Although a great number of people try meditation at some point in their lives, a small percentage actually stick with it for the long-term.
Meditation is an absolutely wonderful practice, but can be very difficult in the beginning. Active Meditation is where your body and mind sync up- like going for a long walk (Darwin was a fan of walking meditation) and focusing on your body’s movement, the pavement under your feet, etc. There is tons of guides to meditation, different types of meditation and more on the health benefits of meditating all over the internet and on Pinterest!
This is unfortunate, and a possible reason is that many beginners do not begin with a mindset needed to make the practice sustainable. You will only get to the next level in meditation by setting aside specific time (preferably two times a day) to be still. Breathing deep slows the heart rate, relaxes the muscles, focuses the mind and is an ideal way to begin practice.
This is very common for beginners as we think “hey, what am I doing here” or “why can’t I just quiet my damn mind already”. Although many of us think of effective meditation as a Yogi sitting cross-legged beneath a Bonzi tree, beginners should be more experimental and try different types of meditation. A great practice for beginning meditators is to take notice of the body when a meditative state starts to take hold. Preferably an instructional guide AND one that describes the benefits of deep meditative states. Meditation is a life-long practice, and you will benefit most by NOT examining the results of your daily practice.


Finding your breath and “being present” while not in formal practice is a wonderful way to evolve your meditation habits. For beginning meditators, the slightest physical movements can transform a meditative practice from one of frustration to one of renewal. Meditating with a partner or loved one can have many wonderful benefits, and can improve your practice. Without a doubt, early morning is an ideal time to practice: it is quieter, your mind is not filled with the usual clutter, and there is less chance you will be disturbed. Once your practice is through, spend 2-3 minutes feeling appreciative of the opportunity to practice and your mind’s ability to focus. Meditation is hard work, and you will inevitably come to a point where it seemingly does not fit into the picture anymore.
To this end, it is recommended that you schedule in your meditation session, first thing in the morning, for example, and let it become a part of your natural routine.
Many people are intimidated by meditation and are more drawn to the physical yoga practice.
Maybe you just sit for 5 minutes a day for a week the first time, and then build on that until you have a regular, consistent practice.
I personally have never managed to do much with it but I plan on beginning a meditation practice this week. Quiet your mind and sit still for 15-20 minutes, focusing on one thing like your breath, a sound, a word. Once the mind quiets, put all your attention to the feet and then slowly move your way up the body (include your internal organs).


If you have it in the back of your mind that the phone might ring, your kids might wake, or your coffee pot might whistle than you will not be able to attain a state of deep relaxation.
These adjustments may be barely noticeable to an observer, but they can mean everything for your practice. Having a daily routine where you make some time to meditate is important in establishing it going forward.
Usually when I sit, I allow my mind to wander and I end up daydreaming rather than meditating. Here someone will guide you through a basic meditation, all you need to do is sit up and focus. Chances are that losing the ability to focus on meditation is parallel with your inability to focus in other areas of your life!
First thing in the morning or right before bed are two excellent times of day for your practice. Meditating for as little as 8-10 minutes a day can have a profoundly beneficial impact on your overall sense of wellbeing! Among many other things, meditation has been known to dramatically reduce stress and anxiety which are so prevalent in our modern lifestyles.



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