As much as we all like to operate from the Peter Pan part of ourselves, getting older has its drawbacks. Checkout this latest Kurzweil post on a recent UCLA study showing that meditation not only helps with brain connectivity, but that the alternative practice can also prevent (or delay) age-related brain atrophy.
If you've been around meditation for a while you know that it's helpful with a lot of things. If you pay attention to yourself and those around you, more often than not you will find that most of us suffer from a closed heart.
If you're anything like me, on a daily basis you come into contact with people and situations that, well cause you to become frustrated.
Although the word charka is foreign to most people, put simply, it represents an energy vortex found in the body that helps to regulate mental, physical, and spiritual health.
The reasons for meditation are as diverse as those who practice this ancient healing technique.


When it comes to stress and anxiety, most know that unless addressed through practices like meditation, these two silent killers can ultimately lead to physical and emotional distress. With regard to health and well being, truth be told, I haven't yet found anything closely resembling the magic pill.
I don't know about you, but when I was a kid you could go out and play and no one could find you until you were good and ready to come home. Of all the meditation techniques practiced, one of the more challenging is Vipassana meditation. Sure you have a whole lot more understanding of how the world works and your place in it, and without question, you can serve as an example to the younger generation who is still trying to find their way. According to the study, meditation benefits the entire brain creating stronger connections that help to influence how the brain relays electrical signals. They found that the differences between meditators and controls are not confined to a particular core region of the brain but involve large-scale networks that include the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes and the anterior corpus callosum, as well as limbic structures and the brain stem.


The greatest differences between the two groups were seen within the corticospinal tract (a collection of axons that travel between the cerebral cortex of the brain and the spinal cord), the superior longitudinal fasciculus (long bi-directional bundles of neurons connecting the front and the back of the cerebrum), and the uncinate fasciculus (white matter that connects parts of the limbic system, such as the hippocampus and amygdala, with the frontal cortex). For most, the practice involves grabbing a cushion, plopping oneself down with eyes closed, and turning one's focus within.
Emotional challenges, physical problems, and spiritual maladies are just some of the things that meditation can help provide both relief and insight into. Unfortunately, this view on how to cultivate peace and happiness is focused in the wrong direction.
Some use it to relieve stress and anxiety, while others use the practice to tap into their creative center.



Meditation vacation thailand
How to be more energetic naturally
Career change advice uk