Although a great number of people try meditation at some point in their lives, a small percentage actually stick with it for the long-term. Meditation is an absolutely wonderful practice, but can be very difficult in the beginning. The practice comes with a myriad of well-publicized health benefits including increased concentration, decreased anxiety, and a general feeling of happiness.
This is unfortunate, and a possible reason is that many beginners do not begin with a mindset needed to make the practice sustainable. You will only get to the next level in meditation by setting aside specific time (preferably two times a day) to be still. Breathing deep slows the heart rate, relaxes the muscles, focuses the mind and is an ideal way to begin practice.
Although many of us think of effective meditation as a Yogi sitting cross-legged beneath a Bonzi tree, beginners should be more experimental and try different types of meditation. A great practice for beginning meditators is to take notice of the body when a meditative state starts to take hold.


Preferably an instructional guide AND one that describes the benefits of deep meditative states. Meditation is a life-long practice, and you will benefit most by NOT examining the results of your daily practice. For beginning meditators, the slightest physical movements can transform a meditative practice from one of frustration to one of renewal.
Meditating with a partner or loved one can have many wonderful benefits, and can improve your practice.
Without a doubt, early morning is an ideal time to practice: it is quieter, your mind is not filled with the usual clutter, and there is less chance you will be disturbed. Meditation is hard work, and you will inevitably come to a point where it seemingly does not fit into the picture anymore. If you resonate with what you see here, you can follow us by clicking any of the social icons below. The art of focusing your attention to a single point is hard work, and you have to be purposefully engaged!


Once the mind quiets, put all your attention to the feet and then slowly move your way up the body (include your internal organs). If you have it in the back of your mind that the phone might ring, your kids might wake, or your coffee pot might whistle than you will not be able to attain a state of deep relaxation.
These adjustments may be barely noticeable to an observer, but they can mean everything for your practice.
Chances are that losing the ability to focus on meditation is parallel with your inability to focus in other areas of your life!




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