at the location you are planning on installing a ceiling fan. If you are installing a fan where there is no previous fixture, then you'll be running a new circuit to the fan and can accommodate for the light as well.
Although I will be going through these circuits on this page in some detail, I recommend you checkout my other pages that cover 2-way switches and 3-way switches. Some manufacturers may use different color codes so be sure to follow the instructions that come with your particular product. This is assuming that you are installing a ceiling fan in a location that had no fixture there before. Maybe you are just replacing an old ceiling fan with a new one and you already had (2) separate switches.
The diagrams on this page are for wiring a ceiling fan and light kit often used in a living room or bedroom. This wiring diagram illustrates the connections for dual controls, a speed controller for the fan and a dimmer for the lights. This diagram is similar to the one above, but with the electrical source originating at the fixture. This wiring arrangement allows for lowering the lights with a dimmer and controlling the fan with the built-in pull chain.
Use this wiring when the source is at the fixture and you want to control the feed to both components with the same switch. Use this wiring when the power source originates at the switch and you want to control both the fan and light from there. The right size ceiling fan for your room depends on more than just the square footage or your area.
As a general rule, you can start with the recommended fan for a given room size as follows: For a large room of 15'x15' or more, choose a ceiling fan with a blade span of 52, 56 or 60 inches.
Usually there is a small sliding switch on the side of the motor housing that will control the fan direction. I am in the midst of a lighting project where I am installing 4 new can lights in a room that has an existing ceiling fan. I have wired all the lights in parallel, not in series and now just need to run the power and the switches everywhere.
This follows the standard method of using a 2-conductor cable for a switch loop where the redesignated white brings power to the switch. Code note: Beginning with the 2011 version of NEC with minor exceptions you must have a neutral at each switch box even if it isn't needed. The simple way to do this and be in compliance with the 2011 code revisions is to run a second cable, a 3-conductor, between the fan box and the switch box. The wires in the existing 2-conductor cable would be spliced to the wires in the cable bringing the power in, color-to-color. If you want the fan not switched connect the fan black to the live black and the switch white.
As I said that the two room is sharing power, will 15 amp breaker enough to run both room? I have to take off for a few hours so I'll post this diagram showing the daisy chain method, others here can help you if this is still confusing.
Those combination devices usually have a single common screw for the power in and three separate screws for the controlled loads, so only one power connection is necessary.


Ok that being the case you will just connect the single pigtail you already have to the common terminal of the combination device then just connect the switched wires as shown in the diagram. Pro Tool Reviews gives you a visual guide and step by step instructions on making the best connections for your particular ceiling fan installation. It’s certainly an acceptable wiring method and the fans all come with pull string switches to control the fans and light kits. The power for the fan motor will typically be black, while most modern day fans will also have a separate blue wire that supplies power to the lights.
In many older homes there was never any thought to wiring up a second switch since most homes didn’t have a powered ceiling fan.
What this does is allow you to turn the fan on and off with the wall switch (along with the light) without having to walk over and pull the chain to stop the fan motor.
They almost never have a metal inner winding and are commonly undersized, which makes them difficult to use, if not unsafe.
A ceiling fan makes a great addition to almost any room and is one of the easiest projects to complete that can really make an impact in your home and make you look and feel like a real handyman.
The light goes on and off with the switch just fine, but when I pull the chain to start the fan, the fan starts and the light comes on, even if the wall switch is in the off position.
Twin and earth wiring is required for all installations except those using a double wall control. However, If in doubt with any part of the installation procedure then please contact a qualified electrician. As far as getting your ceiling fan installed, Please follow the manufacturers manuals and safety guidelines for proper mounting due to weight and other variables which can be an important factor. If this is the case, then odds are that this old ceiling light only has enough wires to switch off & on the fan and not the light.
These pages can help you to determine how your circuits are wired or possibly help you decide how you want them wired especially if you are running a new circuit.
Wiring arrangements for an electrical source at the switch and at the ceiling fixture are included, as well as controls for fan speed, light dimmer and a single-pole switch hardwired to control the light with a pull chain.
These include a timer to control the fan, a single-pole switch controlling the fan, and an exhaust fan and light fixture wired on two different switches. The white wire is usually the neutral which is always connected directly to the source neutral, either at the source or through a splice in the switch box. The source is at the controllers and the input of each is spliced to the black source wire with a pigtail. The white wire is no longer used for hot and the source neutral is run through to the switch box to satisfy the 2011 NEC requirement of a neutral wire in all switch boxes.
The source is at the ceiling outlet box and 3-wire cable runs from there to the switch box.
Three-wire cable runs from the fan to the switch box and the source neutral is spliced to the white wire and to the fan neutral.
These fans usually come with a small electrical connection box welded to the side of the housing.
There should be two hot wires and a ground coming out of the timer casing, splice one of these to the hot source.
The light is controlled with a single-pole switch and the fan controlled with a timer as in the previous drawing. Furniture, normal ambient temperature for the room, and ceiling height will all have an effect on the efficiency of the fan you choose. For a 12'x12' room, go with 44 to 48 inches of blade span, and for small rooms of 8'x8' or so, a blade span of 36 inches should do the trick.
This function allows for more efficient cooling in the summer and for circulating heat in the room during the winter. In the switch box, the white wires would just be spliced together if you don't need a neutral there right now. Wire the existing 2-conductor cable to the switch as a switch loop - power down on color-tagged white wire and up on black - to control the lights. You can do that on a combination type switch either by daisy chaining from from switch to switch using the backstab holes in the back or by adding two more pigtails to the black wires and connecting those to the two switches for the light and fan. Also assuming this all worked before you added the ceiling fan you simply miswired something and the breaker tripped. If you chose to add pigtails to the wire nut (6 wires total) it will get rather difficult to get all the blacks into one wirenut for most DIY. The black wires I show connecting the switches will not be necessary so just look at them as internal to the switching device.. ON a scale of 1-10, the level of difficulty on this project is a 5, though it can be more complex if you include the ancillary projects such as running wiring through walls, etc.
When working with electricity, always remember to turn off the power, test the wiring with an electrical tester (or voltmeter) to ensure the power is off, secure the panel box so no one can accidentally re-engage power while you are working, and consult a professional to ensure you are doing things correctly and within the specifications of your state and local codes.
While we show a small strip of electrical tape, we recommend actually wrapping it around all the exposed white wire.
There are also lots of really convenient switches that put this dual control into one neat little package.
Jumping means that you strip the insulation away from a small area of wire, just large enough to loop around the hot terminal. Secondly, this method of wiring makes swapping out ceiling fans easy as cutting power at the switch eliminates all power to the ceiling box. What does change is that you can safely deactivate the ceiling fan box simply by turning off the switch. Instead, be sure to grab a small assortment pack at your local home improvement or hardware store. Although you can get just a ceiling fan most units offer a light kit that can be added in the future.


Keep in mind that I refer to a load in those circuits which means a light, ceiling fan, outlet, etc.. Chances are, you only have a 3-wire cable ran to the fixture so you would be limited to powering the ceiling fan & light both. The neutral from the source is spliced directly to the white wire on the fan kit and the cable, running it through to the switch box.
The source hot is spliced to the red wire which is connected to the bottom terminals on the switch at the other end. The hot source is spliced to each controlling device and the output of the controllers are connected as in the previous diagrams on this page.
If you're installing more than one ceiling fan in a room or hall, set the distance between the two at 2 times the blade span. With this attitude, a counter clockwise spin will force air down into the room creating a cooling breeze. In most cases sliding the switch down will set counter clockwise spin, while sliding it up will set clockwise spin.
The white wires of the switch loops must be redesignated as ungrounded conductors (hot) by coloring both ends by remarking with tape or felt tip marker. The black in the 2-conductor would be pigtailed to feed both switches, and the black and red wires in the 3-conductor would be connected to take the switched power back up - say black for the fan and red for the lights. Incoming power is one of the black wires connected in the wirenut that has three black wires in it. All that’s left at this point is to tie together all the ground wires and neutral wires (respectively). You then loop that exposed wire around the hot terminal of the first switch and then strip the end and connect that to the second switch. Note that we still recommend deactivating the breaker and checking your wires with a voltmeter, but it’s worth nothing nonetheless. This is handy when replacing ceiling fans with a similar model, however we still recommend shutting down the breaker, lest someone walk in on you and attempt to turn on the lights! While typically not necessary, we recommend taping any wire nuts after you make those connections. He hopes his efforts at PTR will provide builders and contractors with reliable and engaging tool reviews to help them make better tool purchasing decisions. Then leaving the double switch box is a 3-wire cable going to the ceiling fan and a 4-wire cable going to the other 3-way switch. The black wire is splice to the output on the speed controller and to the black, fan wire at the other end.
The hot source wire is spliced to the white on the 3-wire cable and then spliced to the input wires on both controllers at the other end. The black wire is connected to the top terminal on the switch which runs power back to the fan where it is spliced to both the black and blue fan wires.
The black cable wire is connected to the top terminal on the switch and spliced to the black and blue wires at the fan at the other end. Clockwise rotation will pull air up to the ceiling, disturbing the warm air collected there and circulating it throughout the room to warm things up.
The hot returns are then the red wire and the white wire which you tape black (on both ends) to designate it as a hot wire. Wire nuts are normally very reliable, but it never hurts to add an extra layer of protection to keep them from ever unwinding. The red wire is spliced to the output on the dimmer and to the blue, light wire at the other end. At the other end, the black cable wire is spliced to one of the hot dimmer wires, it doesn't matter which one. The neutral source wire is spliced to the white cable wire in the switch box and to the white fan wire at the other end. I have wired it several times and I cannot seem to get a configuration that the breaker box likes. This is just a good habit to get into and costs next to nothing in terms of time or money to implement. The ground should be spliced with a short piece of wire and connected to each device and outlet box that has a grounding terminal.
The neutral from the source is spliced in the switch box with the white wire, and to the neutral wire on the ceiling fixture at the other end.
The other dimmer wire is spliced to the red wire in the switch box which is spliced to the blue, light wire at the other end. When you install your combination switch in that single gang box you need to get incoming power to each switch.
In these drawing the brass colored terminal represent the hot side of the device and the silver colored terminal represent the neutral. Connect the ground to the grounding terminal in the connection box and the ground wire from the fan, if there is one.
Also, sometimes the power stays on until I flip the switches but i do not understand what I need to do. You can do that by getting two more pigtails and adding them into the wire nut with the blacks then connecting them to the other two switches along with the existing pigtail. If anyone knows how to wire the system I am wanting up I would appreciate some help on where each wire connects to.
Or you can connect that one pigtail to a switch and then use the backstab holes to daisy chain (connect together) the other two switches to that single pigtail.



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