02.08.2014

Cancer treatment centers of america employee benefits

At CTCA, you will be cared for by a team of experienced oncologists and other cancer experts. CTCA at Southwestern Regional Medical Center houses some of the most advanced diagnostic and therapeutic resources in cancer treatment, available to patients seven days a week.
At CTCA at Midwestern Regional Medical Center, cancer experts work together in one location, sharing their knowledge, coordinating treatments and, ultimately, providing comprehensive cancer treatment tailored to you.
CTCA at Western Regional Medical Center is one of our newest, state-of-the-art cancer hospitals.
This is the love story of Samantha and Kyle; how they met, fell in love and then unexpectedly found out that their path to happy-ever-after was not going to be an easy one. Like many other people today who are in search of finding the perfect life partner, Samantha and Kyle met online at a Christian dating site in 2013.
Because she was so young (28) and there was no history of breast cancer in her immediate family Samantha didn't panic.
When Samantha saw the box on the table Kyle told her it was a box for their notes to each other.
When you are told you have prostate cancer and begin looking for treatment options, you may be concerned about life expectancy and quality of life. The chart below shows the cancer survival rates of 95 metastatic prostate cancer patients who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Of the CTCA metastatic prostate cancer patients shown in the above chart, the estimated survival rate at six months was 95%. SEER is the only authoritative source of population-based information about cancer incidence and survival in the United States that includes the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis and patient survival data. The objective of this analysis was to see how long each group of patients survived after their diagnosis. The independent biostatistician computed the survival outcomes of metastatic prostate cancer patients from the CTCA database and metastatic prostate cancer patients from the SEER database who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2009.
The chart below shows the cancer survival rates for a group of 156 metastatic prostate cancer patients who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2011. Of the CTCA metastatic prostate cancer patients shown in the above chart, the estimated survival rate at six months was 96%.
At Cancer Treatment Centers of America, we understand that you may also wish to see the survival rates of the group of metastatic prostate cancer patients reported in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database of the National Cancer Institute. Therefore, we asked an independent biostatistician to analyze both the survival rates of the group of CTCA patients and the group of patients included in the SEER database. We also want to be sure you understand that cancer is a complex disease and each person’s medical condition is different; therefore, CTCA makes no claims about the efficacy of specific treatments, the delivery of care, nor the meaning of the CTCA and SEER analyses. This analysis included prostate cancer patients from CTCA who were diagnosed from 2000 to 2011 (including 2000 and 2011) with a primary tumor site (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+)) of C619, and were considered analytic cases by the CTCA. Primary tumor sites (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+)), date of initial diagnosis, date of last contact, year of initial diagnosis, age of initial diagnosis, gender, vital status, and cancer histologic type as coded by the ICD-O-3.
The database from the CTCA cohort was prepared by the CTCA cancer registrars from the following four hospitals: Southwestern Regional Medical Center hospital, Midwestern Regional Medical Center hospital, Eastern Regional Medical Center hospital, and Western Regional Medical Center hospital. The SEER program of the National Cancer Institute is an authoritative source of information on cancer incidence and survival in the United States.
This analysis included prostate cancer patients from the latest SEER Limited-Use Database (as of 2014) who were diagnosed from 2000 to 2011 (including 2000 and 2011) with a primary tumor site (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+)) of C619.
Primary tumor sites (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+)), survival time recode as calculated by the date of initial diagnosis and the date of death or the follow-up cutoff date, year of initial diagnosis, age of initial diagnosis, gender, vital status, and cancer histologic type as coded by the ICD-O-3.
In order to make a meaningful survival analysis, basic cancer and patient characteristics such as age at initial diagnosis, year of initial diagnosis, cancer stages, and cancer primary sites were first analyzed for both the CTCA and SEER samples. For example, if a specific primary tumor site had patients in only one database, none of those patients were used in the analysis.
The survival outcome from the CTCA database was defined as the time from the initial diagnosis to death and computed in number of years as the difference between the date of death and the date of initial diagnosis divided by 365.25. For each survival outcome from each database, the survival curve, defined as the probability of cancer patient survival as a function of time after the initial diagnosis, was estimated by the nonparametric product-limit method[1]. Covariates such as age at initial diagnosis and year of initial diagnosis could affect the survival of prostate cancer patients. We understand you may be feeling overwhelmed with questions and concerns about your type of cancer and what it all means. Explore our cancer hospitals, which house the latest treatments, technologies and integrative oncology services under one roof.
Discover our patient-centered approach, and how you get all your questions answered in a single visit by a dedicated team of cancer experts. When you are told you have lung cancer and begin looking for treatment options, you may be concerned about life expectancy and quality of life.
The chart below shows the cancer survival rates of 1,015 metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. Of the CTCA metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients shown in the above chart, the estimated survival rate at six months was 70%.


The independent biostatistician computed the survival outcomes of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients from the CTCA database and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients from the SEER database who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. The chart below shows the cancer survival rates for a group of 1,309 metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2011. Of the CTCA metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients shown in the above chart, the estimated survival rate at six months was 65%. At Cancer Treatment Centers of America, we understand that you may also wish to see the survival rates of the group of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients reported in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database of the National Cancer Institute. This analysis included non-small cell lung cancer patients from CTCA who were diagnosed from 2000 to 2011 (including 2000 and 2011) with primary tumor sites (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+)) from C340 to C343, and were considered analytic cases by the CTCA. This analysis included non-small cell lung cancer patients from the latest SEER Limited-Use Database (as of 2014) who were diagnosed from 2000 to 2011 (including 2000 and 2011) with primary tumor sites (as coded by ICD-O-2 (1973+)) from C340 to 343. In order to make a meaningful survival analysis, basic cancer and patient characteristics such as age at initial diagnosis, year of initial diagnosis, cancer stages, cancer primary sites, and gender were first analyzed for both the CTCA and SEER samples. Cancer stages contribute significantly to the survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients. Covariates such as age at initial diagnosis and year of initial diagnosis could affect the survival of non-small cell lung cancer patients.
Each of these state-of-the-art cancer centers is staffed by cancer experts who use leading-edge technologies and advanced treatments to deliver personalized, whole-person care. Our team of cancer experts utilizes sophisticated technology and advanced cancer treatments, in addition to integrative therapies designed to improve your quality of life. As they began to get to know each other they found out they had both attended the same church at different times and that they had mutual friends.
She had an appointment with her gynecologist coming up and waited until then to talk to a doctor.
She got the diagnoses on Monday and one of her friends (who Kyle had asked to help with the engagement surprise) called Kyle and asked if he was still going to propose. At Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA), we believe you have the right to know our statistics for prostate cancer treatment outcomes, so you can choose the best cancer care for you and your family. Therefore, we asked an independent biostatistician to analyze the survival results of CTCA® patients. This means that six months after their diagnosis, 95% of the patients in this group were still living. Therefore, we asked the same independent biostatistician to analyze both the survival rates of CTCA patients and those of patients included in the SEER database. Therefore, SEER is currently the most comprehensive database for the analysis of CTCA results and national results. Our fifth hospital, located near Atlanta, Georgia, was not included because it was not open to patients until August 2012. Across all the 11 cancer types whose survival results are presented on the CTCA website, 0.48% of the CTCA patients included in the analyses were only diagnosed by CTCA and received no initial course of treatment from CTCA.
In both cases, the patients had been diagnosed with metastatic or distant cancer – cancer that had traveled from the primary site (prostate) to one or more distant sites in the body where it continued to grow. These factors significantly reduced the size of the CTCA sample, which means that the estimates reflected in the survival chart may be subject to high variation and may not be replicated in the future when we have a larger CTCA sample for analysis. Not all cancer patients who are treated at a CTCA hospital may experience these same results. This means that six months after their diagnosis, 96% of the patients in this group were still living. SEER is a source of population-based information about cancer incidence and survival in the United States that includes the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis and patient survival data. The independent biostatistician computed the survival outcomes of metastatic prostate cancer patients from the CTCA database and metastatic prostate cancer patients from the SEER database who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2011. More specifically, the SEER Limited-Use Database contained a combination of three databases.
The survival outcome from the SEER database was provided by the SEER Limited-Use Data File as the number of completed years and the number of completed months.
Formal statistical analyses of the prostate cancer survival distributions between the CTCA database and the SEER database were conducted by the nonparametric logrank test and Wilcoxon test as well as the likelihood ratio test[1]. Similar estimates were also computed to estimate the difference of the survival rates at these time points between the two cohorts. Therefore, additional adjusted analyses were completed on the survival outcomes between the CTCA and SEER samples after adjusting for the effects of these covariates. First, although a large cancer sample was available from the SEER program across many geographic regions in the United States, both samples, including the sample from CTCA, are convenience samples. At Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA), we believe you have the right to know our statistics for lung cancer treatment outcomes, so you can choose the best cancer care for you and your family. This means that six months after their diagnosis, 70% of the patients in this group were still living.
In both cases, the patients had been diagnosed with metastatic or distant cancer – cancer that had traveled from the primary site (lung) to one or more distant sites in the body where it continued to grow.


This means that six months after their diagnosis, 65% of the patients in this group were still living. The independent biostatistician computed the survival outcomes of metastatic cancer patients from the CTCA database and metastatic non-small cell lung cancer patients from the SEER database who were diagnosed between 2000 and 2011.
Formal statistical analyses of the non-small cell lung cancer survival distributions between the CTCA database and the SEER database were conducted by the nonparametric logrank test and Wilcoxon test as well as the likelihood ratio test[1]. The CTCA® integrative treatment model treats cancer with conventional approaches like surgery, immunotherapy and chemotherapy, while also offering evidence-based supportive therapies to manage cancer-related side effects, all under one roof. The state-of-the-art, all-digital hospital serves cancer patients and their families from across the Southeast and beyond. Their lives had circled around one another but it was the Internet that finally connected them. While they were gone Samantha's friend, her parents and younger sister snuck into their house and did some major decorating. SEER collects information on cancer incidence, prevalence and survival from specific geographic areas that represent 28% of the population of the United States. In both cases, the patients had been diagnosed with distant (metastatic) cancer as discussed above. The SEER Program is a comprehensive source of population-based information in the United States that includes stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis and patient survival data.
Patients whose age at initial diagnosis fell into the overlap of the two ranges from the CTCA and SEER samples were included in the survival analysis. These were then converted to the number of years by dividing the number of total months by 12. Because the estimated survival curves might not estimate the survival probability at these specific time points, survival rates from the closest observed survival times were used. The nature of these convenience samples prevents a causal interpretation of the statistical inferences. A similar statistic for metastatic non-small cell lung cancer alone is not currently available. After looking at the test results the doctor told her it was probably fibrous tissue and that she should wait six months and then come back to see if there was any change.
Samantha says she thinks she said yes but that honestly she was crying so hard she's not sure she ever answered. It is also possible that the SEER database may contain some of the CTCA cancer cases that were part of the analysis.
This means the cancer had traveled from the primary site (prostate) to one or more distant sites in the body where it continued to grow. All comparative survival analyses were conducted separately for the mild to moderate cancer stage and the advanced cancer stage (defined by the SEER Summary Stage of 7) using patients from the CTCA and SEER databases. For these patients who were still alive or lost to follow-up at the time of entering the databases, their survival time was treated as statistically censored[1] at the difference between the date of last contact and the date of initial diagnosis. Because five-year survival rates have been popularly used in many cancer survival reports, five-year survival curves were also obtained by treating those who survived more than five years after the initial diagnosis as statistically censored at five years. Second, although some types of matching, as described above, were implemented to select the appropriate SEER and CTCA comparison samples, the distributions of important covariates such as age at initial diagnosis, race and year of initial diagnosis were not exactly the same between the CTCA sample and SEER sample.
This means the cancer had traveled from the primary site (lung) to one or more distant sites in the body where it continued to grow.
However, a surgeon suggested that she go ahead and remove it so that she wouldn't have to worry about it for six months. Regardless of whether or not she verbalized it, Kyle knew it was a yes and with the help of family and friends, one month later they were married. Because patients surviving more than five years remained part of the risk sets in the estimation of survival rates at any time within five years of diagnosis, the truncated survival curves were identical to the first portion of the complete survival curves. Hence, even with the adjusted analyses, the possible confounding of these factors to the analyses and results cannot be ruled out. Hence, even with the adjusted analysis, the possible confounding of these factors to the analyses and results cannot be ruled out. Another Cox proportional hazards model was also used to simultaneously adjust for the effects of both covariates (age at diagnosis and year of initial diagnosis) in the survival analysis.
Third, the survival analyses were based on the statistical comparisons of the rate of death from all possible causes, not solely the cancer-specific death.
Data from CTCA are not available for a statistical comparison on cancer cause-specific death rates.



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