One study found that people who lost weight using a high-carbohydrate diet were breaking down about 35% lean tissue and 65% fat. Another way protein impacts weight loss is via thermogenesis, or the amount of energy needed to digest, absorb, and metabolize the nutrients you eat. But the most dramatic way in which protein affects metabolism and energy expenditure is through its role in muscle building and maintenance. The exact amount of protein should be determined according to your body weight (or better yet, your lean body weight as estimated through a body composition analysis). Eating enough protein becomes even more important during aging, because your ability to use protein efficiently gradually decreases after you turn 40. We believe that after four consecutive week at GreenLite, you will feel more empowered and in control of your weight.
Because protein has a higher rate of thermogenesis than both carbohydrates or fat, your body uses up more calories trying to digest protein than other foods.


There is evidence that you need a minimum amount of protein at a meal in order to preserve your lean body mass during weight loss and to achieve a more desirable body composition. You might be surprised to hear that a 65-year-old is likely to need more protein than a 16-year-old.
Studies show that most of us tend to eat almost all of our protein in a single meal: dinner. Protein is also important for avoiding that dreaded late afternoon slump – so keep a protein-rich stash of snacks at your work desk to keep you from reaching for a quick pick-me-up through sugar or caffeine. Dietary protein and exercise have additive effects on body composition during weight loss in adult women. And even when weight loss results are similar, fat loss tends to be higher on low-carb, high-protein diets.
Though you may require fewer calories as you age, you need more high-quality, nutrient-dense protein (along with exercise and resistance training) to prevent muscle wasting.


Examples of good sources are: whey protein powder, chicken and turkey breast (white meat only, no skin), egg whites, nonfat cheese, nonfat Greek-style yogurt, white tuna (canned in water), fish (such as cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, tilapia, and shellfish,) and very lean selections of turkey bacon, Canadian bacon and luncheon meats. For most people, breakfast is usually the meal of the day you get the least protein, so make sure to start your day with a positive protein balance. Since positive protein balance only lasts about three hours after ingestion, it’s important to eat enough protein throughout the day.



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