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Highly recommended and Excalibur-House of M Prequel Decimation- The Day After Son of M (this chronicles the aftermath of Quicksilver) and the subsequent Civil War cross-over event are also recommended. Skin thickening or pitting (lipohypertrophy) if injection diabetes essay questions given too frequently into the same site. You can go on a mission for a few months and then come back and settle into your life or you can do what I did and sell or get rid of Dictionary Definition Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus everything contour blood glucose monitoring system test strips and just work most of the time.
Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the body does not use insulin efficiently Fibrous Vegetables and Oils american Dictionary Definition Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus diabetic diet 1800 calories dr. Orally-ingested insulin layersomes could eventually replace injections (Photo: Shutterstock). Diabetics should eat from all food groups for a balanced diet whole grains vegetables Fruits omeg3 rich nuts oils and fish Legumes lean meats. Most of these people do not have Nutritionist backgronds and obviously lack the self control required for the plan to be diabetic insulin pump side effects affective: Pizza bread sweets. Send Home Our method Usage examples Index Statistics Advertise with us ContactWe do not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any content in this site.
Diabetes define diabetes dictionary., Diabetes definition any of several disorders characterized by increased urine production.
Catalyst define catalyst dictionary., Catalyst [(katuhlist)] in chemistry a substance that causes a chemical reaction to occur but is not itself involved in the reaction.
T? game o i du?ng ph? cho mobile, Game vo si duong pho danh nhau d?ng c?p ta?i game vo si du?ng ph? da?m ba?o ba?n choi 1 la?n la? me game danh nhau vo si du?ng ph?. Diabetes Mellitus DefinitionDiabetes mellitus is a condition in which the pancreas no longer produces enough insulin or cells stop responding to the insulin that is produced, so that glucose in the blood cannot be absorbed into the cells of the body. Several common medications can impair the body's use of insulin, causing a condition known as secondary diabetes.
Any therapy that lowers stress levels also can be useful in treating diabetes by helping to reduce insulin requirements. First off…as a person losing weight this inspiring because I believe i have a cute face. HIV-positive people with vitamin D deficiency were far more likely to also have type 2 diabetes than people who were not vitamin D deficient according to a study published online December 20 in the journal AIDS.
Neither the service provider nor the domain owner maintain any relationship with the advertisers. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe hyperglycemia, rapid progression to diabetic ketoacidosis, and death unless treated with insulin. These medications include treatments for high blood pressure (furosemide, clonidine, and thiazide diuretics), drugs with hormonal activity (oral contraceptives, thyroid hormone, progestins, and glucocorticorids), and the anti-inflammation drug indomethacin.
Among the alternative treatments that aim to lower stress are hypnotherapy, biofeedback, and meditation.PrognosisUncontrolled diabetes is a leading cause of blindness, end-stage renal disease, and limb amputations. Most of these pharmacological effects may synergistically contribute to alleviating type 2 diabetes-related symptoms. Early warning symptoms of hypoglycemia may be different or less pronounced under certain conditions such as long duration of diabetes diabetic nerve disease medications such as beta-blockers change in insulin preparations or intensified control (3 or more insulin injections per day) of diabetes. Provides a new yet simple plan to follow based on your diet prescription stevia diabetes 2 weekly. Successful diabetes care requires two-way diabetes food diet plan communication between health care providers and patients 1 involvement of patients in treatment decisions 2 and active participation of patients in self-care and goal setting.
In case of trademark issues please contact the domain owner directly (contact information can be found in whois). The treatment includes changes in diet, oral medications, and in some cases, daily injections of insulin.DescriptionDiabetes mellitus is a chronic disease that causes serious health complications including renal (kidney) failure, heart disease, stroke, and blindness. Several drugs that are used to treat mood disorders (such as anxiety and depression) also can impair glucose absorption. Diabetic Recipe – Oatmeal diabetes medications patient education handout Chocolate Chip ( around 30 pieces ).
IGF-I is transported in serum by several proteins; this helps maintain relatively high I know what it is like to overcome an addiction and yes, it is incredibly difficult, I failed many attempts to quit, it took almost a decade to quit completely. Among the maxims carved on the entrances to the Greek temple of Apollo at Delphi, perhaps the most familiar and important were "know thyself" and "nothing in excess." We have reached a point, two and a half millenia later, where we could really use both pieces of advice. These drugs include haloperidol, lithium carbonate, phenothiazines, tricyclic antidepressants, and adrenergic agonists.
Eye problems including cataracts, glaucoma, and diabetic retinopathy also are more common in diabetics.Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a condition where nerve endings, particularly in the legs and feet, become less sensitive. This is a medical emergency requiring prompt treatment since continuous diabetes guidelines singapore eizure activity lasting over 30 minutes can cause life-threatening abnormalities and brain damage. It was a little much for just a broken toe, but i told my ex (who is the dumbest of 8th grade dumb blondes) that I needed to get my foot amputated and it would either be metal or fiberglass. Wow nobody mentioned your reddit switch-a-roo I opened a new box of Luvs and noticed a change - they are thinner, flimsy, and green at the waistband. Unfortunately, as many as one-half are unaware they have it.BackgroundEvery cell in the human body needs energy in order to function. Other medications that can cause diabetes symptoms include isoniazid, nicotinic acid, cimetidine, and heparin.
Diabetic foot ulcers are a particular problem since the patient does not feel the pain of a blister, callous, or other minor injury. But some studies seem to indicate that at least part of the benefit can come from bariatric surgery itself Dictionary Definition Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus not just the associated weight loss.
Fasting serum insulin decreased in the intervention but increased in the control group at 6 months ( p < 001 ) , remaining different at 1 year ( p = 005 ) . Insulin also helps move glucose (blood sugar) into cells, where it can be stored and used for energy.
The body's primary energy source is glucose, a simple sugar resulting from the digestion of foods containing carbohydrates (sugars and starches). A 2004 study found that low levels of the essential mineral chromium in the body may be linked to increased risk for diseases associated with insulin resistance.SymptomsSymptoms of diabetes can develop suddenly (over days or weeks) in previously healthy children or adolescents, or can develop gradually (over several years) in overweight adults over the age of 40. Glucose from the digested food circulates in the blood as a ready energy source for any cells that need it.
The classic symptoms include feeling tired and sick, frequent urination, excessive thirst, excessive hunger, and weight loss.Ketoacidosis, a condition due to starvation or uncontrolled diabetes, is common in Type I diabetes. The inability to sense pain along with the complications of delayed wound healing can result in minor injuries, blisters, or callouses becoming infected and difficult to treat. I'm using myfitnesspal under the same name as my reddit name :) Chase this recipe with grape juice. Insulin is a hormone or chemical produced by cells in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. Ketones are acid compounds that form in the blood when the body breaks down fats and proteins.
Insulin bonds to a receptor site on the outside of cell and acts like a key to open a doorway into the cell through which glucose can enter. Symptoms include abdominal pain, vomiting, rapid breathing, extreme lethargy, and drowsiness.
The most serious consequence of this condition is the need for amputation of toes, feet, or legs due to severe infection.Heart disease and kidney disease are common complications of diabetes. Some of the glucose can be converted to concentrated energy sources like glycogen or fatty acids and saved for later use. When there is not enough insulin produced or when the doorway no longer recognizes the insulin key, glucose stays in the blood rather entering the cells.The body will attempt to dilute the high level of glucose in the blood, a condition called hyperglycemia, by drawing water out of the cells and into the bloodstream in an effort to dilute the sugar and excrete it in the urine. Left untreated, this condition can lead to coma and death.With Type II diabetes, the condition may not become evident until the patient presents for medical treatment for some other condition.
While the onset of Type I diabetes is unpredictable, the risk of developing Type II diabetes can be reduced by maintaining ideal weight and exercising regularly. A type 1 diabetes diet is designed to provide maximum nutrition, while limiting sugar, carbohydrates, and sodium. It is not unusual for people with undiagnosed diabetes to be constantly thirsty, drink large quantities of water, and urinate frequently as their bodies try to get rid of the extra glucose.
A patient may have heart disease, chronic infections of the gums and urinary tract, blurred vision, numbness in the feet and legs, or slow-healing wounds. This creates high levels of glucose in the urine.At the same time that the body is trying to get rid of glucose from the blood, the cells are starving for glucose and sending signals to the body to eat more food, thus making patients extremely hungry.
To provide energy for the starving cells, the body also tries to convert fats and proteins to glucose.
Urine tests and blood tests can be used to confirm a diagnose of diabetes based on the amount of glucose found.
The breakdown of fats and proteins for energy causes acid compounds called ketones to form in the blood.
Urine can also detect ketones and protein in the urine that may help diagnose diabetes and assess how well the kidneys are functioning. These tests also can be used to monitor the disease once the patient is on a standardized diet, oral medications, or insulin.Urine testsClinistix and Diastix are paper strips or dipsticks that change color when dipped in urine. Without proper diet, exercise, and insulin therapy, a person with type 1 diabetes could suffer adverse health effects. The test strip is compared to a chart that shows the amount of glucose in the urine based on the change in color. Health complications associated with this type of diabetes include: vision problems high blood pressure, which increases risk for heart attack, stroke, and poor circulation kidney damage nerve damage skin sores and infections, which can cause pain and may lead to tissue death Following proper dietary guidelines can help mitigate the difficulties of type 1 diabetes, keep your health free from complications, and make your life better overall.
This condition can be life threatening if left untreated, leading to coma and death.Types of diabetes mellitusType I diabetes, sometimes called juvenile diabetes, begins most commonly in childhood or adolescence. Testing the urine with a test stick, paper strip, or tablet that changes color when sugar is present is not as accurate as blood testing, however it can give a fast and simple reading.Ketones in the urine can be detected using similar types of dipstick tests (Acetest or Ketostix).
It is characterized by a sudden onset and occurs more frequently in populations descended from Northern European countries (Finland, Scotland, Scandinavia) than in those from Southern European countries, the Middle East, or Asia.
Ketoacidosis can be a life-threatening situation in Type I diabetics, so having a quick and simple test to detect ketones can assist in establishing a diagnosis sooner.Another dipstick test can determine the presence of protein or albumin in the urine. A nutritionist or dietitian can help you come up with meal plans, and create a diet that works for you in the long term. Protein in the urine can indicate problems with kidney function and can be used to track the development of renal failure.
This form also is called insulin-dependent diabetes because people who develop this type need to have daily injections of insulin.Brittle diabetics are a subgroup of Type I where patients have frequent and rapid swings of blood sugar levels between hyperglycemia (a condition where there is too much glucose or sugar in the blood) and hypoglycemia (a condition where there are abnormally low levels of glucose or sugar in the blood). A more sensitive test for urine protein uses radioactively tagged chemicals to detect microalbuminuria, small amounts of protein in the urine, that may not show up on dipstick tests.Blood testsFASTING GLUCOSE TEST. These patients may require several injections of different types of insulin during the day to keep the blood sugar level within a fairly normal range.The more common form of diabetes, Type II, occurs in approximately 3-5% of Americans under 50 years of age, and increases to 10-15% in those over 50.
Blood is drawn from a vein in the patient's arm after a period at least eight hours when the patient has not eaten, usually in the morning before breakfast. The red blood cells are separated from the sample and the amount of glucose is measured in the remaining plasma. Sometimes called age-onset or adult-onset diabetes, this form of diabetes occurs most often in people who are overweight and who do not exercise.
It is also more common in people of Native American, Hispanic, and African-American descent.
The fasting glucose test is usually repeated on another day to confirm the results.POSTPRANDIAL GLUCOSE TEST. Having a well-stocked kitchen or carrying healthy snacks with you can cut down on unnecessary sugar, carbohydrates, sodium, and fat that can spike blood sugar. People who have migrated to Western cultures from East India, Japan, and Australian Aboriginal cultures also are more likely to develop Type II diabetes than those who remain in their original countries.Type II is considered a milder form of diabetes because of its slow onset (sometimes developing over the course of several years) and because it usually can be controlled with diet and oral medication. The consequences of uncontrolled and untreated Type II diabetes, however, are the just as serious as those for Type I.
Blood samples are taken from a vein before and after a patient drinks a thick, sweet syrup of glucose and other sugars.
To maintain blood sugar levels, dont skip meals, and try to eat around the same time each day. This form is also called noninsulin-dependent diabetes, a term that is somewhat misleading. In a non-diabetic, the level of glucose in the blood goes up immediately after the drink and then decreases gradually as insulin is used by the body to metabolize, or absorb, the sugar. Many people with Type II diabetes can control the condition with diet and oral medications, however, insulin injections are sometimes necessary if treatment with diet and oral medication is not working.Another form of diabetes called gestational diabetes can develop during pregnancy and generally resolves after the baby is delivered. In a diabetic, the glucose in the blood goes up and stays high after drinking the sweetened liquid. This diabetic condition develops during the second or third trimester of pregnancy in about 2% of pregnancies. In 2004, incidence of gestational diabetes were reported to have increased 35% in 10 years. A small needle or lancet is used to prick the finger and a drop of blood is collected and analyzed by a monitoring device.
Children of women with gestational diabetes are more likely to be born prematurely, have hypoglycemia, or have severe jaundice at birth. Some patients may test their blood glucose levels several times during a day and use this information to adjust their doses of insulin.TreatmentThere is currently no cure for diabetes. Fruits Fruits are natural sources of sugar and should be counted as carbohydrates if youre using a diet plan.
Treatment of diabetes focuses on two goals: keeping blood glucose within normal range and preventing the development of long-term complications. Careful monitoring of diet, exercise, and blood glucose levels are as important as the use of insulin or oral medications in preventing complications of diabetes.
In Type I diabetes, the immune system, the body's defense system against infection, is believed to be triggered by a virus or another microorganism that destroys cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. In 2003, the American Diabetes Association updated its Standards of Care for the management of diabetes.


In Type II diabetes, age, obesity, and family history of diabetes play a role.In Type II diabetes, the pancreas may produce enough insulin, however, cells have become resistant to the insulin produced and it may not work as effectively. These standards help manage health care providers in the most recent recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of the disease.Dietary changesDiet and moderate exercise are the first treatments implemented in diabetes. As a consequence, there is the passage of a large amount of urine having a low specific gravity, and great thirst; it is often attended by voracious appetite, loss of strength, and emaciation. Symptoms of Type II diabetes can begin so gradually that a person may not know that he or she has it. For many Type II diabetics, weight loss may be an important goal in helping them to control their diabetes. Diabetes insipidus may be acquired through infection, neoplasm, trauma, or radiation injuries to the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland or it may be inherited or idiopathic. A well-balanced, nutritious diet provides approximately 50-60% of calories from carbohydrates, approximately 10-20% of calories from protein, and less than 30% of calories from fat. Other symptoms may include sudden weight loss, slow wound healing, urinary tract infections, gum disease, or blurred vision.
The number of calories required by an individual depends on age, weight, and activity level.
A synthetic analogue of vasopressin (DDAVP) can be administered as a nasal spray, providing antidiuretic activity for 8 to 20 hours, and is currently the drug of choice.
The calorie intake also needs to be distributed over the course of the entire day so surges of glucose entering the blood system are kept to a minimum.Keeping track of the number of calories provided by different foods can become complicated, so patients usually are advised to consult a nutritionist or dietitian.
Patient care includes instruction in self-administration of the drug, its expected action, symptoms that indicate a need to adjust the dosage, and the importance of follow-up visits. These include: most green leafy vegetables asparagus beets carrots celery cucumber onions peppers sprouts tomatoes Always choose fresh or frozen vegetables without added salt or sauces. Patients with this condition should wear some form of medical identification at all times.gestational diabetes diabetes mellitus with onset or first recognition during pregnancy, usually during the second or third trimester. Both the American Diabetes Association and the American Dietetic Association recommend diets based on the use of food exchange lists.
Each food exchange contains a known amount of calories in the form of protein, fat, or carbohydrate. It often disappears after the end of the pregnancy, but many women with this condition develop permanent diabetes mellitus in later life. A patient's diet plan will consist of a certain number of exchanges from each food category (meat or protein, fruits, breads and starches, vegetables, and fats) to be eaten at meal times and as snacks. Patients have flexibility in choosing which foods they eat as long as they stick with the number of exchanges prescribed.For many Type II diabetics, weight loss is an important factor in controlling their condition. Because insulin is involved in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, diabetes is not limited to a disturbance of glucose homeostasis alone. The food exchange system, along with a plan of moderate exercise, can help them lose excess weight and improve their overall health.Oral medicationsOral medications are available to lower blood glucose in Type II diabetics. The definitions and descriptions that follow are drawn from the Report of the Expert Committee on the Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus.
Carbohydrates can come in the form of beans, starchy vegetables, fruit juices, pasta, or bread. Oral antidiabetic agents accounted for more than $5 billion dollars in worldwide retail sales per year in the early twenty-first century and were the fastest-growing segment of diabetes drugs. Although other terms are found in older literature and remain in use, their use in current clinical practice is inappropriate. The drugs first prescribed for Type II diabetes are in a class of compounds called sulfonylureas and include tolbutamide, tolazamide, acetohexamide, and chlorpropamide. Epidemiologic and research studies are facilitated by use of a common language.The Expert Committee notes that most cases of diabetes fall into two broad categories, which are called Type 1 and Type 2.
Newer drugs in the same class are now available and include glyburide, glimeperide, and glipizide.
There are also other specific types, such as gestational diabetes and impaired glucose homeostasis. How these drugs work is not well understood, however, they seem to stimulate cells of the pancreas to produce more insulin. New medications that are available to treat diabetes include metformin, acarbose, and troglitizone. Diabetes is ranked third as a cause of death, although the life span of patients with diabetes has increased due to improved methods of detection and better management.
There is no cure for diabetes at the present time, but enormous strides have been made in the control of the disease.
Some for example, may stimulate weight gain or cause stomach irritation, so they may not be the best treatment for someone who is already overweight or who has stomach ulcers. The patient must understand the importance of compliance with the entire treatment plan, including diet, exercise, and in some cases medication. Others, like metformin, have been shown to have positive effects such as reduced cardiovascular mortality, but but increased risk in other situations. The patient with diabetes is at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, renal failure, neuropathies, and diabetic retinopathy. While these medications are an important aspect of treatment for Type II diabetes, they are not a substitute for a well planned diet and moderate exercise. Research studies such as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial have indicated that tight control of blood glucose levels resulted in the delay or prevention of retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. Oral medications have not been shown effective for Type I diabetes, in which the patient produces little or no insulin.Constant advances are being made in development of new oral medications for persons with diabetes.
In 2003, a drug called Metaglip combining glipizide and metformin was approved in a dingle tablet. The most common diagnostic tests for diabetes are chemical analyses of the blood such as the fasting plasma glucose. Capillary blood glucose monitoring can be used for screening large segments of the population. Portable equipment is available and only one drop of blood from the fingertip or earlobe is necessary.
Fruits, vegetables, nuts, and other foods travel easily and are great to have on hand when you need them.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) combines metformin and rosiglitazone (Avandia), a medication that increases muscle cells' sensitivity to insulin. Testing for urinary glucose can be problematic as the patient may have a high renal threshold, which would lead to a negative reading for urinary glucose when in fact the blood glucose level was high. The amount and type of insulin required depends on the height, weight, age, food intake, and activity level of the individual diabetic patient. Diabetes mellitus can present a wide variety of symptoms, from none at all to profound ketosis and coma. Some patients with Type II diabetes may need to use insulin injections if their diabetes cannot be controlled with diet, exercise, and oral medication. If the disease manifests itself late in life, patients may not know they have it until it is discovered during a routine examination, or when the symptoms of chronic vascular disease, insidious renal failure, or impaired vision cause them to seek medical help. Injections are given subcutaneously, that is, just under the skin, using a small needle and syringe. Injection sites can be anywhere on the body where there is looser skin, including the upper arm, abdomen, or upper thigh.Purified human insulin is most commonly used, however, insulin from beef and pork sources also are available. Because of insulin deficiency, the assimilation and storage of glucose in muscle adipose tissues, and the liver is greatly diminished. This produces an accumulation of glucose in the blood and creates an increase in its osmolarity.
Different types of insulin can be mixed and given in one dose or split into two or more doses during a day. In response to this increased osmotic pressure there is depletion of intracellular water and osmotic diuresis. Patients who require multiple injections over the course of a day may be able to use an insulin pump that administers small doses of insulin on demand. The small battery-operated pump is worn outside the body and is connected to a needle that is inserted into the abdomen. Pumps can be programmed to inject small doses of insulin at various times during the day, or the patient may be able to adjust the insulin doses to coincide with meals and exercise.Regular insulin is fast-acting and starts to work within 15-30 minutes, with its peak glucose-lowering effect about two hours after it is injected. It may be the result of the body's effort to increase its supply of energy foods even though eating more carbohydrates in the absence of sufficient insulin does not meet the energy needs of the cells.Fatigue and muscle weakness occur because the glucose needed for energy simply is not metabolized properly.
Weight loss in type 1 diabetes patients occurs partly because of the loss of body fluid and partly because in the absence of sufficient insulin the body begins to metabolize its own proteins and stored fat. NPH (neutral protamine Hagedorn) and Lente insulin are intermediate-acting, starting to work within one to three hours and lasting up to 18-26 hours. The oxidation of fats is incomplete, however, and the fatty acids are converted into ketone bodies. Ultra-lente is a long-acting form of insulin that starts to work within four to eight hours and lasts 28-36 hours.Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, can be caused by too much insulin, too little food (or eating too late to coincide with the action of the insulin), alcohol consumption, or increased exercise. When the kidney is no longer able to handle the excess ketones the patient develops ketosis. The overwhelming presence of the strong organic acids in the blood lowers the pH and leads to severe and potentially fatal ketoacidosis.The metabolism of body protein when sufficient amounts of insulin are not available causes an elevated blood urea nitrogen. This first occurs because the nitrogen component of protein is discarded in the blood when the body metabolizes its own proteins to obtain the glucose it needs.Persons with diabetes are prone to infection, delayed healing, and vascular disease. The ease with which poorly controlled diabetic persons develop an infection is thought to be due in part to decreased chemotaxis of leukocytes, abnormal phagocyte function, and diminished blood supply because of atherosclerotic changes in the blood vessels.
This condition is sometimes called an insulin reaction and should be treated by giving the patient something sweet to eat or drink like a candy, sugar cubes, juice, or another high sugar snack.SurgeryTransplantation of a healthy pancreas into a diabetic patient is a successful treatment, however, this transplant is usually done only if a kidney transplant is performed at the same time. An impaired blood supply means a deficit in the protective defensive cells transported in the blood.
Although a pancreas transplant is possible, it is not clear if the potential benefits outweigh the risks of the surgery and drug therapy needed.Alternative treatmentSince diabetes can be life-threatening if not properly managed, patients should not attempt to treat this condition without medicial supervision. Excessive glucose allows organisms to grow out of control.Another manifestation of diabetes mellitus is visual disturbance due to increased osmolarity of the blood and accumulation of fluid in the eyeball, which changes its shape. A variety of alternative therapies can be helpful in managing the symptoms of diabetes and supporting patients with the disease. Acupuncture can help relieve the pain associated with diabetic neuropathy by stimulation of cetain points. Persistent vaginitis and urinary tract infection also may be symptoms of diabetes in females.Sequelae. The long-term consequences of diabetes mellitus can involve both large and small blood vessels throughout the body. That in large vessels is usually seen in the coronary arteries, cerebral arteries, and arteries of the lower extremities and can eventually lead to myocardial infarction, stroke, or gangrene of the feet and legs. Although there is no herbal substitute for insulin, some herbs may help adjust blood sugar levels or manage other diabetic symptoms. Some believe that diabetics inherit the tendency to develop severe atherosclerosis as well as an aberration in glucose metabolism, and that the two are not necessarily related. There is strong evidence to substantiate the claim that optimal control will mitigate the effects of diabetes on the microvasculature, particularly in the young and middle-aged who are at greatest risk for developing complications involving the arterioles. Pathologic changes in the small blood vessels serving the kidney lead to nephrosclerosis, pyelonephritis, and other disorders that eventually result in renal failure.
Many of the deaths of persons with type 1 diabetes are caused by renal failure.Visual impairment and blindness are common sequelae of uncontrolled diabetes. The three most frequently occurring problems involving the eye are diabetic retinopathy, cataracts, and glaucoma. There may eventually be almost total anesthesia of the affected part with the potential for serious injury to the part without the patient being aware of it.
In contrast, some patients experience debilitating pain and hyperesthesia, with loss of deep tendon reflexes.Other problems related to the destruction of nerve tissue are the result of autonomic nervous system involvement. These include impotence, orthostatic hypotension, delayed gastric emptying, diarrhea or constipation, and asymptomatic retention of urine in the bladder.Although age of onset and length of the disease process are related to the frequency with which vascular, renal, and neurologic complications develop, there are some patients who remain relatively free of sequelae even into the later years of their lives. Because diabetes mellitus is not a single disease but rather a complex constellation of syndromes, each patient has a unique response to the disease process. There is no cure for diabetes; the goal of treatment is to maintain blood glucose and lipid levels within normal limits and to prevent complications.
In general, good control is achieved when the following occur: fasting plasma glucose is within a specific range (set by health care providers and the individual), glycosylated hemoglobin tests show that blood sugar levels have stayed within normal limits from one testing period to the next, the patient's weight is normal, blood lipids remain within normal limits, and the patient has a sense of health and well-being. The protocol for therapy is determined by the type of diabetes; patients with either type 1 or type 2 must pay attention to their diet and exercise regimens.
Insulin therapy may be prescribed for patients with type 2 diabetes as well as any who are dependent on insulin.
In most cases, the type 2 diabetes patient can be treated effectively by reducing caloric intake, maintaining target weight, and promoting physical exercise.Diet. In general, the diabetic diet is geared toward providing adequate nutrition with sufficient calories to maintain normal body weight; the intake of food is adjusted so that blood sugar and serum cholesterol levels are kept within acceptable limits.
In persons with type 2 diabetes this usually results in marked improvement and may eliminate the need for drugs such as oral hypoglycemic agents.The patient, physician, nurse, and dietician must carefully evaluate the patient's life style, nutritional needs, and ability to comply with the proposed dietary prescription. There are a variety of meal planning systems that can be used by the patient with diabetes; each has benefits and drawbacks that need to be evaluated in order to maximize compliance. Two of the most frequently used ones are the exchange system (see accompanying table) and the carbohydrate counting system.In the exchange system, foods are divided into six food groups (starch, meat, vegetable, fruit, milk, and fat) and the patient is taught to select items from each food group as ordered. Patient teaching should emphasize that a diabetic diet is a healthy diet that all members of the family can follow.The carbohydrate counting system focuses on matching the unit of insulin to the total number of grams of carbohydrate in food eaten.
Since the insulin-dependent diabetic needs to match food consumption to the available insulin, it is advantageous to increase the number of daily feedings by adding snacks between meals and at bedtime.Exercise. A program of regular exercise gives anyone a sense of good health and well-being; for persons with diabetes it gives added benefits by helping to control blood glucose levels, promoting circulation to peripheral tissues, and strengthening the heart beat. In addition, there is evidence that exercise increases the number of insulin receptor sites on the surface of cells and thus facilitates the metabolism of glucose. Many specialists in diabetes consider exercise so important in the management of diabetes that they prescribe rather than suggest exercise.Persons with diabetes who take insulin must be careful about indulging in unplanned exercise.


Strenuous physical activity can rapidly lower their blood sugar and precipitate a hypoglycemic reaction. At this range, the levels of insulin are too low and the body would have difficulty transporting glucose into exercising muscles. Exogenous insulin is given to patients with diabetes mellitus as a supplement to the insufficient amount of endogenous insulin that they produce. It must be given by injection, usually subcutaneously, and because it is a potent drug, the dosage must be measured meticulously.
Commonly, regular insulin, which is a fast-acting insulin with a short span of action, is mixed with one of the longer-acting insulins and both types are administered in one injection.Human insulin (Humulin) is produced by recombinant DNA technology. This highly purified biosynthetic insulin reduces the incidence of allergic reactions and the changes in subcutaneous tissues (lipodystrophy) at sites of injection.Recently, battery-operated insulin pumps have been developed that can be programmed to mimic normal insulin secretion more closely. A person wearing an insulin pump still must monitor blood sugar several times a day and adjust the dosage, and not all diabetic patients are motivated or suited to such vigilance. It is hoped that in the future an implantable or external pump system may be perfected, containing a glucose sensor. In response to data from the sensor the pump will automatically deliver insulin according to changing levels of blood glucose.Oral Agents.
Oral antidiabetic drugs (see hypoglycemic agents) are sometimes prescribed for patients with type 2 diabetes who cannot control their blood glucose with diet and exercise. These are not oral forms of insulin; they are sulfonylureas, chemically related to the sulfonamide antibiotics.
Patients receiving them should be taught that the drug they are taking does not eliminate the need for a diet and exercise program.
Only the prescribed dosage should be taken; it should never be increased to make up for dietary indiscretions or discontinued unless authorized by the physician.
Successful management of diabetes requires that the patient actively participate in and be committed to the regimen of care. The problem of poor control can cause serious or even deadly short-term and long-term complications, with devastating effects on the patient's longevity and sense of well being. There are many teaching aids available to help persons with diabetes understand their disease and comply with prescribed therapy.
In the past, urine testing was an integral part of the management of diabetes, but it has largely been replaced in recent years by self monitoring of blood glucose. Reasons for this are that blood testing is more accurate, glucose in the urine shows up only after the blood sugar level is high, and individual renal thresholds vary greatly and can change when certain medications are taken. As a person grows older and the kidney is less able to eliminate sugar in the urine, the renal threshold rises and less sugar is spilled into the urine.
The position statement of the American Diabetes Association on Tests of Glycemia in Diabetes notes that urine testing still plays a role in monitoring in type 1 and gestational diabetes, and in pregnancy with pre-existing diabetes, as a way to test for ketones.
All people with diabetes should test for ketones during times of acute illness or stress and when blood glucose levels are consistently elevated.2. Home glucose monitoring using either a visually read test or a digital readout of the glucose concentration in a drop of blood. More recent glucose monitoring devices can draw blood from other locations on the body, such as the forearm.3. Pathophysiology of diabetes mellitus, including functions of the pancreas and the long-term effects of uncontrolled diabetes.4. Insulin administration (if appropriate), including types of insulin and syringes, rotation of sites of injection, injection techniques, and pump therapy instructions.5. Each person responds differently and may exhibit symptoms different from those experienced by others. When there is doubt, a simple blood glucose reading will determine the actions that should be taken.6.
Oral antidiabetic agents, including information about drug-drug interactions, proper administration, and potential side effects.7.
Personal hygiene and activities of daily living, including general skin care, foot care, treatment of minor injuries to avoid infection, a formal exercise program as well as exercise at school or at work, recreational activity, and travel.8. Importance of keeping appointments and staying in touch with a health care provider for consultation and assessment. Periodic evaluation of the binding of glucose to hemoglobin (glycosylated hemoglobin or hemoglobin A1C testing) can give information about the effectiveness of the prescribed regimen and whether any changes need to be made.
The ADA position statement on tests of glycemia in diabetes recommends routine testing for all patients with diabetes. Characteristics include polyuria, extreme thirst, growth retardation, and developmental delay.
It is caused by an absolute or relative deficiency of insulin and is characterized, in more severe cases, by chronic hyperglycemia, glycosuria, water and electrolyte loss, ketoacidosis, and coma.
Long-term complications include neuropathy, retinopathy, nephropathy, generalized degenerative changes in large and small blood vessels, and increased susceptibility to infection. About 95% of those with DM have Type 2, in which the pancreatic beta cells retain some insulin-producing potential, and the rest have Type 1, in which exogenous insulin is required for long-term survival. In Type 1 DM, which typically causes symptoms before age 25, an autoimmune process is responsible for beta cell destruction. Type 2 DM is characterized by insulin resistance in peripheral tissues as well as a defect in insulin secretion by beta cells. Insulin regulates carbohydrate metabolism by mediating the rapid transport of glucose and amino acids from the circulation into muscle and other tissue cells, by promoting the storage of glucose in liver cells as glycogen, and by inhibiting gluconeogenesis. The normal stimulus for the release of insulin from the pancreas is a rise in the concentration of glucose in circulating blood, which typically occurs within a few minutes after a meal.
When such a rise elicits an appropriate insulin response, so that the blood level of glucose falls again as it is taken into cells, glucose tolerance is said to be normal. The central fact in DM is an impairment of glucose tolerance of such a degree as to threaten or impair health.
Long recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease, DM is often associated with other risk factors, including disorders of lipid metabolism (elevation of very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides and depression of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), obesity, hypertension, and impairment of renal function. Sustained elevation of serum glucose and triglycerides aggravates the biochemical defect inherent in DM by impairing insulin secretion, insulin-mediated glucose uptake by cells, and hepatic regulation of glucose output.
Long-term consequences of the diabetic state include macrovascular complications (premature or accelerated atherosclerosis with resulting coronary, cerebral, and peripheral vascular insufficiency) and microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy).
It is estimated that half those with DM already have some complications when the diagnosis is made. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends screening for DM for people with risk factors such as obesity, age 45 years or older, family history of DM, or history of gestational diabetes. People with impaired glucose tolerance are at higher risk of developing DM within 10 years. For such people, lifestyle modification such as weight reduction and exercise may prevent or postpone the onset of frank DM. Current recommendations for the management of DM emphasize education and individualization of therapy.
Controlled studies have shown that rigorous maintenance of plasma glucose levels as near to normal as possible at all times substantially reduces the incidence and severity of long-term complications, particularly microvascular complications. The ADA recommends inclusion of healthful carbohydrate-containing foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and low-fat milk in a diabetic diet.
Restriction of dietary fat to less than 10% of total calories is recommended for people with diabetes, as for the general population.
Further restriction may be appropriate for those with heart disease or elevated cholesterol or triglyceride levels. The ADA advises that high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets have no particular merit in long-term weight control or in maintenance of a normal plasma glucose level in DM.
Pharmaceutical agents developed during the 1990s improve control of DM by enhancing responsiveness of cells to insulin, counteracting insulin resistance, and reducing postprandial carbohydrate absorption. Tailor-made insulin analogues produced by recombinant DNA technology (for example, lispro, aspart, and glargine insulins) have broadened the range of pharmacologic properties and treatment options available. Their use improves both short-term and long-term control of plasma glucose and is associated with fewer episodes of hypoglycemia. The disease is often familial but may be acquired, as in Cushing's syndrome, as a result of the administration of excessive glucocorticoid.
The various forms of diabetes have been organized into categories developed by the Expert Committee on the Diagnosis and Classification of Diabetes Mellitus of the American Diabetes Association. Type 1 diabetes mellitus in this classification scheme includes patients with diabetes caused by an autoimmune process, dependent on insulin to prevent ketosis.
This group was previously called type I, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, juvenile-onset diabetes, brittle diabetes, or ketosis-prone diabetes. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are those previously designated as having type II, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, maturity-onset diabetes, adult-onset diabetes, ketosis-resistant diabetes, or stable diabetes.
Those with gestational diabetes mellitus are women in whom glucose intolerance develops during pregnancy. Other types of diabetes are associated with a pancreatic disease, hormonal changes, adverse effects of drugs, or genetic or other anomalies.
A fourth subclass, the impaired glucose tolerance group, also called prediabetes, includes persons whose blood glucose levels are abnormal although not sufficiently above the normal range to be diagnosed as having diabetes. Approximately 95% of the 18 million diabetes patients in the United States are classified as type 2, and more than 70% of those patients are obese.
About 1.3 million new cases of diabetes mellitus are diagnosed in the United States each year. See also impaired glucose tolerance, potential abnormality of glucose tolerance, previous abnormality of glucose tolerance.
The results of the United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study, which involved more than 5000 people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes in the United Kingdom, were comparable to those of the DCCT where a relationship in microvascular complications. See ABCD Trial, Brittle diabetes, Bronze diabetes, Chemical diabetes, Gestational diabetes, Insulin-dependent diabetes, Metformin, MODY diabetes, Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, Pseudodiabetes, Secondary diabetes, Starvation diabetes, Troglitazone. DM results either from failure of the pancreas to produce insulin (type 1 DM) or from insulin resistance, with inadequate insulin secretion to sustain normal metabolism (type 2 DM). Either type of DM may damage blood vessels, nerves, kidneys, the retina, and the developing fetus and the placenta during pregnancy. Type 2 DM (formerly called adult-onset DM) has a prevalence in the general population of 6.6%.
In some populations (such as older persons, Native Americans, African Americans, Pacific Islanders, Mexican Americans), it is present in nearly 20% of adults. Type 2 DM primarily affects obese middle-aged people with sedentary lifestyles, whereas type 1 DM usually occurs in children, most of whom are active and thin, although extremely obese children are now being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes as well.
The American Diabetes Association (1-800-DIABETES) estimates that more than 5 million Americans have type 2 DM without knowing it.EtiologyType 1 DM is caused by autoimmune destruction of the insulin-secreting beta cells of the pancreas. The loss of these cells results in nearly complete insulin deficiency; without exogenous insulin, type 1 DM is rapidly fatal. Type 2 DM results partly from a decreased sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin-mediated glucose uptake and partly from a relative decrease in pancreatic insulin secretion.SymptomsClassic symptoms of DM are polyuria, polydipsia, and weight loss. In addition, patients with hyperglycemia often have blurred vision, increased food consumption (polyphagia), and generalized weakness. When a patient with type 1 DM loses metabolic control (such as during infections or periods of noncompliance with therapy), symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis occur.
These may include nausea, vomiting, dizziness on arising, intoxication, delirium, coma, or death. Chronic complications of hyperglycemia include retinopathy and blindness, peripheral and autonomic neuropathies, glomerulosclerosis of the kidneys (with proteinuria, nephrotic syndrome, or end-stage renal failure), coronary and peripheral vascular disease, and reduced resistance to infections.
Patients with DM often also sustain infected ulcerations of the feet, which may result in osteomyelitis and the need for amputation.DiagnosisSeveral tests are helpful in identifying DM.
These include tests of fasting plasma glucose levels, casual (randomly assessed) glucose levels, or glycosylated hemoglobin levels. Intensive therapy consists of three or more doses of insulin injected or administered by infusion pump daily, with frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose levels as well as frequent changes in therapy as a result of contacts with health care professionals. Participation in an intensive therapy program requires a motivated patient, but it can dramatically reduce eye, nerve, and renal complications compared to conventional therapy. Most patients, however, require the addition of some form of oral hypoglycemic drug or insulin. Both types of diabetics also may be prescribed pramlintide (Symlin), a synthetic analog of human amylin, a hormone manufactured in the pancreatic beta cells. When combinations of these agents fail to normalize blood glucose levels, insulin injections are added. Tight glucose control can reduce the patient’s risk of many of the complications of the disease. See: illustrationPrevention of ComplicationsPatients with DM should avoid tobacco, actively manage their serum lipid levels, and keep hypertension under optimal control. Failure to do so may result in a risk of atherosclerosis much higher than that of the general public.
Best made it possible to allow people with the disease to lead normal lives.Patient careThe diabetic patient should learn to recognize symptoms of low blood sugar (such as confusion, sweats, and palpitations) and high blood sugar (such as, polyuria and polydipsia). When either condition results in hospitalization, vital signs, weight, fluid intake, urine output, and caloric intake are accurately documented. Chronic management of DM is also based on periodic measurement of glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c). The effects of diabetes on other body systems (such as cerebrovascular, coronary artery, and peripheral vascular) should be regularly assessed. The urine is checked for microalbumin or overt protein losses, an early indication of nephropathy. The combination of peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease results in changes in the skin and microvasculature that lead to ulcer formation on the feet and lower legs with poor healing. Diabetic patients and their providers should look for changes in sensation to touch and vibration, the integrity of pulses, capillary refill, and the skin.



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Comments

  1. BUTTMEN

    Plan is balanced and offers you all of the diet you the.

    27.11.2015

  2. GOZEL1

    Bad carbohydrate foods, as most everyone does, increases carb.

    27.11.2015

  3. Juan_Gallardo

    Insulin, serum C-peptide, and activities of the glucose metabolizing enzymes hexokinase because it does nothing to address.

    27.11.2015

  4. RANGE_ROVER

    Protein itself is muscle sparing too, which.

    27.11.2015