A catastrophic, prolonged failure of the electrical grid—the sort of event whose effects are  depicted in National Geographic Channel’s upcoming American Blackout, which premieres Sunday—may seem like just apocalyptic science fiction to some viewers.  Unfortunately, though, the possibility of such a breakdown is all too real. The scenario envisioned by GridEx II is a particularly scary one, in which terrorists or an enemy country stages a combination of cyber attacks and physical attacks that destroy or render inoperable crucial power facilities and take down large sections of the grid. If hackers managed to penetrate utility companies’ electronic defenses, they might be able to give instructions to key pieces of equipment that would cause them to fail. No wonder that former federal counterterrorism advisor Richard Clarke has warned that such an “electronic Pearl Harbor” could cause devastating damage and thousands of deaths across the nation. Grid failure:   There’s also the possibility that the grid simply could break down on its own. More than 50 million people throughout the Northeast lost power in the great blackout of 2003.
The White House report recommends strengthening parts of the grid against extreme weather — transformers, for example, shouldn’t be close to sea level. The best bet would be a more distributed grid, with more local generation — chiefly via solar panels — and local storage. In a 2006 study, researchers at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory demonstrated that an attacker could instruct an electrical generator’s turbine to spin wildly out of control until smoke began pouring out, as this video illustrates. A 2012 National Academy of Sciences report concurred, envisioning that attackers using a combination of hacking and physical sabotage could cripple the U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz said the Energy Department had recently created a new internal cyber council, spanning four offices. As a result, a powerful electrical current would radiate down to the Earth and create additional currents that would course through manmade electrical circuits as well. A solar storm, which would spew a surge of radiation across the 93million-mile distance between the Sun and our Earth, causing an electromagnetic pulse similar to the one that a high-altitude nuclear blast would trigger–except that it might be even bigger, and have even more devastating effects.
I’ve been off the grid for quite some time so I barely understand computers, programs, video game systems, heck I barely understand my phone. From structures such as the golden gate bridge, the Eiffel Tower, The Hoover Dam, heck even probably every bridge, fence, monument, pretty much any hi-rise building, you name it, Placing externally simply chicken wire and if wished solar paneling and any type of plant from berries, honey suckles, herbs, roses, ivies even stalky, bushy plants, also like berries, nuts, olives, hemp, even vegetables, like beans tomatoes, cucumbers and of course grapes. As Mike Jacobs, a senior analyst at the Union of Concerned Scientists, notes in a blog post, the No. Unsurprisingly, diesel-powered generators proved popular in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, and solar panels helped as well.


While we’ve known the destructive effects of solar weather on Earth’s electrical infrastructure since the 19th century, the first really clear-cut warning came in 1989, when a moderate-intensity solar storm caused northeastern Canada’s Hydro-Quebec power grid to fail, leaving millions of people without electricity for nine hours.
Heck, with this movie could theorize man-kind could have inhabited and been wiped out and reborn again over 100 times in our planets lifetime without even knowing it, but I have also theorized with this same movie the civilizations that lasted the longest co-existed with nature not to remove it. Second, the employment of farmers and other specialists in altering plant growth so that everything grows up the vines consistently.
1 lesson from the blackout was simple: make grid-reliability rules mandatory, not just voluntary, as was the case before.
We saw that after last year’s Hurricane Sandy, which knocked out power for millions of people, many of them for weeks, as utilities struggled to repair downed power lines and flooded equipment. Burying overhead utility wires can cost between $500,000 to $2 million per mile, and those underground wires may end up even more vulnerable to storm-surge flooding close to the coast. Of course, generators are dependent on fuel, and the widespread power outages after Sandy also shut down the Northeast’s fuel-distribution network too.
Study Shows False Memories Afflict Us AllCritters So Ugly They Have to Mate With ThemselvesIn Town vs. Yousef Butt, a scientist at Center for Astrophysics at Harvard University, argued in a 2010 article in the online journal Space Review that the likelihood of a devastating EMP from a solar storm is greater than that from an intentional EMP attack. Upon watching above said movie, Life After People, I have hypothesized a solution to the problems we are all doing completely wrong. More important, the disaster underscored just how rickety our interconnected and jury-rigged electrical grid was — and how vulnerable it could be to disruption, both accidental and malevolent. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) now has the ability to impose fines of up to $1 million per violation per day for failure to comply with those standards. FERC notes that high-voltage transmission lines have been available for normal use 99.6% of the time over the past three years, not including planned outages. In its report, the White House estimates that weather-related power outages have cost the U.S. But better batteries in the future could offer utilities, business and residences the chance to store electricity for a (very) rainy day, while cheaper solar will give individuals more independence and create a grid that’s more resilient in the event of a prolonged disruption.
A 2008 Congressional Research Service report predicted that an attack on the Washington DC-Baltimore region that only damaged 10 percent of communications systems and the electrical grid and 20 percent of electronic devices would still require a month of recovery time and inflict as much as $34 billion in economic losses. Fourth, finally over a period of time, less than a decade probably, more layering of chicken wire, the external structure will begins to reinforce and expand around the structures.


But building more transmission wires and energy-storage units would help in the event of another major storm. As power lines became overloaded, they began sagging because of the high temperatures, until one line south of Cleveland touched an overgrown tree limb and short-circuited. In an analysis conducted for the Associated Press, the software and data service firm Ventyx found that utilities spent an average of $21,514 per year on devices and station equipment per mile of transmission line from 2003 to 2012 — nearly three times what they spent from 1994 to 2003.
Compared with just about anything else offered by business or the government — 911 response times, air travel, voting lines — the grid has been something Americans can count on. You’re in a situation where it’s more likely that the next failure is going to happen because the last failure already happened.
You’ll see monuments, like the Washington Monument growing into a pyramid not unlike the Egyptians.
With climate change likely making storms stronger and potentially more frequent — even as we crowd into coastal areas and become more dependent on constant electricity — the vulnerability of the grid will only increase.
That’s the idea of cascading failure…Everything in the power system is protected so it doesn’t fry when something goes wrong.
The top of the structure being what’s left of monument and the bottom where the vine growth is allowed to grow outward as well as upward, 10, 20, 30 years into the future will become a leafy, mound of earth. Thanks in part to $4.5 billion in federal stimulus money allocated toward the construction of a smart grid, utilities have been able to add hundreds of advanced grid sensors and millions of smart electrical meters, which help power companies keep near real-time tabs on the state of the grid. The same could be said true about oil rigs, railroad tracks, I believe even hi-rise buildings could all be altered and modified by using our earth to co-exist with our earth to remain on our earth, and to save our earth. And it doesn’t hurt that power demand has remained flat or fallen over the past decade, as devices and appliances became more efficient and economic growth slowed down.
At the time it was the second most widespread power blackout in history, after a 1999 disaster in Brazil.



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