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Manufacturers offer a wide range of bathroom exhaust fans, from simple models with few bells and whistles to energy-efficient models with sophisticated controls.
This isn’t a very logical ventilation method, especially when temperatures are below zero, or when the weather is 90°F and humid. In spite of the code’s archaic loophole, builders should install an exhaust fan in every bathroom or toilet room — even when the bathroom has a window. When operated for 24 hours per day or when controlled by a timer, it can act (in some cases) as the most important component of a whole-house ventilation system. Designing an exhaust-only ventilation system is a topic unto itself, and is beyond the scope of this article.
When the bathroom door is closed and the fan is operating, where is the makeup air coming from? If the bathroom has an exterior wall, some of the makeup air is coming from the exterior — for example, through leaks around the window or baseboard. Some of the makeup air is probably coming into the bathroom from other rooms in the house, via the crack between the bottom of the door and the flooring. Unfortunately, many exhaust fans pull some of their makeup air through a nearby crack: namely, the crack between the housing of the fan and the ceiling drywall. Homeowners sometimes worry that if they fail to operate their exhaust fan, the bathroom ceiling will stay damp and every surface in the room will soon grow mold.
A bathroom that includes a shower that is used frequently is more at risk than a bathroom with a rarely used shower. In cold climates, bathrooms with poorly insulated surfaces are more at risk than bathrooms with well-insulated surfaces.
Just because a fan makes a comforting noise (or an irritating whirr), doesn’t mean it’s moving any air. If you need an accurate measurement of an exhaust fan’s flow rate — for example, to comply with requirements of the Energy StarLabeling system sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy for labeling the most energy-efficient products on the market; applies to a wide range of products, from computers and office equipment to refrigerators and air conditioners.
According to most building codes, a bathroom without an operable window must have an exhaust fan with a minimum ventilation rate of 50 cfm (assuming intermittent operation) or 20 cfm (assuming continuous operation). In the past, many builders and code officials interpreted this to mean that the fan should be rated at 50 cfm. Most green building programs now require that the airflow rate through a bath exhaust system be verified to determine that the fan and its associated ductwork are moving at least 50 cfm. Some green builders have been surprised to learn that their 110 cfm fans are failing the 50 cfm performance test.
In a 2013 blog, Allison Bailes told the story of a developer who installed bath fans rated at 110 cfm in several new Energy Star homes. Fan makers have begun to respond to reports that builders are failing the 50 cfm airflow test by offering more powerful fans. Ideally, you want to keep your maximum duct length to 10 feet or less — 20 feet in a pinch — with no more than three elbows.
If your duct system is especially long or convoluted, or you ignore the advice in this article and install flex duct instead of smooth-wall duct, you will need to specify a more powerful fan to account for the high static pressure of your duct system. Fans rated at 89 cfm or less must have a minimum efficiency of 1.4 cfm per watt when tested according to the HVI 916 test procedure. Anyone interested in researching specifications for bathroom exhaust fans should probably consult the data published in the online directory of the Home Ventilating Institute. It’s important to follow the installation instructions provided by the manufacturer of your bathroom exhaust fan. Verify that the bathroom door has enough of an undercut to allow air to enter the bathroom when the fan is running. Verify that the backdraft damper in the fan operates smoothly, and hasn’t been taped shut at the factory.
Install the fan so that the duct outlet is aimed in right the direction — toward the planned exterior termination.
In many cases, it’s a good idea to install ducts with a larger diameter than the duct outlet on the fan. Verify that the louvers (if any) on the wall termination or roof termination are operating smoothly.
The fan pulls exterior air into your home through cracks, and this exterior air needs to be heated during the winter and cooled during the summer. Because of the energy penalty associated with fan operation, fans should be no more powerful than necessary, and should be operated only as long as required. The simplest way to control a bath fan is to wire the fan to come on with the bathroom light. This can be accomplished with a “delayed off” switch (for example, the Lutron Maestro) that keeps a fan running for a set amount of time after the switch is turned off. It’s also possible to install a humidity-sensing switch that turns a fan on whenever the indoor relative humidity reaches a preset level.
Some fans — for example, Panasonic’s WhisperSense fan — include sophisticated controls that incorporate motion sensors, “delayed off” features, and humidity controls. If your bathroom seems damp, you probably want to run the bath fan more often, or run it longer after every shower. If your bathroom seems dry and pleasant, you may not need to operate your fan as much as you are now.
While the tissue test may be a venerable home inspector classic, it really needs to be retired from the toolbag.
To get around this, on the last two houses I built I mounted an air-sealed plywood box in the ceiling large enough to contain all of the common fan housings. If this seems like too much work I'd still recommend doing as the BC Building Envelope Guide For Houses recommends and mounting a piece of plywood flush with the ceiling framing to provide a larger and more secure surface to seal both the fan housing and drywall to.
You recommend against roof terminations ( I understand that, I think poking holes in your roof is against nature) but also state "In no case should a duct be terminated in an attic or at a soffit.".
Of course, most production builders aren't going to go to the trouble of installing a bath fan the way you suggest. It's worth mentioning that high humidity in the bathroom is really only a problem when it condenses on a surface.
Also, I believe that the amount of air needed to dry out a bathroom is many times more than what's needed to dilute smells. You wrote, "It's worth mentioning that high humidity in the bathroom is really only a problem when it condenses on a surface. An HRV with variable speeds activated by a control panel that monitors humidity and runs on fixed low speed to match required CFM .
Here's my thinking: The roof is completely out of sight (on the rear of the house), while a wall vent would be visible. Arguing about which is better, a roof termination or a wall termination, is a little bit like arguing over which is better, exterior basement insulation or interior basement insulation.
What's wrong with having a "Flue" or "Chimney" that "connects" to the outdoors at a higher altitude rather than lower? In a tight house there are not-so-many openings that "connect" to the outdoors (Ocean of Air).
The size and altitude of the significant openings are what determines the altitude of the Neutral Pressure Plane(NPP). In an unvented roof the danger is that vents that terminate on the soffits can cause rot to the surrounding soffit material - although I've never seen it.
Unfortunately for many homes, multple kids (or entire families in apartments) share the 8x5 bath, while the parents share the mega-volume master bath. Like many house components bath fan installation involves a few subtrades - electrician, duct installer, sider or roofer, interior carpenter (to undercut the door) and there may be others. Is there any efficacy to the use of direct wall mounted fans in situations where the duct would be hard to properly route? It often makes sense to install a wall-mounted fan, especially in a house where ducting a ceiling-mounted fan would be difficult. A wall-mounted exhaust fan should be installed as close to the ceiling as the wall framing allows.
Backdraft dampers that come with bathroom exhaust fans are not airtight, and there are technical reasons why it's difficult to make them airtight, so some air leakage is inevitable. The drape damper excels where mechanical dampers fail, wich is at very low pressure , where it should be sitting most of the time on a bathroom exhaust fan.
I've been wondering about using a double setup as passive inlet for make-up air for quite some time, but i have yet to try it out. So would you say that a wall mounted (through-the-wall) vent fan is not more-inherently inefficient than a ceiling mounted unit? In my case, a wall-mounted fan would be very easy to install, but I'll go through the extra work to install a ceiling-mounted one, ducted, if there is a reasonable efficiency increase. The rumors at the big box improvement store is that the through-the-wall units are"leakier," (though I don't often trust those guys when it comes to efficiency). Adding the cape style damper someone mentioned is interesting, but I'd be installing in a 2x4 wall, so not enough distance for that extra component.
I have never seen any reputable data showing that wall-mounted exhaust fans are leakier or less leaky than ceiling-mounted fans.
I really have no advice for you, other than to say that you should choose the approach that you prefer. We have a bit of a debate going on between a client and the electrician about where to install the bath fan.
As long as the exhaust fan is rated for installation in a shower, and as long as it is on a GFIC circuit, there is no reason not to install it where the customer wants it.
I'm curious about how the Lunos eGo fits into this, as it's exhaust size is only cfm, but is sold as a good fit for the bathroom. Is the 50 cfm code requirement a good number to shoot for (aside from whether it meets code, as in my case there isn't any)? The Lunos eGo is rated at 3 to 12 cfm in heat-recovery mode, and "up to" 27 cfm in exhaust mode.
Clearly, the airflow rate of this fan is insufficient to meet the minimum code requirement for a bathroom exhaust fan unless it is operated continuously in exhaust mode. Whether or not the Lunos eGo exhaust fan will satisfy the homeowner depends entirely on the homeowner's expectations. To be honest I am far more confident installing a gooseneck through the roof , If installed correctly should never have a leakage issue. Martin Holladay has worked as a plumbing wholesale counterperson, roofer, remodeler, and builder. With Instructables you can share what you make with the world, and tap into an ever-growing community of creative experts.
Hey thanks probably use this in a garage or my shed and put it on a cart but great Instructable!!! Hey, just to let you know, I threw this together in a couple hours yesterday afternoon during the heat and oh man! I built two of these and neither of them were able to cool down a bedroom by a single degree. I do love this idea, however I wanted to ask you what the electricity use is on the fan and the pump, and also the creating of the ice? The engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor is a relatively simple sensor that monitors the internal temperature of the engine. The coolant sensor is extremely important because the sensor's input to the PCM affects the operating strategy of the entire engine management system. Many of the fuel, ignition, emissions and drivetrain functions handled by the PCM are affected by the engine's operating temperature. Most coolant sensors are "thermistors" that change resistance as the temperature of the coolant changes. A typical GM coolant sensor, for example, may have around 10,000 ohms resistance at 32 degrees F and drop to under 200 ohms when the engine is hot (200 degrees).
Resistance specifications will vary depending on the application, so any sensor that does not read within its specified range should be replaced. The coolant sensor is typically located near the thermostat housing in the intake manifold. Because of the coolant sensor's central role in triggering so many engine functions, a faulty sensor (or sensor circuit) will often cause cold driveability and emission problems.


Keep in mind that many coolant sensor problems are more often due to wiring faults and loose or corroded connectors than failure of the sensor itself.
The coolant sensor's impact on the engine management system, cold driveability, emissions and fuel economy can also be influenced by the thermostat. A faulty coolant sensor may also cause the engine to overheat if it fails to energize the cooling fan relay when the engine gets hot. A faulty coolant sensor may also cause inaccurate coolant temperature gauge readings on the instrument panel. On 1996 and newer vehicles with OBD II onboard diagnostic systems, a faulty coolant sensor may prevent some of the system monitors from running. On older pre-OBD II vehicles, the Check Engine light may come on if the coolant sensor is shorted, open or is reading out of range.
A visual inspection of the coolant sensor will sometimes reveal a problem such as severe corrosion around the terminal, a crack in the sensor, or coolant leaks around the sensor. On vehicle systems that provide direct access to sensor data with a scan tool, the coolant sensor's output can usually be displayed in degrees Centigrade (C) or Fahrenheit (F). The internal resistance of a coolant sensor can also be checked with an ohmmeter or DVOM (digital volt ohm meter) and compared to specifications.
If the resistance of a coolant sensor is within specifications and changes as engine temperature changes, but the engine is not going into closed loop, the fault is in the wiring or PCM. One trick here is to use a sensor simulator tool to feed a simulated temperature reading through the sensor's wiring harness to the PCM. You can also use a voltmeter or digital storage oscilloscope (DSO) to check the sensor's output. If the voltage drop across the coolant sensor reads at or near 5 volts, it means the sensor is open or it has lost its ground connection. When working on 1985 and up Chrysler products, watch out for a sudden voltage increase as the engine warms up. Sometimes a coolant sensor will suddenly go open or short when it reaches a certain temperature.
If the coolant sensor reads normally when cold (high resistance and 3 or more volts), but never seems to reach normal temperature it could be telling the truth!
It is also a good idea to replace the coolant sensor and thermostat if the engine has experienced a case of severe overheating. This would be a good time to check the condition of the coolant, and to replace it if the coolant is more than three years old (conventional coolant) or five years old (long life coolant). Other compressor units such as those used in SPLIT SYSTEM AIR CONDITIONERS & HEAT PUMPS designs may mount the fan in a vertical position blowing out of the side of the compressor unit rather than out of the compressor top shown in our sketch. If the condenser fan is running you will see the fan blade spinning at speed (typically at 1725 rpm) and you will feel air blowing out of the unit.
Watch out: as we explain at BURNED-OUT COMPRESSOR, if the condensing unit fan is not working the compressor itself may shut down or even be ruined by overpressure or over temperature. Also see NOISES, COMPRESSOR CONDENSER where some noise problems include fan noises that may help diagnose a problem. The air conditioner or heat pump condensing coil (shown at left) receives high pressure refrigerant gas from the compressor and cools this refrigerant gas back to a liquid state. Typically refrigerant leaves the compressor and enters the outdoor condensing coil at about 100 psi and about 95 degF. The Outdoor cooling fan (the subject of this article) moves outdoor air across the condensing coil to cool it and assist in condensing the high pressure, high temperature refrigerant gas back into a liquid. All of the above-listed air conditioner or heat pump components are discussed in detail throughout this website using the links at the left of these pages. Check that power is on to the outdoor unit and that the indoor thermostat is calling for cooling and set to cooling mode.
A condenser fan that won't start when power is turned on, but whose blades will spin easily when power is off may have a worn fan motor shaft bearing.
Also possibly there may be no power to the fan and fan blades are moving due to local breeze blowing through the unit. A slow condenser fan (or air handler unit fan) could be caused by a bad start-run capacitor.
Check for a fan blade hitting an obstruction in the unit; possible failing blower fan motor. If the fan itself is balanced and undamaged and secured to the shaft and the fan motor buzzes or hums the motor may be damaged, overheated, have an internal bearing failure, or the motor may be hard starting.
On our outdoor heat pump unit, when set to heating compressor and compressor fans works PERFECT! We just talked to someone in person that has advanced knowledge of our problem and he said this is a normal built in feature and his unit does the same thing. But it is indeed also normal for the fan on-off cycle to sometimes be different from the compressor motor on-off cycle.
Your service tech will perhaps look for a bad control board, relay, or wiring connection or sensor. A blower fan may run for a brief while after the compressor motor has stopped but if the outdoor fan never stops check for a problem with the control board wiring or circuit.
At REFRIGERANT PRESSURE READINGS we discuss other backwards-running electric motors including some types of air conditioner or heat pump compressors and even well pumps. We list this sequence of condenser fan troubleshooting checkpoints roughly in the order that an experienced service technician will try them, putting easy, cheap, or more likely causes higher in the list. Mechanical stoppage or resistance: Check for a mechanical obstruction (see photo at page top of a stick in the condensing fan) or for a fan bearing that is worn, sticking, freezing. Seizing condenser fan motor or fan parts: Check for bad or loose fan drive shaft or worn, seized fan shaft bearings or for a binding fan motor drive shaft elsewhere in the assembly. A fan (or any electric) motor drive shaft that wobbles side to side (don't try this with power on) is worn out or has worn-out bearings.
Also a fan whose blades are bent or damaged and out of balance can put a wobble on the motor shaft that leads to overheating and binding. Overheating fan motor: Check for a failing or overheating condenser fan motor - if the motor is running hot it may be failing internally (though low voltage, mechanical binding, or excessive current draw in the system can cause overheating too - is the motor stopping due to thermal overload? The dark blue fan shown at right in the sketch is the indoor air handler or blower compartment or cooling coil fan found inside the building. Continue reading at CAPACITORS for HARD STARTING MOTORS or select a topic from the More Reading links or topic ARTICLE INDEX shown below. Our recommended books about building & mechanical systems design, inspection, problem diagnosis, and repair, and about indoor environment and IAQ testing, diagnosis, and cleanup are at the InspectAPedia Bookstore. Complete List of Air Conditioning & Heat Pump Design, Inspection, Repair Books at the InspectAPedia Bookstore.
The Illustrated Home illustrates construction details and building components, a reference for owners & inspectors. Topics range from light bulb replacement to automotive computer replacement and programming. In the old days, if the bathroom was smelly or steamy, you were supposed to open a window to air it out.
Yet this time-honored method of bathroom ventilation is still enshrined in our building codes. For more information on exhaust-only ventilation systems, see Designing a Good Ventilation System. Of course, if the bathroom fan is exhausting 50 cfm, then 50 cfm must be simultaneously entering the building. You don’t really want attic air to be entering the bathroom through this route, so fan installers need to remember to seal the drywall crack around the fan. That’s not necessarily the case; in fact, some bathrooms without exhaust fans stay dry and mold-free for years.
With a little bit of investigation, you should be able to figure out whether the duct in the attic is crushed or whether the termination is filled by a bird’s nest. There’s a problem with this approach, however: once a duct system is installed, a 50 cfm fan might only be moving 25 cfm.
In other words, they didn't realize that the static pressure of a duct system can seriously affect airflow rates. The developer assumed that a 110-cfm fan would be powerful enough to overcome sloppy duct installation and still pass the 50 cfm test.
There are two solutions to this problem: you can swap out the 110 cfm fan for a more powerful model — say, a 200 cfm fan — or you can fix all the duct problems.
For example, ads for Panasonic’s EcoVent fan boast that the fan includes a booster switch that a builder can flip to ramp up the fan’s speed if the fan fails its airflow test.
If you decide to use flex duct instead of smooth-wall duct, the static pressure of your duct system will increase. Fans rated at 139 cfm or less must have a maximum sone rating of 2.0 sones when tested according to the HVI 915 test procedure.
If it’s pointed the wrong way, you’ll have to start out the duct run with two 90° elbows, and that’s a bummer. Joints in galvanized duct should be secured with sheet-metal screws and sealed with HVAC(Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning). A duct that will terminate at a gable wall should first rise to an elbow that is high enough above the fan to allow the installation of a long run of horizontal ductwork that slopes slightly toward the exterior. Roof terminations can work, but you’ll usually encounter fewer problems if you put a hole in your gable wall than if you put a hole in your roof. This type of switch usually includes an override switch allowing the fan to be turned on regardless of the humidity level.
Every family is different, however, so it’s hard to establish rules that apply to everyone.
A central zoned ventilation system with automatic dampers, passive intakes and single ECM motor (actually available). Unless you place tissue over the all of the intake vents, you are only evaluating airflow at the location of the tissue. This puts the damper and connections inside the box allowing easy access for connections, removes all problems of air sealing and also means that the whole fan, including housing, can be changed out without any disruption of the building envelope. I wrote, "In cold climates, bathrooms with poorly insulated surfaces are more at risk than bathrooms with well-insulated surfaces.
The roof is also a shorter duct run with fewer bends, because neither of my fans are very close to a gable wall. Roof terminations are a particularly poor choice in snowy climates, and are much more difficult to install if you have concrete tile roofing than if you have asphalt shingles.
You don't want them to draw the moist air that was just exhausted from the kitchen into the structure. The electrician connects it, like any other appliance, as they are the only trade licensed to do so. The main advantage of a wall-mounted fan is that there is very little static pressure (a major problem with systems that have long, convoluted ducts).
However, the air leakage problems associated with bath exhaust fans exist regardless of where the fan is mounted.
If the bathroom has other cracks, and most do, then you can get away with a smaller undercut. But, are there better-quality exterior dampers that I could replace the stock plastic flapper with?
It would be a good idea to control the fan with a time-delay switch, to make sure that the bathroom air is dry after a shower. And if you have to operate it in exhaust mode, you don't get any benefit from the fan's heat-recovery capabilities -- so why buy a Lunos fan for this purpose? For more information on the wide range of homeowner expectations when it comes to bathroom exhaust fan performance, see Does a Home with an HRV Also Need Bath Fans?
He built his first passive solar house in northern Vermont in 1974, and has lived off the grid since 1975. It RULES for being a quick and cheap alternative to buying a portable AC unit for my apartment. Our land lord is crazy and said rent would cost more with the AC because we have to install it ourselves!
Coolant inside the engine block and cylinder head(s) absorbs heat from the cylinders when the engine is running.


When the PCM receives a cold signal from the coolant sensor, it increases injector pulse width (on time) to create a richer fuel mixture. Spark advance is often limited for emission purposes until the engine reaches normal operating temperature. The PCM will not allow the EGR valve to open until the engine has warmed up to improve driveability. Fuel vapors stored in the charcoal canister are not purged until the engine is warm to prevent driveability problems. The PCM will usually increase idle speed when a cold engine is first started to prevent stalling and improve idle quality.
The PCM may not lockup up the torque converter until the engine has warmed up to improve cold driveability. The PCM will cycle the cooling fan on and off to regulate engine cooling using input from the coolant sensor.
Most are the "NTC" (Negative Temperature Coefficient) type where resistance drops as the temperature goes up.
A Ford coolant sensor, by comparison, may read 95,000 ohms at 32 degrees and drop to 2,300 ohms at 200 degrees. On a few vehicles, the coolant sensor may be located in the cylinder head, or there may be two coolant sensors (one for each cylinder bank in a V6 or V8 engine) or one for the PCM and a second for the cooling fan. A bad coolant sensor can also cause a noticeable increase in fuel consumption, and it may cause a vehicle to fail an emissions test if it prevents the engine management system from going into closed loop. This will prevent the vehicle from passing an OBD II emissions test because the test can't be done unless all the required system monitors have run and passed.
The coolant sensor should read low (or ambient temperature) when the engine is cold, and high (around 200 degrees) when the engine is hot. If the wiring continuity is good but the PCM fails to go into closed loop when you send it a "hot coolant" signal, the problem is in the PCM.
A coolant sensor that is shorted, open or reading out of range obviously can't provide a reliable temperature signal and must be replaced for the engine management system to function properly.
Abnormally high engine temperatures can damage these components and may cause them to misbehave or fail prematurely.
These pressures vary of course by type of refrigerant, ambient temperatures, compressor details, etc. You may detect this by noticing that you can wobble the fan motor shaft (when power is OFF) or you may notice that you can pull the shaft in and out of the motor (loose end-play).
If the compressor won't start and if the unit trips a breaker or blows a fuse as soon as it tries to turn on, the motor is burned out and shorted. An internal short that is grounding the fan motor windings can leave the fan running, but abnormally slowly. If the fan spins on the motor shaft and the motor shaft won't turn the motor may be seized and need replacement.
But when set to cooling the compressor fan stops and starts, it will not stay on when compressor is on.
Check also for a wobbly fan blade (worn or loose fan motor shaft or bearing) or for a fan blade that wobbles and hits the protective screening or for a fan that is jammed by an external occurrence such as a stick falling into the equipment. If the compressor keeps running and the fan re-starts after a 5-15 minute period, and if it's a heat pump running in cold weather, you may be simply seeing a defrost cycle. This fan blows building air across the evaporator coil (or cooling coil) to cool and dehumidify indoor building air.
My AC unit is 18 years old, and I was afraid it was hopeless, but I decided to run through your checklist, and I was able to get it cleaned up and running again. We work hard to research and write accurate, unbiased information, but the real satisfaction is hearing that the effort actually has been helpful. The text is intended as a reference guide to help building owners operate and maintain their home effectively. If some of the makeup air is entering the bathroom through the crack under the bathroom door, an equivalent volume of exterior air must be entering other rooms of the house through a variety of random cracks in the home’s envelope. In many cases, the main factor leading to mold growth is missing insulation above the ceiling.
Instead, you’ll need to measure airflow with a device like the Energy Conservatory’s exhaust fan flow meter. While that solution is easy for the builder, a better solution would be to fix the funky ductwork. Other (more sophisticated) fans — those with electronically commutated motors — have airflow ratings that are roughly equivalent at the different static pressures. These switches can be irritating; they often require seasonal adjustments, since normal indoor humidity levels are often higher during the summer than they are during the winter. But I have a hunch that this article will answer your question: Does a Home with an HRV Also Need Bath Fans?
I have flow tested a fan that passed the tissue test, but the damper was still taped closed from the factory. The only downside is that you have to buy a larger vent cover to use instead of the one that comes with the fan, but in most cases this is a plus as the ones they supply are usually fairly ugly. Martin, I was surprised you so swiftly dismissed roof vents, though not too surprised, given your roofing background. However, it seems like rain might be slightly more likely to find its way into a roof vent, and there is no way to direct condensation out the vent -- it will drip down into the house. The plumbing stacks leak fairly frequently because they usually rely on a neoprene gasket that deteriorates, but roof vents cover themselves with sheet metal in a way that seems to be pretty reliable. 50 CFM (delivered) exhaust is questionable for a small volume, high-use bath unless you have the run-time switch or humidity sensor (FYI: one of these control options and 80 CFM is required by Oregon code. I designed projects with the "chemical" filters (true fart fans) in baths for a national chain. In 1980, Holladay bought his first photovoltaic(PV) Generation of electricity directly from sunlight. I live around Orange-Fullerton,CA area and it does get up to the 100's with around 50-70% humidity in the summer time.
The coolant sensor detects the change in temperature and signals the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) so it can tell if the engine is cold, warming up, at normal operating temperature or overheating. The amount of resistance in the sensor reduces the voltage signal that then returns to the PCM. The sensor may be wired directly to a relay to turn the electric cooling fan on and off, or it may send a signal to a warning light on the instrument panel. No change in the reading or a reading that obviously does not match engine temperature would indicate a faulty sensor or a wiring problem.
But many experts also recommend installing a new coolant sensor if you are replacing or rebuilding an engine.
A bent condenser fan causes stress on the blower fan motor shaft and can destroy the motor. If the fan motor is OK one or more allen screws set into the center bushing of the blower fan itself may need to be tightened to secure the blower fan to the motor shaft. I can hear the coil from the tinny fan control circuit board turning the fan off and then back on during this problem.
Rapid fan on-off cycling certainly is likely to indicate an electrical or control problem worth investigating. The compressor is depending on the fan to move air across the condensing coil to convert high pressure, high temperature gas back to a liquid refrigerant. Tripping circuit breakers can be an immediate indicator of overamping or drawing excessive current.
If spinning the fan manually will get it running, the problem is usually a bad starter capacitor. Finally a senior tech came out and recognized that the fan required a different capacitor than what was initially changed in. In chemistry, vinyl refers to a carbon-and-hydrogen group (H2C=CH–) that attaches to another functional group, such as chlorine (vinyl chloride) or acetate (vinyl acetate).-faced fiberglass duct insulation reduces condensation.
A photovoltaic cell has no moving parts; electrons are energized by sunlight and result in current flow.
So I was wondering how was the condensation on this setup for those who are in much warm climates with high humidity, so that I be prepared to ensure that it does not drip every where on top of monitoring water flow and temperature and possibility of the need to improve the homemade radiator (copper). Consequently, if the coolant sensor fails or is giving the PCM a false reading, it can upset a lot of things. As the engine approaches normal operating temperature, the PCM leans out the fuel mixture to reduce emissions and fuel consumption.
As the engine warms up, the internal resistance of the sensor drops until it reaches a minimum value when the engine is at normal operating temperature.
The PCM then calculates coolant temperature based on the voltage value of the return signal. The green line marks a common location for the fan control circuitry, and the blue line marks the fan motor.
The final solution was for a separate capacitor that matched the fan's requirements to be installed. Special Offer: For a 10% discount on any number of copies of the Home Reference Book purchased as a single order. That’s why ceiling mold often occurs near exterior walls, where insulation tends to be thin. Here’s the trick: these models automatically ramp up the fan in response to duct systems with a high static pressure.
To reduce noise transmission and simplify installation, many installers use a short (generally 2 feet or less) length of flex duct between the fan and the rigid ductwork.
A faulty coolant sensor that always reads cold may cause the fuel control system to run rich, pollute and waste fuel. This number can be displayed on a scan tool, and may also be used by the instrument panel cluster or driver information center to display the temperature reading of the coolant.
On other older applications, a single wire variable resistor temperature sensor that grounds through the threads may be used to send a temperature signal to a gauge on the instrument panel. Because coolant sensors can deteriorate with age and may not read as accurately as they did when they were new. Thanks to Alan Carson and Bob Dunlop, for permission for InspectAPedia to use text excerpts from The Home Reference Book & illustrations from The Illustrated Home. Repairing insulation defects helps prevent mold: the insulation keeps the drywall warm, reducing opportunities for condensation or moisture absorption. At higher static pressure, these fans are more effective than less sophisticated fans, but they also use more power (in watts) to achieve the full airflow they provide. Add the environmental impacts for filter manufacturing and disposal and filtration is laughable as a green option for masking natural bodily functions. A coolant sensor that always reads hot may cause cold driveability problems such as stalling, hesitation and rough idle. Carson Dunlop Associates' provides extensive home inspection education and report writing material. Americans aren't ready to accept the powder room is actually used for something other than powdering your nose; so I suspect that elimation of the fan requirement isn't going to happen. Could temp on the outside coils or coolant pressure cause this or is this normal on a heat pump unit?
Special Offer: For a 5% discount on any number of copies of the Home Reference eBook purchased as a single order. I see ones where 5 feet of flex would suffice , however I see 12 or so feet of flex ducting coiled up like a mess.
Now imagine sending very humid air very slowly through this duct work which is still well below the dew point temperature , it will condense wont it?
So when exhaust fans are used the majority of the make up air enters the home through these intakes, the more frequently the fans are used the better the air quality and really just the general smell of the home tends to be.



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14.09.2014 admin



Comments to «Outside fan not running»

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