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According to a recent study, every 8 minutes a child under 6 in the United States gets the wrong medication or the wrong dose of their medication. This entry was posted in Medication Safety and tagged medication safety, Over-the-Counter Medications. Use of prescribed medication during the past 6 months for emotional or behavioral difficulties varied by sex, age, and race and Hispanic origin among children aged 6a€“17 years.
Children insured by Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program were more likely to use prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties than privately insured or uninsured children. Use of prescribed medication during the past 6 months for emotional or behavioral difficulties varied by poverty level. Seven and one-half percent of children aged 6a€“17 years used prescribed medication during the past 6 months for emotional or behavioral difficulties. A higher percentage of children insured by Medicaid or the Children's Health Insurance Program used prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties than children with private health insurance or no health insurance.
A higher percentage of children in families having income below 100% of the poverty level used prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties than children in families at 100% to less than 200% of the poverty level. Among all children aged 6a€“17 years, 7.5% used prescribed medication during the past 6 months for emotional or behavioral difficulties. Among children aged 6a€“17 years, 7.5% used prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties in 2011a€“2012. Emotional or behavioral difficulties: Difficulties with emotions, concentration, behavior, or being able to get along with others. Poverty status or percentage of poverty level: Based on family income, family size, the number of children in the family, and, for families with two or fewer adults, on the age of the adults in the family. Health insurance: Respondents were asked about the sample child's health care coverage at the time of interview. NHIS data were used to estimate the percentage of children who were prescribed medication for emotional and behavioral difficulties during the past 6 months.
NHIS is designed to yield a sample that is representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, and the survey uses weighting to produce national estimates. Differences between percentages were evaluated using two-sided significance tests at the 0.05 level.
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YOU can play a vital role in preventing medication errors, and ConsumerMedSafety.org can provide you the tools to do so! Many parents provide their children supplements such as multivitamins, omega-3 pills and probiotics, thinking the added nutrients can only boost their child’s health. Medication Safety in the HomeEvery 10 minutes in the United States, there’s a child under the age of 6 taken to an emergency department for medication poisoning. Making Sense of Asthma MedicationThe number of children with asthma continues to rise, but the evolution of asthma medication means most attacks can now be prevented before they start. The Dangers of AcetaminophenAcetaminophen is a safe, popular pain reliever and fever reducer, but it can have devastating consequences for children if not taken properly, a CHOC Children’s pharmacist cautions. Medication Safety FAQsTo help keep your little ones safe from common medication mishaps, check out the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about medications, medication safetyprovided by Shannon Bertagnoli, pharmacy safety coordinator at CHOC Children’s. Adults aged 18a€“64 were more than twice as likely as adults aged 65 and over to not have taken medication as prescribed to save money. Among adults aged 18a€“64, uninsured adults were more likely than those with Medicaid or private coverage to use strategies to save money on prescription drugs. Among adults aged 65 and over, asking a doctor for a lower-cost medication to save money varied more by insurance type compared with other strategies.
To save money, adults who were poor or near poor were twice as likely as adults who were not poor to not take medication as prescribed.
Six percent of adults aged 18a€“64 used alternative therapies to save money on prescription drugs compared with 2.3% of adults aged 65 and over. There were no differences by health insurance coverage in the percentages of those who bought prescription drugs from another country to save money.
Previous studies have found that more than 48% of Americans took at least one prescription drug in the past month (6).
Health insurance coverage: NHIS respondents were asked about their health insurance coverage at the time of interview. Poverty status and percentage of poverty level: Based on reported and imputed family income, family size, and the number of children in the family, and, for families with two or fewer adults, on the age of the adults in the family.
NHIS is designed to yield a sample representative of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States, and this analysis used weights to produce national estimates.
These important over the counter medicine safety tips are brought to you today by McNeil Consumer Healthcare. The statistics show that children are performing self administration of medication and this can lead to serious harm. Approximately 10,000 ER visits per year for medicine overdose in individuals younger than 18 are caused by adolescents self-administering OTC medicines. In 2012, poison centers managed over 296,000 exposure cases in children ages 6 to 19; over half of these cases involved medication errors and misuse. In 2012, poison centers reported over 70,000 cases involving medication dosing errors in children 12 and younger. From a young age taking safety precautions need to be taken, such as keeping medicine out of reach and discussing with children that things kept in cabinets can be dangerous them to play with or consume. The Children’s Critical Care Nursing Group focuses on improving nursing care delivery, preventing deterioration and optimising outcomes of the critically ill and deteriorating child in hospital. We work closely with Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust and the Children’s Nursing Research Unit as well as with colleagues in other Paediatric intensive care units in the UK and Europe.
The implementation of a Paediatric Early Warning (PEW) tool within Alder Hey Children's Hospital.
Tume LN, Copnell B (accepted 2014 in press) Endotracheal Suctioning in Critically Ill Children.
Wielenga J, Tume L, Latour J, van den Hoogen A (2014) Establishing neonatal intensive care nursing research priorities in 17 European countries: an e-Delphi Study. Tume L, van den Hoogen A, Wielenga J, Latour J (2014) An electronic Delphi study to establish pediatric intensive care nursing research priorities in 20 European countries. Sefton G, McGrath C, Lane S, Tume L (2014) Impact of using a Paediatric Early Warning system on unplanned admission to the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit; an observational comparison of in-hospital and external admissions.
Tume L and Arnold P (2014) Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) after high risk congenital heart surgery in the PICU. Tume L, Scally A, Carter B (2013) Paediatric intensive care nurses’ and doctors’ perceptions on nurse-led protocol-directed ventilation weaning and extubation. Tume L and Bullock I (2004) The development of early warning tools to identify children at risk of deterioration on ward areas.
An increasing number of neonates and children are surviving critical illness and many have complex healthcare needs.
The summer school is aimed at international early career, doctoral and postdoctoral researchers from both social science and practice based health care. The summer school will be held over two days (Tuesday 26th & Wednesday 27th August) and is structured into keynote lectures, master classes and group sessions.
The summer school is strictly limited to 40 participants and preference will be given to early career, doctoral and postdoctoral researchers from the social sciences and practice-based health care sciences (including allied health care professionals). The summer school involves critical care researchers at the University of Central Lancashire, Dr Lyvonne Tume and Prof Bernie Carter.


She is the chair of the Paediatric Intensive Care Society (PICS) Nursing study group and also the chair if the European Society of Paediatric & Neonatal Intensive Care (ESPNIC) Nurse Science section. The Journal Pediatrics reports that about 44 in 100 pediatric hospital patients suffer from chronic illnesses like cancer, epilepsy, diabetes, and asthma.
The study defined a medical error as an abnormal complication to a specific medical procedure, an adverse reaction to medication, infections and bedsores, making it unclear the severity of the medical mistake that causes these conditions and whether or not they had long-term significant consequences. However, regardless of the limitations of the study, it stands to reason that the probability of a medical error occurring in a person who is chronically ill is going to be higher than someone who is not chronically dealing with a medical condition.
Chronic conditions or not, medical errors are devastating to patients and their families causing emotional, physical, and financial hardships.
Dealing with injury after a medical malpractice has occurred is doubly difficult as not only must you deal with the medical condition that you originally had, but you must then deal with a second medical condition on top of that one. If you or a loved one has suffered injury due to a medical error, don’t delay in contacting a medical malpractice lawyer to learn what your rights are and what compensation you may be eligible for.
This can happen because of confusion about units (how many milliliters are in a teaspoon?) or from using imprecise measuring tools, like a spoon from the silverware drawer instead of a medication measuring cup or oral syringe. This often happens because the caregiver grabs a medication without carefully reading the label to make sure it is the right one. Write down the date and time when you give your child medication, or track it in an app on your smartphone.
Keep a poison center magnet on your refrigerator and store 1-800-222-1222 in your phone so that you can get quick, expert help if a mistake happens. Uninsured children had the lowest percentage of children using prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties compared with children with Medicaid or CHIP, private insurance, or TRICARE or other insurance (Figure 2). The observed differences between children in families having income below 100% of the poverty level and children in families having income at or above 200% of the poverty level were not statistically significant (Figure 3). Males and non-Hispanic white children were more likely to use prescribed medication than females and children of other racial and ethnic groups. The poverty level is based on a set of income thresholds that vary by family size and composition.
Respondents reported whether the child was covered by private health insurance (obtained through the employer or workplace, purchased directly, or purchased through a local or community program), Medicare, Medicaid, CHIP, Indian Health Service (IHS), military insurance (including TRICARE), a state-sponsored health plan, another government program, or any single-service plan. NHIS data are collected continuously throughout the year for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) by interviewers from the U.S. Identifying emotional and behavioral problems in children aged 4a€“17 years: United States, 2001a€“2007. Psychotropic medication treatment of adolescents: Results from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement.
Multiple imputation of family income and personal earnings in the National Health Interview Survey: Methods and examples.
Use of medication prescribed for emotional or behavioral difficulties among children aged 6a€“17 years in the United States, 2011a€“2012. Our dedicated professionals work together to provide the best in pharmaceutical care for the patients and their families who receive care at CHOC Children’s. Better known as Tylenol, acetaminophen is the medication most commonly given to American children. Some adults reduce prescription drug costs by skipping doses and delaying filling prescriptions (2). Poverty categories are based on the ratio of the familya€™s income in the previous calendar year to the appropriate poverty threshold (given the familya€™s size and number of children) defined by the U.S.
Respondents reported whether they were covered by private insurance (obtained through the employer or workplace, purchased directly, or purchased through a local or community program), Medicare, Medigap (supplemental Medicare coverage), Medicaid, Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), Indian Health Service (IHS), military coverage (including VA, TRICARE, or CHAMPa€“VA), a state-sponsored health plan, another government program, or any single-service plan.
Family income was imputed for 22.4% of persons in 2011 using NHIS imputed income files (11). NHIS data are collected continuously throughout the year for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), by interviewers from the U.S.
Medication cost problems among chronically ill adults in the US: Did the financial crisis make a bad situation worse? Despite the recession's effects on incomes and jobs, the share of people with high medical costs was mostly unchanged. The financial burden from prescription drugs has declined recently for the nonelderly, although it is still high for many. Multiple imputation of family income and personal earnings in the National Health Interview Survey: Methods and examples [PDF - 814 KB].
On average, more than 60,000 young children end up in emergency rooms every year because they get into medicines while their parent or caregiver is not looking! Before self administration of medication by children can begin, parents must make sure that kids are old enough and that they have discussed the dangers of over medication. The site also includes a free e-Book, which helps foster an understanding of medicine safety through a fun, illustrated storybook that you can use with your kids to open the medicine safety discussion. Corner stores would be too dangerous, with the constant traffic of cigarette fiends, or crack-heads, and a fast food restaurant wouldn’t be the most convenient place for a boy my age to get a job. Recovering from critical illness can be a long-term process and children and their families face many challenges.
An early career researcher is defined as a person who is currently undertaking or who has held an MSc by research (not taught masters), MRes, MPhil, MD or PhD degree not longer than 5 years.
This includes 2 nights B&B accommodation in university residence, a course dinner on the Tuesday night and refreshments during all breaks.
The application deadline is 2nd June 2014, and if your application is successful, you will be required to pay the full amount by the 1st July 2014. We are also very excited to have Professor Martha Curley (University of Pennsylvania, USA) as our invited distinguished scholar and Professor Jos Latour (Professor in Clinical Nursing, Plymouth University, UK). Bernie is Professor of Children’s Nursing at the University of Central Lancashire and Director of the Children’s Nursing Research Unit (CNRU) at Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation Trust. Her thesis was on the effect of routine nursing interventions (endotracheal suctioning, log-rolling and hygiene interventions) on the intracranial pressure in children with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in intensive care.
She is also a member of the national MCRN study group for cardiology, anaesthesia and critical care. Consequently, these ill children are more likely to xperience an injury due to medical error during the course of treatment than pediatric patients who are treated at hospital for acute conditions. Duration, itself, makes treatment of chronically ill pediatric patients more challenging, with the likelihood of infectious agent exposure being more likely as well. And, regardless of the frequency of pediatric medical errors, doctors and healthcare officials should be held accountable for these lapses in judgment or care.
And, with mounting medical expenses, not to mention possible missed work, filing a medical malpractice lawsuit may make sense to assure that you can take care of yourself or your loved one.
Most children’s medications these days come with an oral syringe or measuring cup for you to use.
Few population-based studies have examined the use of prescription medication to treat mental health problems among younger as well as older school-aged children (8a€“10).
Among females, the percentage of children who used prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties was higher for older females compared with younger females.
Families or individuals with income below their appropriate thresholds are classified as below the poverty level. Point estimates and estimates of corresponding variances for the estimates were calculated using SUDAAN software (15) to account for the complex sample design of NHIS.
The outpatient pharmacy is designed to help meet the medication needs of the patients receiving care from CHOC Children’s, through our clinics, as well as pediatric patients being discharged from the hospital.
That’s right — no more stopping by a pharmacy thanks to the new Med-to-Bed program that improves patient safety and helps prevent hospital re-admissions.


Some cost-reduction strategies used by adults have been associated with negative health outcomes. Adults who do not take prescription medication as prescribed have been shown to have poorer health status and increased emergency room use, hospitalizations, and cardiovascular events (3,4). This information was used to form two health insurance hierarchies: one for those under age 65 and another for those aged 65 and over (10). Point estimates and estimates of corresponding variances for this analysis were calculated using SUDAAN software (13) to account for the complex sample design of NHIS. Clearly, there is need for more medicine safety education and yes, even with over the counter medicine. Eventually, this little old lemonade stand will evolve into a large brand called SHW Lemonade or maybe even a store, but for now I’ll stay simple.
A number of disciplines have an interest in critically ill children and research collaborations across disciplines have the potential to improve health care practices and inform methodological developments.
Applicants must bring a poster presentation of their recent work for discussion (A short 250 word abstract is required at the time of application). She has over 20 years experience in critical care nursing (both adult and paediatric) and continues to practise clinically a day a week. Any time a patient suffers harm at the hands of his or her physician or health care facility due to negligence or inadequate care, a medical malpractice lawsuit may be in order.
This report describes the sociodemographic characteristics of children aged 6a€“17 years prescribed medication or taking medication during the past 6 months for emotional or behavioral difficulties, and describes parental reports of the perceived benefit of this medication. NHIS collects information about the health and health care of the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. All estimates shown in this report have a relative standard error less than or equal to 30%. Many hard to find products, such as injectable drugs, compounded preparations, and special formula are available.
For example, adults who do not take prescription medication as prescribed have been shown to have poorer health status and increased emergency room use, hospitalizations, and cardiovascular events (3,4). This study provides a baseline to track strategies used by adults to reduce their prescription drug costs on a national level for all adults and for subgroups defined by insurance status and poverty level. Gindi are with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health Interview Statistics. So this critical information should open a discussion with your children, especially if you are a parent of kids in grades 5-6 when self administration of the over the counter medicines often begins. For all of you kids out there who want to make money for yourselves, follow the advice of your parents by getting a job, hiring employees, making your own business, and end up with billions and trillions of dollars.
The summer school provides both essential skills and knowledge for methodological and content issues and the opportunity for researchers to collaborate with other researchers in the field. She is Visiting Professor at Edge Hill University and Clinical Professor at the University of Tasmania.
Not only does a medical malpractice suit provide families of these patients with much needed financial assistance, but it holds doctors and medical facilities accountable for medical errors and institutes improvements in the care of patients throughout Canada. The percentage of children who used prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties varied by health insurance status and poverty status. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Mental Health Services, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Mental Health. In addition to prescription products, a limited supply of non-prescription medications are available and medication counseling for patients and families is gladly provided. This report also contributes to the body of literature on the potential burden of prescription drug costs among vulnerable populations including the uninsured and those who are poor (7,8). All estimates shown in this report meet the NCHS standard of reliability (relative standard error less than or equal to 30%). Think twice and use the medicine safety checklist and action plan before you let your child begin self administration of medication! The main thematic area of her research relates to improving the safety of hospitalised children. A higher percentage of children with Medicaid or CHIP coverage used prescribed medication compared with children who had private insurance or were uninsured.
Estimates by poverty status from NHIS are based on both reported and imputed family income (13).
Interviews are conducted in respondents' homes, but follow-ups to complete interviews may be conducted over the telephone. Adults who were poor, near poor, or uninsured were more likely to not take medication as prescribed to reduce their prescription drug costs. A lower percentage of uninsured children used prescribed medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties than either privately or publicly insured children. The Sample Child component collects detailed data on health conditions for a randomly selected child in households with at least one child. Adults aged 65 and over generally were less likely than adults aged 18a€“64 to use strategies to reduce their prescription drug costs. Note that NHIS asks respondents about their personal earnings and family income for the previous calendar year (2010). A higher percentage of children living in poverty used prescribed medication than children in families having income at 100% to less than 200% of the poverty level.
All of the data in the Sample Child component are obtained from a proxy respondent; no information is from medical records. Questions about strategies to reduce prescription drug cost are from the Sample Adult component. There were also differences among children in the parent's perception of the benefit of medication for emotional or behavioral difficulties. A responsible adult, usually a parent, responds to the survey questions as proxy for the sample child. Adults aged 65 and over with Medicare-only coverage were more likely than those with private or those with Medicare and Medicaid coverage to ask their doctor for a lower-cost medication to save money. In 2011, information was collected on a total of 33,014 persons aged 18 and over from the Sample Adult component of the survey. Lack of comment regarding the difference between any two statistics does not necessarily suggest that the difference was tested and found to be not significant. Differences in use of cost-saving strategies were found by insurance status for those aged 18a€“64. Privately insured adults aged 18a€“64 were more likely than those with Medicaid coverage to ask their doctors for a lower-cost medication, however they were less likely than those with Medicaid coverage to not take medication as prescribed. This report focused only on cost-related strategies used by adults to reduce their prescription medication costs.
Over the past 2 decades, the use of medication to treat mental health problems has increased substantially among all school-aged children and in most subgroups of children (5,7,11). There are other barriers to medication adherence including those not related to cost (9) that are not measured in NHIS. Data collected by national health surveys play a key role in monitoring and understanding the factors associated with the expanded use of medication for the emotional and behavioral problems of children.



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