29.04.2016

Chinese tcm serangoon

Traditional Chinese Medicine is a 3000-year-old medical system that has developed and evolved over the centuries in China. Acupuncture – the medical use of fine needles inserted into the skin at points along the meridian system for healing. Tui Na Therapy – a sophisticated form of body work using deep muscle massage, joint movement, stretching and meridian work.
Food Cure – the art and tradition of food combining and careful diet as a medicinal treatment.
Qi-Gong – A discipline of movement, breath and mental exercise that is considered by some to be a martial art, by others, a medical or meditative system.
Tai-Ji – or Taijiquan covers many styles of martial arts forms, each developed for different outcomes.
The principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine are deeply rooted in Ancient Chinese Philosophy.
Something I find interesting about the history of Chinese Medicine is how systems of knowledge have developed over the centuries in Chinese civilization. Traditional healing knowledge and techniques were always developed and passed down from teacher to students, usually along family lines. So it is no surprise many Chinese doctors over the centuries have performed research on themselves using master Shennong’s model. The vast majority of Oriental medicine practitioners active today are graduates of modern TCM colleges, and the few remaining classically-trained practitioners tend to pass on their art one on one through the master-apprentice relationship over many years, not in three or four year University seminars.
TCM from its inception was a political creation.  A full academic discussion of this process is beyond the scope of this article, but those interested in a more scholarly treatment are heartily encouraged to peruse Professor Heiner Freuhauf’s outstanding essay here. It is important to keep in mind that the initial plan, as espoused by representatives of both the Nationalist government of Sun Yatsen (himself a doctor of Western medicine) and subsequently by the Mao Zedong’s Communist government, was to abolish the classical medicine altogether. Notwithstanding a few flip-flops on the issue by Chairman Mao, such as when he contrived the idea encourage traditional forms of healthcare amongst the general populace in order to lessen the country’s dependence on Western medical supplies and equipment from the Soviet Union, or the famous occasion when he became ill himself and called for two classically trained Chinese doctors, it was during his “Cultural Revolution” that the practice of classical Chinese medicine reached perhaps the lowest point in its two millennia history.
The result was the highly modified and often internally inconsistent system upon which was bestowed the name “traditional Chinese medicine” or “TCM”, a system in which classical therapies are often prescribed not in response to classically-recognized patterns of disharmony, but in response to the diagnosis of conventional medical pathologies.  Much of the theoretical framework within which the classical medicine had been practiced for thousands of years was replaced with formulaic “cookbook” lists of prescriptions – for appendicitis take this herb, for high blood pressure stick needles here, etc.
In just over a month, on March 9th, the 2012, 2-year Graduate Mentorship Program will begin.


With this in mind, the Graduate Mentorship Program offers both the three-day weekends (8 of them altogether) and then, in addition, offers the weekend repeated bit by bit, in weekly assignments. Another important aspect of the Graduate Mentorship Program is the community that gets created among us all in relation to the medicine. When our diagnosis is clear and well articulated, determining the correct treatment follows rather seamlessly. It is for this reason that, during the first weekends of the Graduate Mentorship Program, the focus is on diagnostic skills. Good diagnostic skills can only develop when the practitioner has a deep and dynamic understanding of physiology. Because my own experience, both studying in China and in my own practice has had an emphasis on women’s health, this emphasis is reflected in the Graduate Mentorship Program.
Throughout, we develop our ability to understand diseases through the lens of our good diagnosis rather than trying to match our patient to a formula or disease factor in a book. If you would like to read what others have said about the program, we have a testimonial page. Welcome to the Topics in Chinese Medicine BlogThis blog is dedicated to the exploration of a variety of topics within the field of Chinese medicine. It holds that the universe is in constant dynamic balance, the energies, forces and qualities within us and in the universe around us, are always seeking balance. Jiang Feng spent primarily in traveling outside of mainland China treating foreign patients. These assignments involve watching about a 1 hour video presentation that has been edited from footage of the class – with questions in mind to think about for the week. We bring our diagnostic skills into the treatment of women through menarche, fertility, pregnancy, postpartum and menopause. It is a form of Oriental medicine, which includes other traditional East Asian medical systems such as Japanese and Korean medicine. All forms of Tai-Ji are complete body exercise systems deeply rooted in traditional Chinese philosophy and practice. Traditional Chinese Medicine uses the four approaches I listed above in combination to restore balance.


One of the important contributions he is credited with was the knowledge and use of medicinal herbs. As you know may know from my Bio, my father had a Traditional Chinese Medical practice for many years. However, once our diagnostic skills are grounded, our ability to understand and work flexibly and accurately with formulas increases by leaps and bounds.
TCM says processes of the human body are interrelated and constantly interact with the environment. The legend goes that he spent many years testing thousands of different herbal combinations and studied the effects on himself.
In fact, it is impossible to really understand herb and formulas without the ability to deeply diagnose. Therefore the theory looks for the signs of disharmony in the external and internal environment of a person in order to understand, treat and prevent illness and disease. Many of these students are taking the course from their homes in places like California, Vancouver or Texas. The course is also live-streamed AND it is filmed and broken down into weekly shorts.
TCM theory is based on a number of philosophical frameworks including the Theory of Yin-yang, the Five Elements, the human body Meridian system, Zang Fu theory, and others.
TCM does not usually operate within a scientific paradigm but some practitioners make efforts to bring practices into an evidence-based medicine framework.
The resource are for the Graduate Mentorship Program is just this kind of cyber-teahouse dedicated to the participants of the program.
In this program we revisit touching diagnosis with a strong abdominal and pulse diagnosis component. For this reason, this course teaches classic physiology, taking that which students have learned in school and seeing it in a dynamic and integrated frame of reference.



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Comments to «Chinese tcm serangoon»

  1. emo_girl writes:
    Program was undertaken after a 2010 UnitedHealthcare pilot.
  2. Dont_Danger writes:
    For sure situations, comparable make sure that your practitioner has.