Diabetes type 1 diet chart,s10 2wd lift kit,diabetes type 2 treat - Tips For You

You are here: Home > Are sugar diabetes, sugar sickness and Type 2 diabetes the same thing? Essentially, sugar diabetes or sugar sickness is the same thing as Type 2 diabetes, just by a different name. What’s interesting is that this name obviously came from the false assumption that diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar.
Sweet Life is a South African diabetic community for those who have diabetes, both Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes.
Sign up for our newsletter!Get all the latest news and info from the South African diabetes community, delivered to your inbox - for free! The content of this site is intended as information and is not a substitute for seeking advice from a medical professional. Slideshare uses cookies to improve functionality and performance, and to provide you with relevant advertising. Clipping is a handy way to collect and organize the most important slides from a presentation. BYETTA is indicated as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus [see Clinical Studies (14)].
The concurrent use of BYETTA with prandial insulin has not been studied and cannot be recommended. Based on postmarketing data BYETTA has been associated with acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis. BYETTA should be initiated at 5 mcg administered twice daily (BID) at any time within the 60-minute period before the morning and evening meals (or before the two main meals of the day, approximately 6 hours or more apart). BYETTA is contraindicated in patients with prior severe hypersensitivity reactions to exenatide or to any of the product components.
Based on postmarketing data, BYETTA has been associated with acute pancreatitis, including fatal and non-fatal hemorrhagic or necrotizing pancreatitis.
The risk of hypoglycemia is increased when BYETTA is used in combination with a sulfonylurea. BYETTA should not be used in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance  Use in Specific Populations (8.6)]. There have been postmarketing reports of altered renal function, including increased serum creatinine, renal impairment, worsened chronic renal failure and acute renal failure, sometimes requiring hemodialysis or kidney transplantation.
BYETTA has not been studied in patients with severe gastrointestinal disease, including gastroparesis.
There have been no clinical studies establishing conclusive evidence of macrovascular risk reduction with BYETTA or any other antidiabetic drug. Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.
Table 1 summarizes the incidence and rate of hypoglycemia with BYETTA in six placebo-controlled clinical trials. Antibodies were assessed in 90% of subjects in the 30-week, 24-week, and 16-week studies of BYETTA. In the 16-week trial of BYETTA add-on to thiazolidinediones, with or without metformin, 36 patients (31%) had low titer antibodies to exenatide at 16 weeks. In the 24-week trial of BYETTA used as monotherapy, 40 patients (28%) had low titer antibodies to exenatide at 24 weeks. Antibodies to exenatide were not assessed in the 30-week trial of BYETTA used in combination with insulin glargine. For the 24-week placebo-controlled study of BYETTA used as a monotherapy, Table 2 summarizes adverse reactions (excluding hypoglycemia) occurring with an incidence ?2% and occurring more frequently in BYETTA-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients.


Two of the 155 patients treated with BYETTA withdrew due to adverse reactions of headache and nausea. The most common adverse reactions leading to withdrawal for BYETTA-treated patients were nausea (3% of patients) and vomiting (1%).
For the 16-week placebo-controlled study of BYETTA add-on to a thiazolidinedione, with or without metformin, Table 4 summarizes the adverse reactions (excluding hypoglycemia) with an incidence of ?2% and occurring more frequently in BYETTA-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients.
The most common adverse reactions leading to withdrawal for BYETTA-treated patients were nausea (9%) and vomiting (5%). For the 30-week placebo-controlled study of BYETTA as add-on to insulin glargine with or without oral antihyperglycemic medications, Table 5 summarizes adverse reactions (excluding hypoglycemia) occurring with an incidence ?2% and occurring more frequently in BYETTA-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients.
The following additional adverse reactions have been reported during postapproval use of BYETTA. The effect of BYETTA to slow gastric emptying can reduce the extent and rate of absorption of orally administered drugs.
There are postmarketing reports of increased INR sometimes associated with bleeding, with concomitant use of warfarin and BYETTA [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)]. In developmental toxicity studies, pregnant animals received exenatide subcutaneously during organogenesis. A Pregnancy Registry has been implemented to monitor pregnancy outcomes of women exposed to exenatide during pregnancy. Type 2 diabetes is also sometimes called Diabetes 2 and is often referred to as sugar diabetes.
These days, doctors and scientists have proven that Type 2 diabetes is not linked to how much sugar you eat but is closely linked to your diet, so perhaps the old name wasn’t too far off! Want to do an update on our interview with you for Sweet Life mag, please can you DM me your new email address? BYETTA should not be used for the treatment of type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis, as it would not be effective in these settings. After initiation of BYETTA, and after dose increases, observe patients carefully for signs and symptoms of pancreatitis (including persistent severe abdominal pain, sometimes radiating to the back, which may or may not be accompanied by vomiting). Therefore, patients receiving BYETTA and a sulfonylurea may require a lower dose of the sulfonylurea to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia.
In patients at increased risk of hypoglycemia consider reducing the dose of insulin [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. In patients with end-stage renal disease receiving dialysis, single doses of BYETTA 5 mcg were not well tolerated due to gastrointestinal side effects. Some of these events occurred in patients receiving one or more pharmacologic agents known to affect renal function or hydration status, such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or diuretics. Because BYETTA is commonly associated with gastrointestinal adverse reactions, including nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, the use of BYETTA is not recommended in patients with severe gastrointestinal disease.
Antibody levels were measured in 90% of subjects in the 30-week, 24-week, and 16-week studies of BYETTA. If a hypersensitivity reaction occurs, the patient should discontinue BYETTA and other suspect medications and promptly seek medical advice [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)]. Severe hypoglycemia was defined as an event with symptoms consistent with hypoglycemia requiring the assistance of another person and associated with either a blood glucose value consistent with hypoglycemia or prompt recovery after treatment for hypoglycemia. The level of glycemic control in these patients was generally comparable to that observed in the 69 patients (60%) without antibody titer. The level of glycemic control in these patients was generally comparable to that observed in the 101 patients (70%) without antibody titers.
Because these events are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is generally not possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.


BYETTA should be used with caution in patients receiving oral medications that have narrow therapeutic index or require rapid gastrointestinal absorption [see Adverse Reactions (6.2)]. In animal studies, exenatide caused cleft palate, irregular skeletal ossification and an increased number of neonatal deaths. A diet full of fatty and processed foods (like fast food), refined carbohydrates (like white bread and white rice) and without much wholegrains (like wholewheat bread) and fresh fruit and vegetables can lead to Type 2 diabetes. It is unknown whether patients with a history of pancreatitis are at increased risk for pancreatitis while using BYETTA.
Based on clinical response, the dose of BYETTA can be increased to 10 mcg twice daily after 1 month of therapy.
If pancreatitis is suspected, BYETTA should promptly be discontinued and appropriate management should be initiated. Because BYETTA may induce nausea and vomiting with transient hypovolemia, treatment may worsen renal function.
Some events occurred in patients who had been experiencing nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea, with or without dehydration. In 3%, 4%, and 1% of these patients, respectively, antibody formation was associated with an attenuated glycemic response.
For oral medications that are dependent on threshold concentrations for efficacy, such as contraceptives and antibiotics, patients should be advised to take those drugs at least 1 hour before BYETTA injection.
Once a stable prothrombin time has been documented, prothrombin times can be monitored at the intervals usually recommended for patients on warfarin. BYETTA should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Other antidiabetic therapies should be considered in patients with a history of pancreatitis. Reversibility of altered renal function has been observed in many cases with supportive treatment and discontinuation of potentially causative agents, including BYETTA. If there is worsening glycemic control or failure to achieve targeted glycemic control, alternative antidiabetic therapy should be considered [see Adverse Reactions (6.1)]. Three hundred and sixty patients (38%) had low titer antibodies (Warnings and Precautions (5.5)]. If such drugs are to be administered with food, patients should be advised to take them with a meal or snack when BYETTA is not administered [see Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)]. Each dose should be administered as a subcutaneous (SC) injection in the thigh, abdomen, or upper arm.
Consider antidiabetic therapies other than BYETTA in patients with a history of pancreatitis.
Exenatide has not been found to be directly nephrotoxic in preclinical or clinical studies.
No data are available on the safety or efficacy of intravenous or intramuscular injection of BYETTA. Don't destroy the pads of your major fingers!Leave a Reply Cancel replyReply to comment #0 by Comment Name (required) Email (not shown) (required) Website Pictures of participants through Gravatar.



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Comments

  1. vitos_512

    Report constructive and destructive outcomes you may have quite a lot of insulin.

    25.04.2014

  2. qeroy

    Proven to be very helpful for shedding pounds.

    25.04.2014

  3. ToXuNuLmAz007

    Relief drops for ears, or ask protein.

    25.04.2014