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When dogs aren't busy being man's best friend, they're out in the backyard digging up your prize flowerbed with a shifty expression on their face. Snowdog Guru provides helpful advice for larger breeds, like huskies, that are especially prone to digging: troubleshoot.
If you have always been looking for an excuse to build a cutesy picket fence, here it is: Better Homes and Gardens recommends protecting flowerbeds with a low picket fence as a visual and physical barrier for dogs.
This tip seems a touch drastic, but it's endorsed by the Louisiana SPCA: "Blow up some balloons and bury them in the area your dog likes to dig. A makeshift garden moat made with pinecone bedding is clever, crafty and quite uncomfortable for dogs' sensitive paws. Every rose has its thorn, and every dog will think twice about stepping in a flowerbed strewn with thorny rosebush clippings.
Canines do not like things "muy caliente." Discourage your dog from digging in your garden by sprinkling equal parts crushed red pepper and powdered mustard around the perimeter. Whether your dog runs through the garden or digs in the dirt, the resulting damage often leaves the flowers trampled or dead. A barrier to prevent the dog from reaching the garden is often an effective method of protecting flowers. Even with physical barriers such as fences, some dogs are able to find a way into the flower bed. Textures and materials that are unappealing to the dog help deter him from entering the garden.
Some changes to the flower garden and the rest of the yard make the space dog-friendly and reduce damage to the plants.


Your dog could be digging for any number of reasons — to beat the heat, to find pests or due to boredom.
The Dogs Luv Us and We Luv Them blog urges gardeners to embrace the digging and section off a special backyard dig pit where your pooch can dig to his heart's content. A "stink bomb" made from ammonia poured into coffee filters will create an invisible fence around your beautiful begonias. Your dog may be excavating your garden because of a simple need for exercise and stimulation.
For a small dog, building a raised planting bed for your flower garden may discourage the animal from entering the garden. Training your dog when you're in the yard together teaches him to stay away from your flowers. If your dog doesn't dig or otherwise damage the flowers, an option is to create a mulched path through the flower garden. Her experience come from teaching, tutoring and managing educational after school programs. Observe your dog to find out the underlying cause of nonstop digging, and maybe you won't need steps 2-10.
Walk your dog at least twice a day to deplete boundless energy reserves and make flowerbeds less tempting.
Protecting your flower beds often takes one or more control methods, depending on your dog's response and your preferences.
A fence built around the bed itself allows your dog access to most of the yard, but the structure is likely to block the view of the flowers.


This option works best if you are usually in the yard with your dog so you can consistently redirect him when he nears the flower garden. Another option is to fence off a different portion of the yard away from the flower garden just for your dog. Dogs respond differently to training methods, so training with techniques you already use is most effective.
Plants that feel rough, such as rose bushes, around the perimeter of the flower bed slow some dogs down as they near the garden. An invisible fence designed for use with dogs restricts your pet's access to the garden area without any visible barriers that affect the look of the yard.
For example, if your dog responds well to clicker training, use it to teach him to steer clear of your flowers.
Another option is to create a more appealing space in a different part of the yard for your dog. If your dog digs in the garden, cover the soil with materials that discourage digging, such as mulch, decorative rocks or brick pavers.
Choose a shaded area that includes paths they can run along and a dog house or similar structure for shelter. Only incorporate plants in the dog-friendly portion of the yard that you don't mind getting trampled.



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