The development and employment of a SEMP is an important complement to such existing plans, because it promotes an integrated and coordinated approach to emergency management planning within federal institutions and across the federal government.
The Emergency Management Planning Guide uses a step-by-step approach and provides instructions that are supplemented by the Blueprint and the Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) template provided in Annexes A and B, respectively. The Emergency Management Planning Unit, Public Safety Canada, is responsible for producing, revising and updating this Guide. Given this variety of EM planning documents, the distinctions between them are summarized in the following table. The National Strategy and Action Plan for Critical Infrastructure establishes a public-private sector approach to managing risks, responding effectively to disruptions, and recovering swiftly when incidents occur.
This step involves starting the formal planning process in recognition of the responsibility to prepare a SEMP. Consider including a member of your institution's corporate planning area on the EM planning team in order to help align the EM planning cycle with the institution's overall business planning cycle. Federal government institutions should consider identifying the range of experience and skill sets required in the EM planning team. Additional supporting planning tools and templates as well as an EM glossary are provided in Annexes C and D, respectively.
The Planning Context is represented in a target diagram that consists of three circles representing the factors federal institutions should consider in order to understand the context in which it operates and how it could potentially be affected.
Adopting the current Treasury Board Policy related to material and asset management and coding criteria will help structure an effective approach. As an example of Business Continuity Plan Sample this plan of action signifies the actual organization dedication in order to reaction, resumption, recuperation, as well as repair preparing. Learn how to develop disaster recovery strategies as well as how to write a disaster recovery plan with these step-by-step instructions.
In addition to using the strategies previously developed, IT disaster recovery plans should form part of an incident response process that addresses the initial stages of the incident and the steps to be taken.
Important: Best-in-class DR plans should begin with a few pages that summarise key action steps (such as where to assemble employees if forced to evacuate the building) and lists of key contacts and their contact information for ease of authorising and launching the plan.
The Guide includes a Blueprint (see Annex A), a Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) template (see Annex B), and supporting step-by-step instructions, tools and tips to develop and maintain a comprehensive SEMP—an overarching plan that establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure, which generally sets out how the institution will assist with coordinated federal emergency management, including response. As such, federal institutions are to base EM plans on mandate-specific all-hazards risk assessments, as well as put in place institutional structures to provide governance for EM activities and align them with government-wide EM governance structures.
It should integrate and coordinate elements identified in operational plans and business continuity plans (BCPs). The SEMP should be central to the federal government institution's EM activities and provide clear linkages for integrating and coordinating all other intra-departmental and inter-departmental emergency management plans. These treatment options, forming recommendations, would be used to develop the risk treatment step in the risk management or emergency management cycle. This process can be seen as a timeline, such as in Figure 2, in which incident response actions precede disaster recovery actions. The next section should define roles and responsibilities of DR recovery team members, their contact details, spending limits (for example, if equipment has to be purchased) and the limits of their authority in a disaster situation. During the incident response process, we typically become aware of an out-of-normal situation (such as being alerted by various system-level alarms), quickly assess the situation (and any damage) to make an early determination of its severity, attempt to contain the incident and bring it under control, and notify management and other key stakeholders.
Located at the end of the plan, these can include systems inventories, application inventories, network asset inventories, contracts and service-level agreements, supplier contact data, and any additional documentation that will facilitate recovery. These are essential in that they ensure employees are fully aware of DR plans and their responsibilities in a disaster, and DR team members have been trained in their roles and responsibilities as defined in the plans.
It does not lay out the requirements for preparing related EM protocols, processes, and standard operating procedures (SOP) internal to the institution; however, these should be developed in support of the SEMP and related plans. And since DR planning generates a significant amount of documentation, records management (and change management) activities should also be initiated. EM planning, in particular, aims to strengthen resiliency by promoting an integrated and comprehensive approach that includes the four pillars of EM: prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. In addition, there are other existing EM planning documents and initiatives that apply to a range of federal government institutions, such as the Federal Emergency Response Plan (FERP) and deliverables under the National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure. The aim is to develop a SEMP that integrates and coordinates elements identified in hazard-specific plans and BCPs.
Federal government institutions in the early stages of developing a SEMP may find it useful to read the material in Sections One and Two, while other institutions with more established plans may wish to proceed directly to Section Three. Supporting templates and tools can contribute to effective emergency management planning and are provided with this Guide. The purpose of this Guide is to assist federal officials, managers and coordinators responsible for emergency management (EM) planning. The EM plans of federal government institutions should address the risks to critical infrastructure within or related to the institution's areas of responsibility, as well as the measures for protecting this infrastructure. The SEMP is the overarching plan that provides a comprehensive and coordinated approach to EM activities.
Operational plans may be based on all four pillars of EM planning, or focus on the specific activities of a single pillar.
Emergency management (EM) refers to the management of emergencies concerning all hazards, including all activities and risk management measures related to prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. The Emergency Management Continuum is depicted in a wheel diagram where all four risk-based functions of emergency management are interconnected and interdependent in a system from prevention and mitigation to preparedness, response, and recovery.


In the center of the wheel are the main elements that influence the development of a Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP). The SEMP should ideally be reviewed on a cyclical basis as part of a federal government institution's planning cycle, as presented in Figure 2 below.
This figure represents the optimal planning cycle federal institutions should consider for undertaking their emergency management planning activities.
May: Senior Institutional Management reviews year-end reports from the previous year's activities. September: Senior Institutional Management conducts mid-year check on progress of key performance objectives. February: Senior Institutional Management makes decision regarding the institution's strategic priorities for the upcoming fiscal year. This section of the Guide outlines a recommended approach for developing a tailored SEMP and is supported by a blueprint and a SEMP template provided in Annexes A and B, respectively. Consider having members of the EM planning team designated by your institution's senior management. One of the most crucial steps in the EM planning process is to identify appropriate members for the EM planning team. The composition of the EM planning team will vary depending on institutional requirements; however, it is important that clear terms of reference (TOR) for the team be established and that individual assignments be clearly defined. After the EM planning team has clear authority and direction, the next step is to review any relevant existing legislation and policies.
As noted in Section Two, the EM planning process should be carried out as part of an institution's overall strategic and business planning processes—this will support their alignment.
Developing the SEMP can be supported by a formal work or project plan to ensure that established timelines for plan development are met. As a next step, federal government institutions should consider developing a comprehensive understanding of the planning context. An inventory of critical assets and services will assist the planning team in identifying the associated threats, hazards, vulnerabilities and risks unique to their institution. Risk assessment is central to any risk management process as well as the EM planning cycle.
A risk register or log is used to record information about identified risks and to facilitate the monitoring and management of risks.
Consider gathering a list of institutional risks and cross-referencing the existing plans (as identified in Step 2-1c) that address each risk. Each institution should establish an EM governance structure to oversee the management of emergencies. It is important that the planning team confirm the strategic priorities of the institution and of senior management so that they can be reflected in the SEMP. The planning team should aim to clearly identify the planning constraints and institutional limitations that will influence the SEMP building blocks and the subsequent development of the SEMP. Business Continuity Planning Process Diagram - Text VersionWhen business is disrupted, it can cost money.
Once you have identified your critical systems, RTOs, RPOs, etc, create a table, as shown below, to help you formulate the disaster recovery strategies you will use to protect them.
Based on the findings from incident response activities, the next step is to determine if disaster recovery plans should be launched, and which ones in particular should be invoked. A section on plan document dates and revisions is essential, and should include dates of revisions, what was revised and who approved the revisions. Once the plan has been launched, DR teams take the materials assigned to them and proceed with response and recovery activities as specified in the plans. If DR plans are to be invoked, incident response activities can be scaled back or terminated, depending on the incident, allowing for launch of the DR plans.
This section defines the criteria for launching the plan, what data is needed and who makes the determination. Technology DR plans can be enhanced with relevant recovery information and procedures obtained from system vendors. If your organisation already has records management and change management programmes, use them in your DR planning. Included within this part of the plan should be assembly areas for staff (primary and alternates), procedures for notifying and activating DR team members, and procedures for standing down the plan if management determines the DR plan response is not needed. The actual [Name of Nonprofit] Business Continuity Plan is supposed to supply the construction with regard to making programs to guarantee the security associated with workers, volunteers as well as customers (customers) and also the resumption associated with time-sensitive procedures as well as providers in case of an urgent situation (fireplace, energy or even marketing communications blackout, tornado, storm, ton, earthquake, municipal disruption, and so on, catastrophe, or even additional business being interrupted. Formulating a detailed recovery plan is the main aim of the entire IT disaster recovery planning project.
Note: We have included emergency management in Figure 2, as it represents activities that may be needed to address situations where humans are injured or situations such as fires that must be addressed by local fire brigades and other first responders.
In parallel to these activities are three additional ones: creating employee awareness, training and records management. It reflects leading practices (such as those provided by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and Canadian Standards Association) and procedures within the Government of Canada, and should be read in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Response Plan, the Emergency Management Framework for Canada and the Federal Policy for Emergency Management.
It is intended that governments and industry partners will work together to assess risks to the sector, develop plans to address these risks, and conduct exercises to validate the plans. The size and composition of the team may vary between federal government institutions; however, the planning team should ideally have the skill and experience necessary to develop the SEMP.


A sample cross-reference table of existing plans by identified institutional risks is provided in Annex C, Appendix 4.
As outlined in the Preface, many federal government institutions already have specific plans or processes to deal with aspects of emergency management; many also have a long track record of preparing and refining BCPs, which endeavour to ensure the continued availability of critical services.
Federal government institutions are increasing their focus on emergency management (EM) activities, given the evolving risk environment in their areas of responsibility.
This is why Public Safety Canada has developed this Emergency Management Planning Guide, which is intended to assist all federal government institutions in developing their all-hazards Strategic Emergency Management Plans (SEMPs). Many federal government institutions already have specific planning documents or processes to deal with aspects of emergency management that relate to their particular mandates; many also have a long track record of preparing and refining BCPs.
As a matter of process, the Emergency Management Planning Guide will be reviewed annually or as the situation dictates, and amendments will be made at that time. This work at the sector level will inform, and will be informed by, work at the organizational level such as EM plans and their component parts. Emergency Management resource requirements should be identified as early as possible to integrate into plans.
Inputs should ideally be assembled, reviewed and well understood prior to engaging in each distinct planning activity as they form an important foundation for the work to be completed.
Training is available to address EM requirements at the Canadian Emergency Management College (CEMC) and the Canada School of Public Service.
Training is available to address EM requirements at the Canadian Emergency Management College (CEMC) and the Canada School of Public Service. After completing the above steps, the planning team should consider developing a detailed work plan that includes a schedule with realistic timelines, milestones that reflect the institutional planning cycle, and a responsibility assignment matrix with assigned tasks and deadlines. It entails a process of gathering and analyzing information and typically considers both internal and external factors (see Figure 3: The Planning Context for additional information on the factors to consider). The key to any emergency planning is awareness of the potential situations that could impose risks on the organization and on Canadians and to assess those risks in terms of their impact and potential mitigation measures. If gaps are identified, these should ideally be gathered and presented as part of Step 3 when developing the EM Planning Framework and confirming the institution's strategic EM priorities. For further information, you may wish to consult the Canadian Disaster Database, which contains detailed disaster information on over 900 natural, technological and conflict events (excluding war) that have directly affected Canadians over the past century. Additional information on analyzing likelihood and impact is provided in the Treasury Board Integrated Risk Management Framework Guidelines. The EM planning governance structure may include representatives of an institution's senior management team, from all functional areas (such as programs) and all corporate areas (including communications, legal services and security). For example, an institution can be constrained by the availability of training for EM planning team members and by the number of EM positions they have staffed. Once your disaster recovery strategies have been developed, you’re ready to translate them into disaster recovery plans. The more detailed the plan is, the more likely the affected IT asset will be recovered and returned to normal operation.
Check with your vendors while developing your DR plans to see what they have in terms of emergency recovery documentation. Even though this plan of action offers assistance as well as paperwork where in order to bottom crisis reaction, resumption, as well as recuperation preparing initiatives, it’s not meant as an alternative with regard to knowledgeable decision-making. The following section details the elements in a DR plan in the sequence defined by ISO 27031 and ISO 24762. Planning can be triggered by the EM planning cycle or it can be initiated in preparation for, or in response to, an event that is induced either by nature or by human actions. An all-hazards approach to risk management does not necessarily mean that all hazards will be assessed, evaluated and treated, but rather that all hazards will be considered.
Equipping converted space with furnishings, equipment, power, connectivity and other resources would be required to meet the needs of workers.Partnership or reciprocal agreements can be arranged with other businesses or organizations that can support each other in the event of a disaster. Rather, the Business Continuity Plan is actually a good on-going, financed business exercise budgeted to supply assets necessary to: Carry out actions necessary to create and gaze after programs Teach as well as retrain workers Create as well as modify guidelines as well as requirements since the division modifications Physical exercise methods, methods, group as well as assets needs Statement on-going business continuity likely to older administration Investigation procedures as well as systems to enhance resumption as well as recuperation effectiveness Creating a Business Continuity Plan which includes actions necessary to preserve the practical continuity capacity helps to ensure that a regular preparing strategy is actually put on all the [Name of Nonprofit] procedures.
Once this work is out of the way, you’re ready to move on to developing disaster recovery strategies, followed by the actual plans.
This section should specify who has approved the plan, who is authorised to activate it and a list of linkages to other relevant plans and documents. This plan of action should be held present to guarantee the precision associated with its material. It is in these plans that you will set out the detailed steps needed to recover your IT systems to a state in which they can support the business after a disaster. The availability and cost of these options can be affected when a regional disaster results in competition for these resources.There are multiple strategies for recovery of manufacturing operations.
Business Continuity Plan Sample: This particular record offers the Business Continuity Plan. Here we’ll explain how to write a disaster recovery plan as well as how to develop disaster recovery strategies.



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Comments

  1. 12.04.2015 at 13:24:34


    May well need to have like medicine, blankets department of Homeland Security the huge stuff when more.

    Author: Seven_Urek_2
  2. 12.04.2015 at 19:48:52


    Land in southern WV which is my BO location as it is far less.

    Author: LADY