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04.02.2014

Depression and suicidal thoughts statistics, stop ringing in ears natural remedy - For Begninners

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This report was prepared by the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission from SAMHSA. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has been publishing National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) estimates of the prevalence of past year serious mental illness (SMI) and any mental illness (AMI) among adults aged 18 or older since the release of the 2008 NSDUH national findings report. This report presents results pertaining to mental health from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), an annual survey of the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years old or older. NSDUH is the primary source of statistical information on the use of illegal drugs, alcohol, and tobacco by the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States aged 12 years or older.
The 2010 NSDUH employed a State-based design with an independent, multistage area probability sample within each State and the District of Columbia.
Nationally, screening was completed at 147,608 addresses, and 68,487 completed interviews were obtained. From 2004 to 2007, NSDUH collected data for adults aged 18 or older on lifetime and past year MDE. To address SAMHSA's need for estimates of SMI and AMI, as well as data on suicidal ideation and behavior, CBHSQ modified the NSDUH adult mental health items in 2008 to obtain these data. Text, figures, and mental health detailed tables present prevalence measures for the population in terms of both the number of persons and the percentage of the population.
Statistical tests have been conducted for all statements appearing in the text of the report that compare estimates between years or subgroups of the population.
Other reports focusing on specific topics of interest will be produced using the 2010 NSDUH data and made available on SAMHSA's Web site. This chapter presents findings from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) on past year mental illness and mental health problems in the United States, including the percentage of adults aged 18 or older with any mental illness (AMI), serious mental illness (SMI), suicidal thoughts and behavior, and major depressive episode (MDE). Responding to a need for national data on the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and behavior, a set of questions was added beginning with the 2008 NSDUH questionnaire. Adults in 2010 who were unemployed in the past year were more likely than those who were employed full time to have serious thoughts of suicide (6.7 vs.
Compared with adults with private health insurance, adults with Medicaid or CHIP had higher rates of serious thoughts of suicide (6.7 vs. A NSDUH module designed to obtain measures of lifetime and past year prevalence of MDE and treatment for depression has been administered to adults aged 18 or older since 2004. Lifetime MDE is defined as having at least five or more of nine symptoms of depression in the same 2-week period in a person's lifetime, in which at least one of the symptoms was a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities. In 2010, the percentage of adults aged 18 or older receiving treatment for depression in the past year among those with MDE was significantly higher than the percentage in 2009 (68.2 vs.
In 2010, women aged 18 or older who had MDE in the past year were more likely than their male counterparts to have received treatment for depression in the past year (72.9 vs. 2 Other Medical Doctor includes cardiologists, gynecologists, urologists, and other medical doctors who are not general practitioners or family doctors. 3 Other Mental Health Professional includes mental health nurses and other therapists where type is not specified.
This section presents data on the receipt of mental health services among adults aged 18 or older, the perceived unmet need for mental health services among adults, and reasons for not receiving mental health services among adults with an unmet need.
Also described in this section are estimates of the perceived unmet need for mental health services and reasons for not receiving mental health services among adults aged 18 or older.
Among the 5.2 million adults aged 18 or older who reported an unmet need for mental health care and did not receive mental health services in the past year, several reasons were reported for not receiving mental health care.
This chapter presents findings from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) on past year major depressive episode (MDE), MDE accompanied by severe impairment in one or more role domains, and the percentage receiving treatment for depression among youths aged 12 to 17 in the United States. A module of questions designed to obtain measures of lifetime and past year prevalence of MDE, severe impairment caused by MDE in the past year, and treatment for MDE in the past year has been administered to youths aged 12 to 17 since 2004. Note: Respondents with an unknown level of impairment were included in the estimates for Major Depressive Episode without Severe Impairment. In 2000, NSDUH initiated mental health service utilization modules for respondents aged 12 to 17 and those aged 18 or older. Youths in 2010 who received inpatient specialty mental health services in the past year were more likely than those who received outpatient specialty mental health services to report receiving services due to having thought about or attempted suicide (40.5 vs. This chapter presents findings from the 2010 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) on the co-occurrence of mental illness and mental health problems with substance use and substance use disorders (illicit drug or alcohol dependence or abuse) in the United States. People who use prescription opiates other than as ordered by a doctor are more likely to consider suicide than those who use these medications only appropriately or not at all.
The severity of use was a strong determinant of suicidal ideation: 23 percent of respondents who self-reported symptoms consistent with a diagnosis of prescription opiate use disorder within 1 year before the survey had considered self-destruction.


Altogether 18 percent of current users of nonprescribed opiates who reported thinking about suicide said that they had attempted to kill themselves, compared to 11 percent of never-users and 7 percent of former users who considered suicide. The Kristin Brooks Hope Center was created to help those in crisis find help and hope immediately. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and by RTI International (a trade name of Research Triangle Institute), Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. This report presents national estimates of the prevalence of past year mental disorders and past year mental health service utilization for youths aged 12 to 17 and adults aged 18 or older.
The survey excludes homeless persons who do not use shelters, military personnel on active duty, and residents of institutional group quarters, such as jails and hospitals. A final chapter describes key findings in relation to other data sources and methodological work, supported by the expansion of the MHSS, for refining the mental health estimates. Unless explicitly stated that a difference is not statistically significant, all statements that describe differences are significant at the .05 level.
In addition, this chapter includes estimates of the percentages of adults who received treatment for mental health problems in the past year overall and among those with AMI, SMI, and MDE. 102-321, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) Reorganization Act of 1992, established a block grant for States within the United States to fund community mental health services for adults with SMI.
These questions ask all adult respondents if at any time during the past 12 months they had serious thoughts of suicide, and among those with suicidal ideation, whether they made suicide plans or attempts in the past year. Some questions in the adult depression module differ slightly from questions in the adolescent depression module. These include AMI and three levels of mental illness among those with AMI: low (mild) mental illness, moderate mental illness, and SMI.
Although less likely than for adults with SMI, a similar pattern of mental health service use by age group was evident among adults with moderate mental illness and low (mild) mental illness.
This chapter also presents findings on mental health service utilization by youths for any emotional and behavioral problems (excluding those caused by alcohol or illicit drug use).
As described in the next paragraph, some questions in the adolescent depression module differ slightly from questions in the adult depression module to make them more appropriate for youths. It should be noted that unlike the DSM-IV criteria for MDE, no exclusions were made in NSDUH for depressive symptoms caused by medical illness, bereavement, or substance use disorders.
These modules ask about services for emotional and behavioral problems that were not caused by substance use.
Youths also are asked about the number of nights spent in overnight facilities, the number of visits they had to outpatient mental health providers, and the reason(s) for the most recent stay or visit. Levels of any mental illness (AMI) considered in this report include serious mental illness (SMI), moderate mental illness, and low (mild) mental illness, which are differentiated by their level of functional impairment. This pattern was similar for most specific types of illicit drug use, including the use of marijuana, cocaine, hallucinogens, inhalants, or heroin and the nonmedical use of prescription-type psychotherapeutics.
A recent NIDA-supported study also disclosed that the risk for suicidal thoughts remains elevated after cessation of use. Janet Kuramoto and colleagues at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, found that 15 percent of 37,933 adult respondents to the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported having used a nonprescribed opiate at least once in their life. Major depressive episodes, which may increase vulnerability to nonprescribed opiate use, also increased the risk for having suicidal thoughts.
Persistent use of nonprescription opioids increased the risk of moving from suicidal thoughts to attempted suicide, but this association was no longer significant after adjustment for demographic factors. Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempt Across Stages of Nonmedical Prescription Opioid Use and Presence of Prescription Opioid Disorders Among U.S. The site and her story gives you a raw, personal glimpse into depression, and how it affects those around you. Although women are more likely to become depressed, men are susceptible to feelings of hopelessness and suicidal thoughts.
Among adults, estimates presented include rates and numbers of persons with any mental illness (AMI), serious mental illness (SMI), suicidal thoughts and behavior, major depressive episode (MDE), treatment for depression (among adults with MDE), and mental health service utilization.
Estimates of MDE and mental health service utilization among youths in 2010 are presented in Chapters 3 and 4 of this report. If an attempt was made, additional items asked whether the respondent received medical attention or hospitalization as a result of attempted suicide. It should be noted that, unlike the DSM-IV criteria for MDE, no exclusions were made in NSDUH for depressive symptoms caused by medical illness, bereavement, or substance use disorders. Also, the utilization of substance use and mental health services among adults with co-occurring mental illness and substance use is discussed. The researchers suggest that both present and former users of nonprescribed opiates be monitored accordingly.


Among current users at the time of the survey, 11 percent who had use histories greater than 2 years (persistent), and 9 percent of those with use histories of less than 1 year (recent-onset), had thought of suicide during the past 12 months. The number of individuals who converted suicidal thoughts into suicide attempts ranged from 7 to 19 percent, with no significant differences between groups. This revised model incorporates the NSDUH respondent's age and indicators of past year suicide thoughts and depression, along with the variables that were specified in the 2008 model (Kessler-6 [K6] questions on psychological distress and an abbreviated set of questions on impairment in carrying out activities from the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule [WHODAS]), leading to more accurate estimates of SMI and AMI. Estimates presented in this report for youths include MDE, treatment for depression (among youths with MDE), and mental health service utilization. The survey is sponsored by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. ACASI is designed to provide the respondent with a highly private and confidential mode for responding to questions in order to increase the level of honest reporting of illicit drug use and about other sensitive topics, including mental health issues.
For the remaining 42 States and the District of Columbia, the sample size was about 900 per State. In addition, a Mental Health Surveillance Study (MHSS) was initiated in which a subsample of adults (about 1,500 in 2008 and 500 each in 2009 and 2010) who had completed the NSDUH interview was administered a standard clinical interview by mental health clinicians via paper and pencil over the telephone to determine their mental illness status. When a set of estimates for survey years or population subgroups is presented without a statement of comparison, statistically significant differences among these estimates are not implied and testing may not have been conducted. Treatment for MDE in adults is defined as seeing or talking to a medical doctor or other professional or using prescription medication for depression in the past year. Findings for youths aged 12 to 17 are presented on the co-occurrence of MDE with substance use and substance use disorders. Among former users who had not taken a nonprescribed opiate within the past year, 7 percent experienced suicidal ideation.
The researchers surmise that several factors that were unmeasured in the study might contribute to the remaining risk, including chronic pain (which is thought to have an elevated prevalence among users of nonprescribed opiates) and nonprescribed opiate use itself.
Symptoms, causes and treatment for depression and suicide also differ between men and women men than for women. Estimates and estimation procedures described in this report for those measures are based on the 2008 model and not the 2012 revised model.
Measures related to the co-occurrence of mental disorders with substance use or with substance use disorders also are presented for both adults and youths. Department of Health and Human Services, and is planned and managed by SAMHSA's Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality (CBHSQ, formerly the Office of Applied Studies, OAS). Using both clinical interview and computer-assisted interview data for the respondents who completed the clinical interview, statistical models were developed that then were applied to data from adult respondents who had not completed the clinical interviews to produce estimates of mental illness among the adult civilian, noninstitutionalized population. SAMHSA defined SMI as persons aged 18 or older who currently or at any time in the past year have had a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder (excluding developmental and substance use disorders) of sufficient duration to meet diagnostic criteria specified within DSM-IV (APA, 1994) that has resulted in serious functional impairment, which substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities.
Treatment for MDE among youths is defined as seeing or talking to a medical doctor or other professional or using prescription medication for depression in the past year.
Among both female and male youths, the percentages of past year MDE and MDE with severe impairment were similar in 2009 and 2010. There were no statistically significant gender differences in the use of inpatient specialty mental health services. In contrast, only 3 percent of individuals who never used a nonprescribed opiate had considered suicide (see figure). Kristin experienced this misery, yet still managed to touch many lives and even in death continues to help others find help for their depression. In order for men who are affected by depression to receive the help, it's important for them and their loved ones to be aware of the warning signs.
The report focuses mainly on trends between 2009 and 2010 and differences across population subgroups in 2010. The definitions for these measures in the glossary accompanying the mental health detailed tables for 2010 and 2011 also are based on the 2012 revised model.
Estimates from the expanded adult mental health questions for 2009 and 2010 (including those for AMI, SMI, and suicidal thoughts, plans, and attempts) are included in Chapters 2 and 4 of this report. Other mental health measures in this report, such as major depressive episode (MDE) and serious thoughts of suicide, were not affected.



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