07.01.2015

Bowel cancer screening test nhs

Yorkshire’s best loved poet, the Bard of Barnsley Ian McMillan, is backing a Leeds bowel cancer campaign – with poetry about poo. Ian is helping raise awareness among 60-74 year-olds about the importance of taking the NHS bowel cancer screening test for Bowel Cancer Awareness Month in April. He has penned a poem, called ‘Poo Sticks’, for NHS Leeds South and East Clinical Commissioning Group. Ian got involved in the campaign after hearing about efforts by the NHS in Leeds and Leeds City Council’s Public Health team to encourage more people in Leeds to take the test, including piloting a special helper kit to make the test easier to do. All 60-74 year-olds in England receive the bowel cancer screening test, which can be completed at home, every two years.
Philip Lewer, Chair of NHS Leeds South and East Clinical Commissioning Group said: “Like Ian, I am also eligible to take the test and I’ve made sure I take it whenever I am sent it. Why screening tests are importantGetting the right screening test at the right time is one of the most important things you can do for your health. To provide even greater transparency and choice, we are working on a number of other cookie-related enhancements. If you continue to use the site without changing your settings, we'll assume you agree to this. Manchester Public Health Development Service are urging women to attend screening for the disease, which is more than twice as prevalent in Manchester than the national average. Local women of aged 47 a€“ 73 are currently being invited to attend their breast screening appointment.
We are urging women to attend screening for the disease, which is more than twice as prevalent in Manchester than the national average. Why screening tests are importantGetting the right screening test at the right time is one of the most important things a man can do for his health.
It carries a positive message delivered with Ian’s trademark wit and no-nonsense Yorkshire manner.
Currently around 58% of people take the test in Leeds, but this drops to less than 30% in some parts of the city.
The test can detect the signs of bowel cancer even before symptoms appear, which is crucial in tackling a disease that is one of the easiest cancers to treat successfully if caught early enough.
Ian is such a popular writer, we’re delighted that he is backing our bowel cancer screening campaign in Leeds. Screening identifies diseases like cancer or diabetes early, often before you have symptoms, and when they’re usually easier to treat. It is intended for general information purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. We hope his fantastic poem will encourage people to talk about the test and feel more comfortable about taking it.
It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the BootsWebMD Site. That's because the smaller the cancer is when it's found, the better the chance for a surgical cure. Testicular cancerThis uncommon cancer develops in a man's testicles, the reproductive glands that produce sperm. Smaller breast cancers are also less likely to have spread to lymph nodes and other organs such as the lungs and brain. All women aged 50 – 70 are routinely invited to have a free NHS breast screening every three years. Most testicular and scrotal lumps are not cancerous, but it is essential to get any abnormality checked. Younger women with risk factors or specific concerns may also be referred to a hospital breast clinic. Men with a family history of testicular cancer or who have an undescended testicle are at a higher risk. A way to prevent bowel cancer is to find and remove colon polyps before they turn cancerous. Persistent infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major risk factor for cervical cancer (shown here, magnified).
Routine screening for HPV and abnormal precancerous cells helps to prevent cancer developing. Smear test – cervical screeningDoctors have been using a smear test to screen for abnormalities which could lead to cancer of the cervix if they are not treated. In 2016, the NHS cervical screening programme in England announced that it is changing to testing for HPV first rather than looking for cell changes in the cervix.
Most cases of cervical cancer are caused by infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV) - so experts hope that identifying this risk earlier will lead to more accurate screening. A similar alternative is a flexible sigmoidoscopy that examines only the lower part of the colon. Those women found to have HPV will be offered a smear test to identify if abnormal cells are present.


Osteoporosis and fractured bonesOsteoporosis is a condition in which bones become weak and fragile. More men than women die from this potentially fatal form of skin cancer, possibly because men are less likely to check suspect moles. The first symptom is often a painful bone fracture that can occur with only a minor fall, blow or even just a twist of the body. It is possible to both prevent and treat osteoporosis, which the NHS says affects around three million people in the UK.
Osteoporosis screening testsA test called dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) can measure bone mineral density and detect osteoporosis before fractures occur. Screening for skin cancerCancer Research UK urges men to keep an eye on mole changes of shape, colour and size.. You may be offered a DXA scan if you are thought to be at a high-risk of developing osteoporosis.
Some people may have a genetic risk factor for melanoma, and the risk increases with overexposure to the sun and sunburn. High blood pressure can lead to severe complications without any prior symptoms, including an aneurysm - dangerous ballooning of an artery. And melanomas that are detected at a thinner stage can be treated more successfully than thick ones that have grown deeper into the skin. Screening for skin cancerDoctors say it is important to regularly check your own skin for anything unusual, like a mole that’s grown bigger or changed colour. High blood pressure can lead to severe complications without any prior symptoms, including an aneurysm. In between those two is pressure that is still considered normal but higher than is desirable and at greater risk of developing into high blood pressure. How often blood pressure should be checked depends on how high it is and what other risk factors you have.
When it is, you reduce your risk of complications such as heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Cholesterol levelsA high level of LDL cholesterol in the blood causes sticky plaque to build up in the walls of your arteries (seen here in lighter orange). Finding out you have high blood pressure and then working with your doctor to manage it can pay huge health dividends. Atherosclerosis - narrowing of the arteries - can progress without symptoms for many years. The first (systolic) is the pressure of your blood against your artery walls when the heart beats. Lifestyle changes and medication can reduce this "bad" cholesterol and lower your risk of cardiovascular disease. Testing cholesterol levelsThe fasting blood lipid test is used to check your levels of total cholesterol, LDL "bad" cholesterol, HDL "good" cholesterol, and triglycerides (blood fat). The results tell you and your doctor a lot about what you need to do to reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke.
Anyone can have their blood cholesterol level tested, but it is more important if you are over 40, obese, have high blood pressure, diabetes or a family history of heart problems.
Type 2 diabetesDiabetes UK estimates 590,000 people in the UK have type 2 diabetes but don't know they have it. Cholesterol levelsA high level of LDL cholesterol is a major factor that increases the risk of developing atherosclerosis - hardening and narrowing of the arteries caused by plaque (seen here in orange) building up inside your arteries. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness from damage to the blood vessels of the retina (shown here), nerve damage and erectile dysfunction (impotence). Especially when found early, diabetes can be controlled and the risk of complications reduced with diet, exercise, weight loss and medication.
Screening for type 2 diabetesA fasting blood glucose test is most often used to screen for diabetes. Lifestyle changes and medication can lower your risk of atherosclerosis and of cardiovascular disease. Determining cholesterol levelsDoctors screen for problems with cholesterol by using a fasting blood lipid test. If you have a higher risk, including high cholesterol or high blood pressure, your GP may suggest testing earlier and more frequently.
It’s a blood test that tells you your levels of total cholesterol, LDL “bad” cholesterol, HDL “good” cholesterol, and triglyceride (blood fat). It's in the blood and other body secretions of infected individuals, even when there are no symptoms. Anyone can ask for a cholesterol test, but this is especially important if you are over 40 or have risk factors such as heart disease, are overweight, have high blood pressure, diabetes or a family history of high cholesterol or of cardiovascular disease. It spreads from one person to another when blood and these other secretions come in contact with the penis, anal area, mouth, eyes or a break in the skin. Type 2 diabetesMore than 3 million people in the UK are diagnosed with diabetes and many more have the condition but are unaware of it.
Diabetes can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness from damage to the retina (shown here) and nerve damage.


Modern treatments can keep HIV infection from becoming AIDS, but like other medications these treatments can have side effects. However, especially when found early, diabetes can be controlled with diet, exercise, weight loss and medication when appropriate, and the risk of complications reduced.
Screening for type 2 diabetesA fasting blood glucose test is most often used to screen for diabetes and prediabetes.
A vial of blood is taken after you’ve fasted at least eight hours and used to determine your blood sugar level. If you were recently infected, you could still have a negative result, as the tests may not detect HIV until three months after infection. Diabetes screening is typically offered if your GP suspects you may be at risk of having diabetes.
If you think you may have been exposed to HIV, ask your GP, GUM clinic or sexual health charity about the tests. Preventing the spread of HIVMost newly infected individuals test positive by three months after infection. It’s in the blood and other body secretions of infected individuals, even when there are no symptoms. It spreads from one person to another when blood or these secretions come into contact with the vagina, anal area, mouth, eyes or a break in the skin. Safe sex - abstinence or always using latex barriers such as a condom or a dental dam - is necessary to reduce the risk of getting HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. There is still no cure or vaccine, but treatment with anti-viral medications may help the body's immune system fight the virus.
If you have HIV and are pregnant, talk with your doctor about what needs to be done to reduce the risk of HIV infection in your unborn child. GlaucomaThis group of eye diseases gradually damages the optic nerve and may lead to blindness - and significant, irreversible vision loss can occur before people with glaucoma notice any symptoms.
Screening tests look for abnormally high pressure within the eye, to identify and treat the condition before damage to the optic nerve occurs. Some people may be advised to have eye tests more frequently, such as those over age 40 with glaucoma in the family. People of African, or African-Caribbean origin, tend to have a greater risk of developing glaucoma. It tends to be a slow-growing cancer, but there are also aggressive, fast-growing types of prostate cancer.
If you think you may have been exposed to HIV, ask your GP or sexual health clinic about the tests.
The NHS says there is currently no screening programme for prostate cancer in the UK because it has not been proven that the benefits of screening would outweigh the risks. Bowel cancerBowel cancer is the third most common cancer in the UK with more than 41,000 new cases diagnosed every year. Tests for prostate cancerTesting for prostate cancer may include both a digital rectal examination (DRE) and a prostate specific antigen (PSA) blood test. The majority of colon (bowel) cancers develop from colon polyps that are growths on the inner surface of the colon. Before you decide whether or not to have these tests, your doctor should talk to you about the advantages and disadvantages. Screening for bowel cancerIn 2006 the NHS began a bowel cancer screening programme using stool samples. It's offered to everyone aged between 60 and 69, every two years, and is being extended to include those aged 70-75. For anyone at high risk, for example with a family history of bowel cancer, a colonoscopy can be performed. GlaucomaGlaucoma is a condition that can result in blindness due to damage to the optic nerve.
There is good evidence that treating elevated eye pressure in glaucoma can prevent blindness. Glaucoma screeningIt is important to have regular eye tests with an optician so that conditions like glaucoma can be picked up. People with a higher risk of glaucoma should be checked from the age of 30 -- these include people with a family history of glaucoma.
Check-ups with an optician are often not free of charge, unless you are in a group entitled to free tests, such as people over 60 or those with conditions such as glaucoma or diabetes.
Importance of health screeningBeing proactive and discussing screening tests with your doctor makes good health sense.
Some tests, such as a cervical screening test, should be a routine part of every woman’s health care.
Appropriate screening won’t always prevent a disease, but it can identify a disease early enough to give you the best chance of overcoming it.



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