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Type 2 diabetes: What is it?Diabetes is a chronic condition that affects the body's ability to convert sugar into energy. To provide even greater transparency and choice, we are working on a number of other cookie-related enhancements. The display board for a science project may be the last step before the fair, but don't underestimate its importance! Chemistry Contest--Deadline April 1, 2012  The deadline for the Rosalind Franklin Chemistry Contest is only a few weeks away. This allows sugar levels to build up in the blood, which can lead to heart disease, blindness and other serious complications. It is intended for general information purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. A stunning and scientifically sound project, even one with breakthrough results, needs to be supported by a well-planned and well-designed project display board.
If you have students who worked on food sciences, biotech, or chemistry projects this year, please encourage them to enter.
We would love to hear about their successes and your overall experience using Science Buddies. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health.
We've prepared a handout you can distribute to your classes, make available at the science fair, post to your classroom blog, or hang on a bulletin board at school.
If you used the Topic Selection Wizard with your students or consulted other Science Buddies resources in your class, we would love to hear your story.
Diabetes UK estimates that over 600,000 people with type 2 diabetes don't know they have it.
Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the BootsWebMD Site. Science Buddies project kits make purchasing materials for a Project Idea convenient and easy. With summer just around the corner, parents and students have started mapping out the weeks of summer, hoping to find a balance between free time and educational and enriching camps, programs, and activities. Diabetes may not have symptomsIn most cases type 2 diabetes doesn't cause any symptoms, or the symptoms are mild, which is why many people have it for years without knowing it, and why it's important to get tested. Learn more about recent reports of the connection between arsenic and common foods and fruit juices.
Our Summer Science Camp Resource can help you locate an exciting science program in your area.
Warning sign: ThirstOne of the first symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be an increase in thirst. This is often accompanied by additional problems, including dry mouth, increased appetite, frequent urination – sometimes as often as every hour -- and unusual weight loss or gain. Warning sign: Blurred visionAs blood sugar levels become more abnormal, additional symptoms may include headaches, blurred vision and fatigue. Camp Directors and After-School Program Leaders If you lead a science or engineering summer or after-school program, you are invited to contribute to the MOST-Science project. Warning sign: InfectionsIn most cases, type 2 diabetes is not discovered until it takes a noticeable toll on health.


The nationwide research study is taking a comprehensive look at youth science opportunities that take place outside of school. Diabetes can cause damage to blood vessels and nerve endings in the genitals, leading to a loss of feeling and making orgasm difficult.
Risk factors you can controlYour habits and lifestyle can affect your odds of developing type 2 diabetes. Risk factors for womenHaving gestational diabetes when you're pregnant puts you seven times at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later on. Having a history of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can also cause insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes.
Type 2 diabetes in childrenAlthough older people have a higher risk of getting type 2 diabetes, the condition is affecting more young people. Diabetes UK says around 35,000 children and young people in the UK have diabetes, with around 700 of these having type 2 diabetes. The leading risk factor for children is being overweight, often connected with an unhealthy diet and lack of physical activity.
Once children are overweight, their chances of developing type 2 diabetes more than doubles.
Often a urine test is carried out first, and if it contains glucose, or a person is at risk of diabetes, one or more blood tests to check levels of glucose in the blood are performed. How does insulin work?In healthy people, after a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use the hormone insulin, made in the pancreas, to help them process blood glucose into energy. People develop type 2 diabetes because the cells in the muscles, liver and fat cannot use insulin properly, called insulin resistance. Type 2 Diabetes: Metabolism mishapsIn type 2 diabetes, the cells cannot absorb glucose properly.
If you've developed a condition called insulin resistance, the body makes insulin, but the muscle, liver and fat cells cannot use insulin, or do not respond to the insulin, properly.
With long-standing, uncontrolled type 2 diabetes, the pancreas will reduce the amount of insulin it produces. Managing diabetes: DietFortunately, people with type 2 diabetes can significantly reduce the risk of damage to their bodies, including damage to the heart, kidneys, eyes and feet. People with type 2 diabetes should carefully monitor carbohydrate consumption, as well as total fat and protein intake and reduce calories. Managing diabetes: ExerciseModerate exercise, such as strength training or walking, improves the body's use of insulin and can lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.
Being active also helps reduce body fat, lower blood pressure and protect against heart disease. Try to do at least 150 minutes of exercise a week, with some exercise on most days of the week. It can also increase glucose levels in your blood as part of your "fight or flight" response.
Instead of letting stress take its toll, try relaxation techniques such as deep breathing, meditation or just talking to a friend or relative. Managing diabetes: MedicationWhen people with type 2 diabetes are unable to control blood sugar sufficiently with diet and exercise, medication can help.


There are many types of diabetes medicines available and they are often used in combination.
Some work by stimulating the pancreas to make more insulin, while others improve the effectiveness of insulin, or reduce the liver's production of glucose, or block the digestion of starches. Managing diabetes: InsulinMany people with type 2 diabetes eventually develop 'beta-cell failure'. This means the cells in the pancreas no longer produce insulin in response to high blood sugar levels. In this case, insulin therapy – injections or an insulin pump – must become part of the daily routine. Whereas insulin pulls glucose into the cells, these medications cause the body to release insulin to control blood sugar levels.
Glucose testingTesting your blood glucose level will let you know how controlled your blood sugars are and if you need to take action to change your treatment plan.
How often and when you test will be based on how controlled your diabetes is, the type of therapy used to control your diabetes and whether you are experiencing symptoms of fluctuating sugars. Your diabetes team will suggest how often you should use a glucose meter to check your blood sugar. Common testing times are first thing in the morning, before and after meals and exercise and before bedtime.
Long-term damage: ArteriesOver time, untreated type 2 diabetes can damage many of the body's systems. People with diabetes are likely to develop plaque in their arteries, which reduces blood flow and increases the risk of clots.
People with diabetes are up to five times more likely to develop heart disease or have a stroke.
Long-term damage: KidneysThe longer you have untreated diabetes, the greater the risk of developing kidney disease or kidney failure.
Long-term damage: EyesHigh blood sugar can damage the tiny blood vessels that bring oxygen and nutrients to the retina, a critical part of the eye. This is known as diabetic retinopathy and it can cause progressive, irreversible vision loss. People with diabetes are up to 20 times more likely to go blind than those without diabetes. Long-Term Damage: Nerve PainOver time, uncontrolled diabetes and elevated blood sugars create a very real risk of nerve damage. Symptoms can include tingling, numbness, pain and a pins and needles sensation -- often in the fingers, hands, toes or feet.
Preventing type 2 diabetesOne of the most astonishing things about type 2 diabetes is that such a life-altering condition is often preventable.



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