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You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. This Gerber Bear Grylls Ultimate Knife has a fine edge from the tip of the blade to the top of the handle. Well I’m pretty jazzed to get this review of the NEW Gerber Bear Grylls Ultimate PRO Survival Knife out to you after a few weeks of research, use and testing. Now the big, huge difference between these knives is the full tang construction of the Ultimate PRO knife vs. Full tang construction is regarded by most experts as the strongest, most durable way to make a knife.
The Ultimate PRO has a drop point blade… which simply means that the spine side of the blade curves down until it meets the tip of the blade. Drop point blades are common for survival and general purpose utility knifes because they make for a strong tip and tough knife across the entire surface of the blade.
Serrations are great for cutting things like rope… and extending the usefulness of your knife long after the fine edge is quite dull.
But a serrated edge can get in the way of many bushcraft tasks and make fine slicing, cutting or skinning difficult. My knife came quite sharp enough out of the box to shave hair off of the back of my hand and slice a long thin piece of plastic off of a ball point pen body… similar to the performance of a razor blade.
In my testing I was surprised at how well this edge held up while performing many tasks and after some knife throwing and a bunch of drops on rocks and frozen soil.
On the spine side there is a notched out, coating-free striker area for use as the fire steel striker. But this choil’s true purpose is to allow the blade to be sharpened all the way to the end of the edge without interference of the handle or hand guard.
The Ultimate PRO Knife comes with a newly designed emergency whistle that seems more durable than the previous one is quite loud and comes attached to the knife with it’s integrated lanyard. I can confidently say… you should not have any issues with THIS pommel or tang even in hard-use situations.
The handle is made up of the knife tang and what seem to be two rugged polymer slabs that are secured to the knife using these 4 star or torque bolts and two permanent metal insets that are inside the two lashing holes at the top of the grip.
Most of the polymer handle is covered over with what feels like the same, rubberized grippy material that’s used on just about every other knife and tool in this line. The only noticeable difference between this knife and the original version is the weight of the knife… which doesn’t feel heavy, but actually makes the knife feel a bit more substantial. The knife balances well with the center of gravity in the area of the the forefinger handle cutout. Now in addition to the lanyard hole, we have two additional holes on the hand guard that go through the handle slabs and tang that are strategically placed to help you lash this knife onto a pole to make a spear.
The lashing holes also serve another important task as part of the friction lock system that holds the knife in its sheath. And like the previous version of this knife, we have a handle strap with a Velcro-like closure system to keep the knife tight against the sheath when not in use. The sheath is designed for left or right-hand carry and has a hole in the bottom of the knife compartment to allow water to drain through if you go for a swim or end up out in a storm with this knife. On the back of the ballistic nylon upper part of this sheath there is a nylon vertical belt loop that should work well with belts up to 2 inches wide. Next, let’s look at the carbide bladed pull-through sharpener, which is a better field sharpening solution than the diamond stone sharpener that is on the Original Ultimate Knife sheath… simply because sharpening your knife with this sharpener is easy for anyone, regardless of skill level. The cool thing about this pull sharpener, is that it’s designed to perfectly sharpen the entire fine edge of this knife because of the spacing the choil provides between the hand guard and the edge.
For some tips on using the sharpener for your knife, and a full demonstration, check out my full review on YouTube by searching, “Bear Grylls Ultimate Pro Knife Review”.
Last but not least, on the front of this sheath you will find a cleverly stored ferro rod, which is positioned right side up… instead of upside down (like on the Original version). This change alone should about ensure that your ferro rod doesn’t accidentally fall out of the sheath and get lost in the wilderness, which COULD happen in the previous version of this sheath. The ferrocerium used in this rod seems to be pretty high quality, so starting a fire with it was really easy.
WE TOOK OFF A FULL STAR because to make all of these upgrades, the street price of the knife went from sub $40 US up to around $70 US. And honestly, in the competitive category for survival knives… a 4 out of 5 star rating is pretty darn good.
SO if you like your current Bear Grylls Utimate Survival Knife… You’re gonna LOVE the NEW Ultimate PRO!!! With its steel upgrade, full tang construction and all the goodies that come with it… this knife is a great choice for those who are ready to upgrade from the Original Bear Grylls Survival Knife.
Do a review on the bear grylls parang it’s confusing that they have new and old parangs and some are recalled some are not and if its worth getting for the price. The new knife off gerber is $105.00 US you said it would be realeased of gerber for $70.00 US is their something that brought the price up?
Let’s just say if a person was to choose between Gerber LMF II & this knife, which knife would you prefer? I can’t find it in Vancouver, I can only find the other Gerber survival knives, anyone can tell me where to get it? As you commented re, I was disappointed that Gerber removed the molle loops from the sheath for this knife. My bottom line: I DO recommend this knife so long as the buyer is aware of its cosmetic issues and the lack of molles. Can you please elaborate bacause I think I’m lost with your explaination on why you removed a full star on its rating. And my comment on the color and design of the handle, I think the reason why they made it to have such bright colors as orange was because in a survival situation (unless you’re in combat and behind enemy lines) you want to be seen right? Possibly the best blade to date in the Gerber Bear Grylls Survival Series line, is the early 2013 release – Bear Grylls Paracord Fixed Blade knife. This blade is one solid piece of good quality, gray coated, stainless steel from tip to butt.
The Paracord knife comes with this versatile, kydex-like sheath about 45 inches of orange paracord for the handle, and the Bear Grylls Priorities of Survival Pocket Guide. A clip point blade has the spine side of the blade “clipped” off to form a tip that is sharper and more suitable for piercing than most drop point blades, and is strong yet still great for tasks that require more cutting accuracy and precision.
See the difference between the Bear Grylls Paracord knife clip point and the Bear Grylls Folding sheath knife’s drop point? The blade of this knife came very sharp and is easy to touch up with the Bear Grylls field sharpener.
Between the edge and the parpacord handle we have a finger cutout that should help to keep your hand from slipping onto the blade – this area is also call the choil of the knife. The Bear Grylls Paracord knife is very similar to the Bear Grylls compact fixed blade knife… with the big differences being the fine vs. This handle of the Bear Grylls Paracord knife has 5 holes and two large cutouts that enable the primary task of wrapping about 4 feet of paracord through and around them to form the handle of the knife. Bear Grylls Paracord Survival Knife has 5 Holes and 2 Cutouts to Weave to Weave the Paracord through to Make the Handle. And then used the holes and cutouts to lash the entire length of the paracord to secure this knife to my pole.
The knife lashes best to a pole that is slightly smaller in diameter than the width of the handle. The lengh the stock paracord was a perfect for locking the knife onto my pole… and should be completely reusable as the knife handle as long as you don’t cut it when using it for other things.
Now, it’s also easy to replace the stock paracord with whatever color and length you prefer. I like my knives to be a little less conspicuous, so I replaced the paracord with good old OD Green I guess this lets the cat out of the bag on the vintage of my Marine Corps days.
Alright… so, I got two extra wraps around the handle by pulling my mill spec paracord really tight as I wove it around my knife. However, Gerber completely redesigned the sheath of the Gerber Bear Grylls Paracord knife so these problems no longer exist.
The Bear Grylls Paracord knife goes into the sheath only one way and locks firmly into the sheath.
The top 4 grommets are strategically positioned so this polymer belt loop in the rear can be removed and repositioned using two hex bolts for: side draw, regular, upside down AND for either left or right hand carry.
If you’d prefer not to have the Bear Grylls logo showing when you wear the Paracord knife… you can also attach the belt carry loop to the front side of the sheath, so that the Bear Grylls logo covered by the belt carry loop and facing in. Now replace the stock orange paracord with the paracord color of your choice and you have an excellent, versatile paracord knife package that has the look you want for your gear.


Oh, one last thing with this knife and sheath package… So whether intentional or not, the Bear Grylls pocket survival guide fits snug and perfectly between the belt loop assembly and the  sheath… see?
The pocket survival guide tucks perfectly between the belt carry loop and the knife sheath. For extra security… make sure that you attach the belt loop so that the bolts are below the pocket guide, which should further prevent the guide from falling out. Owner comments are very positive sighting the surprising quality, good edge holding characteristics and the excellent design of the Bear Grylls Paracord knife and sheath.
Others mentioned how quickly the bright orange paracord gets soiled… But most seem to agree that this is a knife worth having. We rate the Bear Grylls Paracord Fixed Blade Knife at 5 out of 5 stars for it’s well thought out design from tip to butt.
Although we also thought the sheath was a bit of overkill at first… we now appreciate it’s ability to safely hold the knife and carried in many different ways. I admit, I also like that I can cover over the Bear Grylls logo and I have always like it when Gerber incorporates a way for the Survival Guide to be carried along. If you want a comparable fixed blade knife with a solid handle, check out my review of the Bear Grylls Compact Fixed Blade Knife.
If you would like a similarly sized folding knife check out my reviews of the Bear Grylls folding sheath or Bear Grylls Scout knife. For your convenience I’ve included links to all of the gear that I’ve mentioned, in throughout this review. So… don’t forget to Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for our latest tips and video reviews.
While you’re here, don’t forget to Subscribe to our Monthly Survival e-MAG, Like Us on Facebook, Follow Us on Twitter and get the latest news and be the first to hear about the great gear giveaway contests we have planned. Just wondering one thing : are the knife and sheath solid enough together to be used as a shovel ? Mitchhells – geared for adventure store at chadstone in melbourne has the entire bear grylls range. Just arrived, it’s everything you described, can easily see it being used as an edc (depending on what I’m doing that day)! It’s a friction-lock system – you just push it into the sheath and it snaps in place and then you just pull it out and it comes out! Hey David just wondering if you could do a review on the gerber bear grylls parang and compact parang. As David pointed out, replacing the orange cord with a darker color was the first thing I did as well.
Since its release, the excitement surrounding the Bear Grylls Ultimate Knife has been overwhelming. Well, a few months ago one of our subscribers contacted me and said that he found the “real” Ultimate Survival Knife and encouraged me to review the Schrade Extreme Survival knife.
As I took the survival knife out of it’s sheath, my first impression was a mix of surprise and disbelief. Honestly, I just wanted to hang it from my belt, strap it on my leg and go play in the woods.
I’ve been checking this knife out now for several weeks and my initial enthusiasm has not changed. So, the Schrade Extreme Survival (SCHF9) was designed for Schrade by Griffin Design and is a fixed blade knife that has a fine edge, which means there are no serrations on this blade. The SCHF9 is one of three primary designs from the Schrade Extreme Survival line up of knives.
And the intriguing, military-styled, SCHF2 which is made of a solid piece of steel, including a waterproof barrel handle that can hold a nice bit of survival gear. The blade of this Schrade Extreme Survival knife is full tang construction which means the blade steel runs the entire length of the knife, from tip to butt, and is considered the strongest knife construction technique by experts.
Now 1095 is not stainless, so you’ll want to wipe the blade edge with mineral oil now and again to prevent oxydation. The entire blade is covered in a very durable, almost gun metal gray, anti reflective coating that’s designed to protect the blade from corrosion.
This knife blade is a beast at a quarter inch wide… which made me not at all shy to twist and turn this survival knife while it was well sunk into logs in my bushcraft tests. You can usually tell a drop point blade because spine of the blade drops slightly toward the point.
Drop point blades make for really strong blade tips and are great for multipurpose survival knife blades, like this one. Okay… now look at the knife edge profile… See how the blade widens just before it curves up to make the tip?
I’m not sure what the intent was here… but the slight concave edge curve toward the handle seems to make carving sticks and bark skinning a little easier. And the geometry of this knife, combined with it’s mass, and the deep flat grind of the edge, seems to provide a bit more power when chopping than any of the other knives we’ve tested so far.
Now of course a knife is never going to replace a hatchet or an axe… but it’s nice to know that if you only have this knife with you in the field, you can cut and split wood quite nicely. But a point like this is not going to be as good for tactical and combat functions such as piercing… which is something knives like the SOG Seal Team Elite are designed for. At the bottom of the blade steel, toward the handle, we have a concave cutout for the forefinger. Here I am using the SOG combo fire steel and sharpening tool, and this knife to start a little blaze. The Schrade Extreme Survival knife has one TPE handle grip on each side of the knife steel. In the case of this handle, it’s both tough and resistant to wear while being very grippy, comfortable and shock absorbent. This handle’s grip is enhanced even more through the use of a raised pattern of concentric circles, which makes it very grippy, even when it’s soaked.
This is a hefty and meaty handle that widens to nearly an inch and a quarter to fit nicely in my palm, and it narrow toward the front and back, to fit very naturally, as I wrap my hand around it. There are 5 notches in the blade-steel-spine side of the handle, toward the blade, that provide some additional grip for my thumb. Now on the bottom of this handle, there are 3 generous finger cutouts, that keep my hand firmly locked onto the knife.
This is one knife that those with small, medium AND large hands should all find comfortable to use, even for extended periods, due to the excellent forethought that was put into it’s design. At the butt end of the Extreme Survival, the handle flairs and curves, so you can wrap your thumb and forefinger firmly around the very bottom of the handle, for chopping and splitting. The Schrade Extreme Survival knife is well balanced, with the center of gravity right about where my forefinger naturally wraps around the handle. Now I know that several of you guys have told me that you would never throw your survival knife. So I can’t resist taking the Extreme Survival out to the knife range and giving it a few tosses. This knife throws quite well considering it’s size and mass, which really cause it to sink into the wood. The Schrade Extreme Survival knife sheath, has a tactical look and is made out of a good quality black nylon that is double stitched in most places… which is good. The plastic liner is designed for the knife to be placed in the sheath for right hand carry. The knife secures in the sheath, through the use of this adjustable strap, with a snap, closure system. The sheath easily straps to just about any belt, up to about 2 inches wide, and uses a flip and tuck belt strap system, to attach to your belt, without taking it off. And this pouch and sheath strap system, also give this sheath the ability to attach to a MOLLE vest or pack.
This little pouch also has a loop on it’s back, to enable belt carry… which is a cool option. Being naturally curious, I wondered how much survival gear I could fit in this sheath pouch, to round out this knife, and make it an even more helpful survival system. So, I knew I wanted a knife sharpener, fire steel and a small LED light and maybe a multi-tool. For links to all of the gear that I stuffed into this pouch, see the video description on YouTube. Owners tend to really love this knife, and go on and on about the Schrade Extreme Survival knife being a sharp, heavy duty, work horse of a knife, and usually average well over 4 out of 5 stars.
Some comment on the blade edge not being perfect and some minor imperfections here and there, where the handle grip meets the blade steel.


We rate the Schrade Extreme Survival knife at a very rare 5 out of 5 stars for it’s design, fit-and-finish, heavy-duty build, tough, edge holding blade, comfortable handle, versatile sheath, it’s usefulness in the field, and we were pushed over the edge by it’s crazy low ONLINE street price, of under $45. The Schrade Extreme Survival knife is an excellent tool for camping, hunting, backpacking, bushcraft, extreme adventures, safaris, bug-out-bags and emergency kits. If you want a knife for diving or outdoor activities like canoe camping where there is a good change that your knife is going to be wet for extended periods of time… look elsewhere. Although the 1095 high carbon steel that used in the knife can be maintained in wet situations, you may want the luxury of a knife that is made of a quality stainless steel.
Or, if you really like this knife design, and the price point, check out the Schrade Extreme Survival SCHF3, since it’s very similar in design to the SCHF9 and IS made out stainless steel. If you want a survival knife with the added cutting power of serrations, you might want to check out the Schrade Extreme Survival SCHF3 or the SCHF2 which both come in fine and partially serrated versions.
If you want a more tactical or combat survival knife, check out the my reviews of the Gerber LMF II, the SOG Seal Team Elite, the Cold Steel SRK, the Schrade SCHF2, the Gerber Prodigy or the Gerber LHR. For your convenience I’ve included links to the Schrade Extreme Survival knife and all of the other knives and gear that I’ve mentioned, throughout this review. I really like the idea of putting the survival gear in the pouch of the sheath and I was wondering if I could get the sheath separate from the knife any where.
One more thing, you should really review ka-bar usmc knife, if it can be a good survival knife that is. I recently found the Schrade extreme survival Sch2sm and was wanting if you could give me some advice on gear I could put in the handle for s mini survival kit. David- would you recommend the schf9 or the schf10 for a bug out bag, hiking, camping, and other outdoor uses like chopping? 1 – Should I get the SCHF9 or will the CS Leatherneck Tanto be sufficient for heavy outdoor use like the SCHF9? Pivot's Demise: Death By Skinny Bundle, Millennials Fleeing TV Or No Must-See Programming?
In the case of blank firing guns and airguns the customs of your country will require you an import license(Controlled by the National Police Agency, Ministry of the Interior).
This site uses own cookies and third-party cookies to collect statistical information about navigation and show you preferences related advertising, generated from their navigation patterns. So today I’ll dig in and look at this knife from just about every angle and see if this knife is garbage, good or anywhere close to great. This knife’s choil has enough space for my forefinger to wrap around for better leverage and control in fine cutting and slicing. These holes perfectly align with 4 raised bumps (two on each side) toward the top of sheath that work together to firmly lock the knife in the sheath when it’s not in use. It’s a great choice for camping, backpacking, hiking, bug-out bags, emergency kits, responsible scouts, for bushcraft or as very nice general utility knife around the home or shop to use every day or have handy just in case.
I am wondering if it is possible to remove the plastic knife handle off the Gerber Bear Grylls Ultimate Pro Survival knife without breaking it and leave it bare metal, (no pun inteneded but still funny) so i can wrap paracord around the handle and still put the plastic handle back on after taking the paracord off, without having to get another knife.
All your videos have helped me and my little brother become more educated in survival techniques. Then I ran about 6 inches of extra cord out the butt-end and tied it off to make a nice laynard. Since the metal is exposed on the butt end this knife, you can use it as a pommel to break and smash things. Some mention how goofy they thought the sheath initially was but how it all made sense when they got to using the knife. We love the full tang construction and the well thought out placement of the handle cut outs for the paracord and the added versatility of being able to easily and firmly lash this knife to a pole to make a spear.
I clamped it down and wrestled it out when mine got stuck, but BE CAREFUL, the blade is sharp and it cuts skin easily( I found out the hard way).
I have the compact survival knife and have also noticed how it is not very secure in the upside down carry and that is how I would like to carry it.
I want to replace the paracord but I don’t want to get it off and not be able to get it on very well. I received this product today, I noticed that this product came in a rectangle card board box, rather than in the usual plastic blister packs. I smiled and just waved the knife around in my hand for a while trying to figure out how in the world Schrade was able to put together such a formidable survival knife package for such a crazy low online street price.
1095 steel is a favorite of many knife lovers because it’s not too expensive, it’s pretty tough and it holds an edge very well. Mineral oil works great because it’s cheap, easy to get and safe if you want to chop up some food with your knife.
The grind is what makes a knife sharp… It’s the angle cut of the steel on both sides of the blade that meet to form the edge of the blade. And this edge has a deep flat grind, which means the ground surface on each side of the blade is a bit deeper (or longer) than normal which makes this edge similar to one you would find on a hatchet.
This stout point design almost ensures that your tip is not going to bust even if you have to pry or dig with it. In a life and death situation, and hopefully with a backup knife on me, I would not hesitate to throw this knife if I needed to. Many even say that they bought two of these knives for the price they would have paid for just one knife before they found the Extreme Survival.
But the blade, strength, edge holding ability, tough, protective coating, design, fit and finish, and everything else for the price, is so amazing, we were compelled to give this knife 5 out of 5 stars.
I was wondering if the Schrade SCHF3 was also a quarter inch thick, I was considering purchasing it but was hoping to see your review first.
And could you as well as that do a review on this knife but the sm not normal seized knife.
I wouldn’t really be getting wet so the type of metal on the schf9 would not be a problem. That being said, if you prefer a bit larger and heavier knife, and you’d like a rubberized grip, go with the SCHF-9.
Wild host will headline and co-produce extreme adventure competition series Get Out Alive with Electus via his Bear Grylls Ventures. While much more understated, Les Stroud’s Surivorman is realistic and compelling for that reason. The Hollywood Sign is a trademark and intellectual property of Hollywood Chamber of Commerce. Does this means that this knife cannot compare or can not be on par with these ‘heavy-hitters’?
Great idea just wish the quality was better and possibly some straps so you could attach it to your leg. 1095 steel also sharpens to an edge that is great for all around cutting, slicing and chopping.
A flat grind simply means that both ground surfaces of the blade edge are flat opposed to being concave or convex.
And have you considered buying Leatherman and reviewing them because I know that you have a Leatherman wave. I have heard about the Gerber Bear Grylls Paracod Fixed Blade Knife, but i want to know about this one, thank you in advance and have a great day.
In the package was the knife, sheath with reversible clip and priorities of survival guide. Gerber now makes the Bear Grylls Ultimate Knife with a fine-edge from the top of the handle to the tip of the blade. The Seal Team Elite is a tactical, combat and fighting knife first and a capable survival tool after this. Thus, the choice came down to either schrade or ka bar (thanks to all the knife reviews by David).
Housed in a nylon and hard rubber military-grade sheath, a diamond-coated knife sharpener, emergency whistle, fire starter and survival guide are all integrated. Also, removing the handle slabs with eliminate your ability to use the knife sheath since the handles hold the knife in the sheath via friction. Grylls initials, I made short work of the orange with some Krylon ultra-flat back camo paint intended for plastyic surfaces.




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