05.06.2015

Chinese medicine liver invading spleen x ray

Chinese herbology often incorporates ingredients from all parts of plants, including the roots, leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits, and also ingredients from animals and minerals. The Compendium of Materia Medica (Ben Cao Gangmu) compiled during the Ming dynasty by Li Shizhen (1518 – 1593), is still used today for consultation and reference.
During the Neo-Confucian Song-Jin-Yuan era (tenth to twelfth centuries), the theoretical framework of acupuncture theory, which was rooted in Han Confucian theory, was formally applied to herbal categorization, which had previously been the domain of Daoist natural science. The Four Natures theory pertains to the degree of yin and yang, cold (extreme yin), cool, neutral, warm and hot (extreme yang). The "five tastes" are pungent, sweet, sour, bitter and salty, each of which has its functions and characteristics. The Meridians refer to currents of energy which flow through different organs and parts of the body. Acupuncture & Integrative Medicine College, Berkeley Acupuncture School (Berkeley, CA). New World Encyclopedia writers and editors rewrote and completed the Wikipedia article in accordance with New World Encyclopedia standards. Note: Some restrictions may apply to use of individual images which are separately licensed.
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The use of parts of endangered species (such as seahorses, rhinoceros horns, and tiger bones) has created controversy and resulted in a black market of poachers who hunt restricted animals. Appropriately, his name means "the Divine Farmer." Considered the father of Chinese agriculture, this legendary emperor taught his people how to cultivate grains as food, so as to avoid killing animals. It lists various medical herbs, such as reishi, which were discovered by Shennong and given grade and rarity ratings.
These works are still referenced today for medical diagnosis, treatment, and the differentiation of yin-yang and the six stages. In particular, the theories of the Five Phases (Tastes) and the Twelve Channels (Energy Meridians) came to be used after this period.


The patient's internal balance of yin and yang is taken into account when the herbs are selected.
For example, pungent herbs are used to generate sweat and to direct and vitalize qi and the blood.
Certain herbs are linked with specific meridians and therefore act upon the organs associated with them. Several herbs and other ingredients are dried and ground, then mixed into a powder and formed into pills. This article abides by terms of the Creative Commons CC-by-sa 3.0 License (CC-by-sa), which may be used and disseminated with proper attribution. During the Neo-Confucian Song-Jin-Yuan era (tenth to twelfth centuries), the theories of the Five Phases (Tastes) and the Twelve Channels (Meridians) were applied to herbology.
Each herbal medicine prescription is a cocktail of many herbs tailored to the individual patient and based on traditional Chinese medical theory. For example, medicinal herbs of "hot," yang nature are used when the person is suffering from internal cold that requires to be purged, or when the patient has a general cold constituency.
Credit is due under the terms of this license that can reference both the New World Encyclopedia contributors and the selfless volunteer contributors of the Wikimedia Foundation. Unlike in the production of Western medications, the balance and interaction of all the ingredients in a Chinese herbal prescription is considered more important than the effects of the individual ingredients.
The first Chinese manual on pharmacology, the Shennong Bencao Jing (Shennong Emperor's Classic of Materia Medica), lists some 365 medicines of which 252 are herbs, and dates from the first century C.E. Some sweet-tasting herbs also exhibit a bland taste, which helps drain dampness through diuresis. All Chinese patent medicines of the same name will have the same proportions of ingredients. Chinese herbology incorporates ingredients from all parts of plants, including the roots, leaves, stems, flowers, and fruits, and also ingredients from animals and minerals.
Shennong is credited with identifying hundreds of medical (and poisonous) herbs by personally testing their properties.


There are about 11,096 prescriptions to treat common illness, 8,160 of which were compounded or collected by Li. Chinese patent medicines are easy and convenient, but are not easy to customize for a particular patient. Sometimes, ingredients are needed to cancel out toxicity or side-effects of the main ingredients. He is also said to have discovered tea, which acts as an antidote against the poisonous effects of some seventy herbs. Succeeding generations added to this work with new treatises, such as the seventh-century Tang dynasty Yaoxing Lun (???; also spelled Yao Xing Lun, "Treatise on the Nature of Medicinal Herbs").
For every herb there are entries on names, detailed description of appearance and odor, nature, medical function, effects and prescriptions. Sour taste most often is astringent and consolidates qi and secretions, while bitter herbs drain qi downward, dispel heat, purge the bowels and get rid of dampness by drying them out. They are best used when a patient's condition is not severe and the medicine can be taken as a long-term treatment. Some herbs require the use of other ingredients as catalysts, without which the brew is ineffective. Unlike in the production of western medications, the balance and interaction of all the ingredients in a Chinese herbal prescription is considered more important than the effects of the individual ingredients. A crucial element in traditional Chinese medicine is the treatment of each patient as an individual.



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Comments to «Chinese medicine liver invading spleen x ray»

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