Cedar Picnic Table Plans,Woodworking Milwaukee,using clay in your woodworking projects - Plans On 2016

To make the project more elegant and keep exposed end-grain to a minimum, I capped the tabletop and bench ends with strips of wood. Take a look at the plans and you’ll see that the slats for the tabletop and bench need tenons on both ends that fit into corresponding mortises in the breadboard ends. When a mortise is going to be close to an end-grain edge, as in the case of the first and last mortises in all the breadboard pieces, you need to leave support in place. To cut the lap joints in the table and bench supports, set your dado blade to take a 5?8"-deep cut, which is half the thickness of the parts you’re working on.
To locate the laps properly, the easiest and fastest way is simply to transcribe directly from the full-size plan onto the pieces themselves. I protected the end-grain of the table legs from moisture damage with 1?4"- thick brass bar stock.
Put the shoes on the legs and your table is ready to be moved to a sunny (or shady) spot in the yard. November 18, 2013 by Spencer and Amanda 10 Comments Towards the end of the summer, I got an idea to build a cedar picnic table in my head and could not get it out!
We built this cedar picnic table as part of a series and you can find how to build and finish each part of the table in separate posts on our blog. But nevertheless it resulted in a beautiful deck table that can comfortably sit up to 16 people. We read on this subject and appears that people recommend staining the red cedar to extend its life – yes, even if it is cedar.
Not to leave on a bitter note, we really enjoy the table despite the stains – very big and gorgeous!


The weak points of most picnic tables are the feet, since the end-grain surfaces draw up moisture. I decided to go with two specific sizes for the project: 1" x 31?2" for the benches and tabletop and 11?4" x 3" for the leg assemblies. I like to use a dado blade in my tablesaw for this job, although you can certainly cut tenons by hand too. A mitre saw is a great tool for the angled cuts on these parts, although a tablesaw works fine too, especially with help from that drafting square. A few of our family and friends have seen the table and each person has said something about how much they love it and how they wish we would build them one!
It is a little more pricey because we went with Cedar because it holds up to the elements and bugs much better than regular ole’ 2×4’s.
We choose to do benches for three reasons: they are easy to build, they are easy to store and you can fit lots of little kids on them!  We made our benches slightly smaller than the table so we can store them underneath when not in use. Regardsignificantly less of the real table’s Common take advantage of, There are considerably more utilizes by which formerly regarded as. If you don’t have a thickness planer, you can use standard 11?2"-thick lumber cut to the right width, but remember to account for this change in dimensions when building the project. Feel free to purchase whatever kind of wood you would like, but I would highly recommend Cedar. I drew full-size end view of the table on a sheet of 1?4" MDF to make sure I had everything right. If you’re using a tablesaw, use a mitre gauge to support the wood as you nibble away at the tenon.


You’ll get best results if you fasten a 30" piece of plywood or hardwood to your tablesaw mitre gauge to stabilize your workpiece and reduce blade tearout along the back of each cut. Use your drafting square to adjust the angle of the gauge and test the results against your full-size plan. You could also drive #10 x 3" screws down through the top of the benchtop and tabletop into the leg assemblies, but pocket screws hide the fasteners. Install the braces with a pair of screws on each end, fastening them into the bench supports, and the underside of the tabletop’s centre slat.
The particular resignificant region is frequently created from light-weight plastic-type, as the lower limbs are manufactured from tubular steel or mightbe steel. I wanted a smooth, relatively knot-free wood for painting, so I chose yellow cedar, but other great options are red or white cedar, hemlock or even an exotic wood such as cypress.
Next, clamp the slats into three assemblies: one with five slats for the table, and two with two slats each for the benches.
But, in any case, the table is still a fine piece of outdoor furniture and you should be proud of your handiwork! Using a chisel and a block plane, adjust the tenons for a perfect fit into the mating mortises.
Draw an “x” in each mortise location to indicate where you will remove wood so you don’t cut in the wrong place.



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