These sections are largely identical with passages in Pliny’s geographical books (Books III to VI), and show that many passages in Pliny are taken from Agrippa beyond those where he is actually named. Schnabel here refers to the last chapter of the geographical books of Pliny’s Natural History, that is, Book VI, cap. From another well-known passage in Strabo (V, 3, 8, C, 235-236) that contains a panegyric [a public speech or published text in praise of someone or something] on the fine buildings of Augustan Rome, we know that he was well acquainted with the dedications of Marcus Agrippa that he specifically mentions. When medieval Christians began creating the mappaemundi they borrowed heavily from Agrippa’s map as well as Greek designs. The general history of ancient cartography and our knowledge of Roman buildings in the Augustan period would appear to be our surest guides.
39, section 211, refers obviously to all that follows as far as the end of Book VI and shows that the complete passage is taken from Greek sources.
Fisher believes that the central zones on Agrippa’s map had to be eliminated when the Christians decided to adopt and adapt from Greek maps the concept of cartographic centricity by distorting the map to position the holy city of Jerusalem at the map’s center.
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This method Ptolemy has described quite clearly and unambiguously in the fourth chapter of Book I of his Geography. He was, therefore, well acquainted also with the map or Agrippa to which, or to whose content he refers no less than seven times in his Books II, V and VI.


The mappaemundi maintained this orientation because medieval Christians held Eden, which they believed resided in the east, in high esteem. His chief pride would seem to have been in his measurements, and indeed it is only for the exactness of these that Pliny praises him when he refers to B?tica in Book III, 17. The date at which the building was started is not known, but it was still incomplete in 7 B.C. But whether it was only intended to be imagined by readers or was actually illustrated in the book is not clear. It appears from passages in Pliny that Varro had already used the Roman itineraries in his geographical books and Agrippa was only following his example. The same applies to possible cartographic illustration of Varro’s Antiquitates rerum humanarum et divinarum, of which Books VII-XIII dealt with Italy.
But at least we know that he was keen on illustration, since his Hebdomades vel de imaginibus, a biographical work in fifteen books, was illustrated with as many as seven hundred portraits. The two main passages from Strabo’s second book may reasonably be regarded as a transcript of contemporary geographical practice and since between them they give an exact description of the methods followed in the ancient remains of the map of Agrippa, Tierney thinks that they may rightly be regarded as a strong proof that the views held on this map by Detlefsen and Klotz are generally correct. For it was Augustus who, when Agrippa’s sister had begun building the portico, carried through the scheme from the intention and notes [commentarii] of M.
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We look forward to hearing from you and to welcoming your partnership in the building of this long overdue and much needed monument.It is time!Most sincerely,C. The Cotton Pickers of America Monument, Sharecroppers Interpretive Center, and Cotton Kingdom Trail make the case for building a National Park that offers a small token of appreciation for their tireless uncompensated work. Winter Building Wednesday, June 18: Former Secretary of State Dick Molpus talks about his experience during the Philadelphia civil rights murders of 1964. Wednesday, September 25: Author Robert Blade will talk about his book, "Tupelo Man," a biography of George McLean. I look forward to being a significant force in this community, by helping the White community too recognize the benefits of building relationships that they can trust in leadership positions. We invite all community-based experts in any field to become a part of the challenge to address issues of: unemployment, entrepreneurship, illiteracy, poor self-esteem, teen pregnancy, obesity, hopelessness, communication skills, journalism and creative writing, etc.



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