Developing a plan or a set of coordination procedures requires combining the knowledge, expertise, and information of many agencies across several jurisdictions that support military deployments during national emergencies. Confidence and trust among agencies necessary to support military missions during emergencies. The focus for users of this guide is on developing procedures or plans that address operational issues or concerns associated with military convoy movements. The Emergency Response Coordinator at the SDOT should verify the existence of current procedures and plans for supporting military deployments; this information will provide insight into the scope and scale of the update required or the creation of new procedures if necessary. Once this preliminary inventory and understanding has been developed, a process for developing or refining a plan or set of procedures can be selected using one of several approaches.
As a result of steps 1 and 2, background information and lists of military and support agency needs have been identified. Once the entire sequence and key interaction points have been defined and confirmed, a comprehensive review of the plan or set of coordination procedures should be made. Similar levels of detail would be needed for other coordination and interaction points of the plan or set of coordination procedures. Ultimately, the coordinating agencies should assess the appropriate level of detail and document this detail in the plan or procedures (Figure 23). Once a plan or set of preliminary coordination procedures has been developed, it should be submitted for independent agency review and confirmation. Once the preliminary coordination procedures have been reviewed and revised, the final set of coordination procedures or plan should be documented.
Federal government institutions in the early stages of developing a SEMP may find it useful to read the material in Sections One and Two, while other institutions with more established plans may wish to proceed directly to Section Three.
The Emergency Management Planning Unit, Public Safety Canada, is responsible for producing, revising and updating this Guide. The purpose of this Guide is to assist federal officials, managers and coordinators responsible for emergency management (EM) planning.
The SEMP is the overarching plan that provides a comprehensive and coordinated approach to EM activities.
A SEMP establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure for protecting Canadians and Canada from threats and hazards in their areas of responsibility, and sets out how the institution will assist the coordinated federal emergency response. The National Strategy and Action Plan for Critical Infrastructure establishes a public-private sector approach to managing risks, responding effectively to disruptions, and recovering swiftly when incidents occur. The SEMP should ideally be reviewed on a cyclical basis as part of a federal government institution's planning cycle, as presented in Figure 2 below. This figure represents the optimal planning cycle federal institutions should consider for undertaking their emergency management planning activities. Please note that Step 5 is presented under Section Four: Implementing and Maintaining the SEMP. Each step identifies inputs or considerations at the outset and concludes with the associated outputs.
This step involves starting the formal planning process in recognition of the responsibility to prepare a SEMP.
Consider having members of the EM planning team designated by your institution's senior management. One of the most crucial steps in the EM planning process is to identify appropriate members for the EM planning team. After the EM planning team has clear authority and direction, the next step is to review any relevant existing legislation and policies. As a next step, federal government institutions should consider developing a comprehensive understanding of the planning context. The Planning Context is represented in a target diagram that consists of three circles representing the factors federal institutions should consider in order to understand the context in which it operates and how it could potentially be affected. An inventory of critical assets and services will assist the planning team in identifying the associated threats, hazards, vulnerabilities and risks unique to their institution. Once the institution's context is clearly understood (refer to the environmental scan in Step 2-1), the next step is to find and recognize hazards, threats and possibly trends and drivers, and to describe them in risk statements.
Consider gathering a list of institutional risks and cross-referencing the existing plans (as identified in Step 2-1c) that address each risk.
This step focuses on developing an informed EM approach for your institution based on the four pillars of EM. Each institution should establish an EM governance structure to oversee the management of emergencies. Emergencies can quickly escalate in scope and severity, cross jurisdictional lines, take on international dimensions and result in significant human and economic losses.
This is why Public Safety Canada has developed this Emergency Management Planning Guide, which is intended to assist all federal government institutions in developing their all-hazards Strategic Emergency Management Plans (SEMPs). It should integrate and coordinate elements identified in operational plans and business continuity plans (BCPs). Each of these functions addresses a need that may arise before or during an emergency. It entails a process of gathering and analyzing information and typically considers both internal and external factors (see Figure 3: The Planning Context for additional information on the factors to consider).
The key to any emergency planning is awareness of the potential situations that could impose risks on the organization and on Canadians and to assess those risks in terms of their impact and potential mitigation measures. If gaps are identified, these should ideally be gathered and presented as part of Step 3 when developing the EM Planning Framework and confirming the institution's strategic EM priorities. A sample cross-reference table of existing plans by identified institutional risks is provided in Annex C, Appendix 4. At the other extreme, a formal planning body or group may address military deployment coordination and activities.


In step three, these roles and responsibilities will be further refined during detailed discussions of activities, information flow, agency coordination, and decision making.
It does not lay out the requirements for preparing related EM protocols, processes, and standard operating procedures (SOP) internal to the institution; however, these should be developed in support of the SEMP and related plans. Planning can be triggered by the EM planning cycle or it can be initiated in preparation for, or in response to, an event that is induced either by nature or by human actions.
Notwithstanding the blueprint provided, this step is not proposed as a linear process, but rather as a set of related components and activities that can be undertaken in the sequence that best suits the institution. The elements of the procedures or plans are built on the roles and responsibilities of key agencies described in chapter 2 as well as a detailed understanding of military deployment planning and movements on public roads described in chapter 3. Additional data may need to be collected from others to gather sufficient background information about military deployment routes, current permitting processes, contact lists, communication practices (technical and organizational), and recent validation of the current procedures or plan. This alignment of needs will provide the basis for identifying agency activities and documenting a plan or a set of coordination procedures.
Stakeholders may include First Nations, emergency first responders, the private sector (both business and industry), and volunteer and non-government organizations.
The Emergency Response Coordinator should then distribute the coordination procedures or plan with a proposed approach for further testing and updates. Similarly, interagency communications procedures and protocols during normal and emergency situations should be confirmed.
The current procedures may be part of an existing EHTR or may be a set of independent coordination procedures and plans. This review step will ensure all the detailed activities have been identified and properly sequenced, the appropriate supporting agencies are identified, and agency representatives are aware of their supporting roles and responsibilities. This step will ensure the proposed procedures are complete and properly sequenced, and the key coordination and interaction points have been identified. Based on the independent review, a revised plan or set of coordination procedures should be developed and documented. The documentation should include activities for keeping the plan current through reviews and updates at least annually. A SEMP establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure for protecting Canadians and Canada from threats and hazards in their areas of responsibility and sets out how the institution will assist the coordinated federal emergency response. Supporting templates and tools can contribute to effective emergency management planning and are provided with this Guide. The EM plans of federal government institutions should address the risks to critical infrastructure within or related to the institution's areas of responsibility, as well as the measures for protecting this infrastructure. Given this variety of EM planning documents, the distinctions between them are summarized in the following table. It outlines the processes and mechanisms to facilitate an integrated Government of Canada response to an emergency and to eliminate the need for departments to coordinate a wider Government of Canada response. Emergency management (EM) refers to the management of emergencies concerning all hazards, including all activities and risk management measures related to prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. This section of the Guide outlines a recommended approach for developing a tailored SEMP and is supported by a blueprint and a SEMP template provided in Annexes A and B, respectively. Consider including a member of your institution's corporate planning area on the EM planning team in order to help align the EM planning cycle with the institution's overall business planning cycle.
As noted in Section Two, the EM planning process should be carried out as part of an institution's overall strategic and business planning processes—this will support their alignment.
Additional supporting planning tools and templates as well as an EM glossary are provided in Annexes C and D, respectively. Once all documentation is identified, consider conducting a gap analysis to determine whether the institution is currently meeting its obligations as identified in Step 1. Risk assessment is central to any risk management process as well as the EM planning cycle. This step will contribute to the concept that sound EM decision-making can be based on an understanding and evaluation of hazards, vulnerabilities and related risks.
It is important that the planning team confirm the strategic priorities of the institution and of senior management so that they can be reflected in the SEMP.
Federal government institutions are increasing their focus on emergency management (EM) activities, given the evolving risk environment in their areas of responsibility. Many federal government institutions already have specific planning documents or processes to deal with aspects of emergency management that relate to their particular mandates; many also have a long track record of preparing and refining BCPs. It is intended that governments and industry partners will work together to assess risks to the sector, develop plans to address these risks, and conduct exercises to validate the plans. These treatment options, forming recommendations, would be used to develop the risk treatment step in the risk management or emergency management cycle. The resulting SEMP building blocks will reflect strategic priorities—the desired balance between developing measures that respond to emergencies versus mitigating the risk. The following topical outline of a set of coordination procedures or plan is offered as a means of organizing and documenting the products from this step (Figure 22). As outlined in the Preface, many federal government institutions already have specific plans or processes to deal with aspects of emergency management; many also have a long track record of preparing and refining BCPs, which endeavour to ensure the continued availability of critical services. Those federal government institutions that have mandated emergency support functions (ESFs) under the FERP should have these clearly identified. This process will add the extra assurance that your institution is linked in with partner agencies and others to assist in developing the broader environmental picture and in identifying EM-related interdependencies. Such formal bodies may exist in some States and reside in agencies with responsibility for statewide emergency management or homeland security functions. Once completed, the documented plan or procedures should be submitted for formal approval (signature) and distribution to the supporting agencies. The aim is to develop a SEMP that integrates and coordinates elements identified in hazard-specific plans and BCPs.


Some agencies include the coordination procedures as part of statewide emergency transportation management procedures. This strategy requires ensuring telecommuters have a suitable home work environment and are equipped with or have access to a computer with required applications and data, peripherals, and a secure broadband connection.In an emergency, space at another facility can be put to use. This chapter describes a five-step process for developing or refining coordination procedures or plans. A plan is a comprehensive description of activities, resources, roles, and responsibilities with additional detailed consideration for updates and testing. First, the Emergency Response Coordinator at the SDOT should develop an inventory and an understanding of current procedures or plans, identify the organizational structure or format for developing the procedures, and identify key participants or agencies. The development and employment of a SEMP is an important complement to such existing plans, because it promotes an integrated and coordinated approach to emergency management planning within federal institutions and across the federal government. The Emergency Management Planning Guide uses a step-by-step approach and provides instructions that are supplemented by the Blueprint and the Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) template provided in Annexes A and B, respectively. It includes 13 emergency support functions that the federal government can implement in response to an emergency. The Emergency Management Continuum is depicted in a wheel diagram where all four risk-based functions of emergency management are interconnected and interdependent in a system from prevention and mitigation to preparedness, response, and recovery. Federal government institutions should consider identifying the range of experience and skill sets required in the EM planning team. Developing the SEMP can be supported by a formal work or project plan to ensure that established timelines for plan development are met.
Consider developing an overview of these priorities and identifying potential areas for attention given risk probabilities and vulnerabilities.
As a matter of process, the Emergency Management Planning Guide will be reviewed annually or as the situation dictates, and amendments will be made at that time.
This work at the sector level will inform, and will be informed by, work at the organizational level such as EM plans and their component parts. The EM planning governance structure may include representatives of an institution's senior management team, from all functional areas (such as programs) and all corporate areas (including communications, legal services and security).
EM planning, in particular, aims to strengthen resiliency by promoting an integrated and comprehensive approach that includes the four pillars of EM: prevention and mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery. In either case, the development of a plan or set of succinct procedures will require cross-agency and jurisdictional coordination and collaboration for military convoy movements to be effective. In any case, a determination must be made as to the type of planning approach and the use of formal or informal organizational structures. Operational plans may be based on all four pillars of EM planning, or focus on the specific activities of a single pillar. In the center of the wheel are the main elements that influence the development of a Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP). The composition of the EM planning team will vary depending on institutional requirements; however, it is important that clear terms of reference (TOR) for the team be established and that individual assignments be clearly defined. The planning team should aim to clearly identify the planning constraints and institutional limitations that will influence the SEMP building blocks and the subsequent development of the SEMP. The Guide includes a Blueprint (see Annex A), a Strategic Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) template (see Annex B), and supporting step-by-step instructions, tools and tips to develop and maintain a comprehensive SEMP—an overarching plan that establishes a federal government institution's objectives, approach and structure, which generally sets out how the institution will assist with coordinated federal emergency management, including response. Emergency Management resource requirements should be identified as early as possible to integrate into plans. For example, an institution can be constrained by the availability of training for EM planning team members and by the number of EM positions they have staffed.
In addition, there are other existing EM planning documents and initiatives that apply to a range of federal government institutions, such as the Federal Emergency Response Plan (FERP) and deliverables under the National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure. For example, for substantial convoy movements planned through a metropolitan area, traffic operation centers may need to be alerted about the timing and volume on the convoy routes. Figure 1 highlights the four interdependent risk-based functions of EM: prevention and mitigation of, preparedness for, response to, and recovery from emergencies.
Business Continuity Planning Process Diagram - Text VersionWhen business is disrupted, it can cost money. As such, federal institutions are to base EM plans on mandate-specific all-hazards risk assessments, as well as put in place institutional structures to provide governance for EM activities and align them with government-wide EM governance structures. Inputs should ideally be assembled, reviewed and well understood prior to engaging in each distinct planning activity as they form an important foundation for the work to be completed. It reflects leading practices (such as those provided by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and Canadian Standards Association) and procedures within the Government of Canada, and should be read in conjunction with the Federal Emergency Response Plan, the Emergency Management Framework for Canada and the Federal Policy for Emergency Management.
The SEMP should be central to the federal government institution's EM activities and provide clear linkages for integrating and coordinating all other intra-departmental and inter-departmental emergency management plans. The size and composition of the team may vary between federal government institutions; however, the planning team should ideally have the skill and experience necessary to develop the SEMP. Training is available to address EM requirements at the Canadian Emergency Management College (CEMC) and the Canada School of Public Service. Training is available to address EM requirements at the Canadian Emergency Management College (CEMC) and the Canada School of Public Service. After completing the above steps, the planning team should consider developing a detailed work plan that includes a schedule with realistic timelines, milestones that reflect the institutional planning cycle, and a responsibility assignment matrix with assigned tasks and deadlines.



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