10.09.2015

Cancer biology journal

Epigenetic mechanisms regulate multiple aspects of normal development (stem cell maintenance, differentiation). Cachexia is a complex syndrome characterized by a marked weight loss that affects most cancer patients (particularly those in an advanced phase). The Research Group on Biochemistry and Molecular Biology in Cancer, led by Professor Josep M. Argiles and SA­lvia Busquets, from the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the Faculty of Biology of the UB and the Institute of Biomedicine of the UB (IBUB), affiliated centres with the campus of international excellence BKC, are the authors of the digital book Cancer cachexia, edited by Future Medicine.


From a clinical point of view, there is an inverse relationship between the degree of cachexia and patient's survival; in 20% of cases the syndrome may be the main cause of death. Also associated with anorexia, asthenia and anaemia, it generates important metabolic abnormalities and is related to the mechanisms of inflammatory response and insulin resistance. Throughout its five chapters, international experts review most recent findings in cancer cachexia and analyse how it can be treated.
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It also works on the analysis of the regulation mechanisms of routes involved in cancer cachexia (activation of uncoupling proteins, apoptosis of skeletal muscle cells, etc.) in order to design new therapeutic strategies that may reverse this pathological condition. Create your slideshowBy using the code above and embedding this image, you consent to Getty Images' Terms of Use.



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